Open to anyone who wants to learn, our personal enrichment programs offer a wide selection of courses, workshops, and lecture series delivered by the top-notch JHU faculty and community experts. Odyssey doesn’t have grades or exams—just learning for the sake of learning in a fun, creative environment. Explore our extensive course listings from science to art, writing to photography—choose course subjects across these areas:

  • Odyssey on the Go: single session programs
  • Perspectives: Keynote Lecture and Multi-Speaker Programs
  • Arts and Humanities
  • Music, Cinema, and the Performing Arts
  • Science and Nature
  • Certificate on Aging
  • Writing and Communications
  • Photography, Film, and Digital Arts

Odyssey Spring 2021 Course Catalog

Odyssey Spring 2021 Course CatalogOur new Spring 2021 courses will be offered exclusively through Zoom’s online platform. In the Spring 2020 semester, we successfully transitioned many of our courses to this online format and received positive feedback from our students.

Zoom links will be sent to registered participants on the day of their scheduled course. Updates will be posted on our website, social media, and communicated directly to students through email.

You can browse our entire Spring 2021 Course Catalog.

Spring 2021 Semester April and May Course Highlights

Fall 2020 is unlike any semester we have dealt with in the past. When the pandemic hit and challenging times were on the horizon, the Odyssey community rallied together. The Instructors and student population clicked on their computers and created a wonderful learning environment with the online platform of Zoom. As we start to see a “light of the end of the tunnel” with the proposed vaccine, we will continue our online offerings for the Spring 2021 semester. We wish we could determine how long it will be until we are able to come back to on-ground courses, but we appreciate your continued enrollment of the online offerings. The Instructors have worked hard to make this 2021 semester, even better than 2020.

Upcoming April and May Odyssey courses are on the horizon. Sign up today!

4 Sessions: Tuesday, April 6 – 27, 7:00-9:00 p.m.

Instructor: Lewis Katz

Tuition: $140

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Whether shooting digitally or on film, it is necessary to have an understanding of the fundamentals of photography. In this course, specifically designed for online learning, you will gain an understanding of exposure and the settings that affect it, such as shutter speed, aperture, and ISO. The course includes detailed handouts that you will receive one week prior to each class. We will also discuss and demonstrate subjects such as white balance, histograms, and composition techniques. By using images shared by both the students and the instructor, you will learn how to use your camera to its fullest potential and to create images that you will be proud to share with family and friends.

Lewis Katz is an experienced photographer and instructor in the Baltimore area. He teaches at Roland Park Country School, CCBC, and the Baltimore Camera Club. His work may be viewed at lewiskatzphotography.com.

2 Sessions: Saturday, April 10; 9:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. & Sunday, April 12, 1:30 – 4:45 p.m.

Program Coordinator: Mark Croatti

Tuition: $105

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Odyssey presents four case studies involving controversial issues and the highly influential-and widely disputed-court decisions that followed. Case topics include peremptory challenge-using race as a jury selection factor; how English Common Law evolved; information collected without a search warrant; and how technology collects modern evidence, such as DNA samples and cell phone records. Who were the parties and what was at stake? What were the major points and why did the courts rule accordingly? How have these decisions affected similar disputes and are they the final word on these topics? Join us to discover the surprising foundations of modern U.S. case law! Details here.

Mark Croatti, M.A., has taught Comparative Politics at The George Washington University since 2002 and also taught courses in 2012 and 2013 within the School of Law as part of the University of Oregon’s Conflict & Dispute Resolution Master’s Program. Last year he authored an editorial in The Annapolis Capital arguing that a statue of President Thomas Mifflin (president under the Articles of Confederation) should occupy the spot on the grounds of the Maryland State House where a statue once stood of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, who wrote the decision on the Dred Scott case.

1 Session: Saturday, April 17, 11:00 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.

Instructor: Judith Krummeck

Tuition: $25

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Felix Mendelssohn remains one of the best-known Romantic composers, and works like the incidental music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream; his Italian Symphony; his Violin Concerto, and his String Octet are still a stable part of the repertoire to this day. Felix regularly submitted his compositions to the discerning musical eye and ear of his older sister, Fanny, referring to her as “Minerva,” the Roman goddess of wisdom, for her highly developed musical and intellectual insight. One sibling was lauded, one remained obscure.

Judith Krummeck, M.F.A., is a writer and broadcaster. She is the evening drive time host for WBJC, Maryland’s classical music station, and her biographical memoir, Old New Worlds, intertwining the immigrant stories of her great-great-grandmother and her own, was published last fall. Before turning to broadcasting and writing, Judith was an actor in Cape Town; notable roles included Ophelia and Cordelia.

2 Sessions: Saturday, April 24 9:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.; Sunday, April 25, 1:30-4:45 p.m.

Program Coordinator: Mark Croatti

Tuition: $105

Register

Following the 1972 federal Clean Water Act, the EPA, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia signed the 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement, reinforced in 1987 and 1992, to clean up the Bay by 2000. After Delaware and West Virginia joined the effort, a new goal of 2010 was announced and Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley created BayStat to monitor the initiative. When that deadline passed, New York and the other states adopted the Chesapeake Clean Water Blueprint in 2014 to progressively reduce pollutant levels until 2025. Various updates have followed, including a University of Maryland study in 2020 that dropped the Bay’s health rating from a C to a C-minus. What comes next? Join us for a comprehensive discussion on the future of Chesapeake Bay! Details here

Mark Croatti, M.A., has taught Comparative Politics at The George Washington University since 2002 and also taught courses in 2012 and 2013 within the School of Law as part of the University of Oregon’s Conflict & Dispute Resolution Master’s Program. Last year he authored an editorial in The Annapolis Capital arguing that a statue of President Thomas Mifflin (president under the Articles of Confederation) should occupy the spot on the grounds of the Maryland State House where a statue once stood of Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, who wrote the decision on the Dred Scott case.

4 Sessions: Monday, April 26- May 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Instructor: Pete Kakel

Tuition: $140

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Until quite recently, the systematic destruction of the North American continent’s Indigenous peoples has too often been hidden or ignored, forgotten, or even outright denied in the traditional master narratives of the United States and Canadian history, respectively. Informed by a new wave of scholarship, this course will examine the same themes – conquest, dispossession, depopulation, and repopulation -in the relevant time periods, focusing mostly (but not exclusively) on the geography that became the white settler state we call ‘The United States of America’. It will also touch on how the brutal colonization of North America’s Indigenous Peoples became a source of inspiration, legitimization, and model for a number of late-nineteenth and early twentieth-century imperial projects, as part of the globalization of the American frontier history. Along the way, we will discover that the North American West was a process (not a place), an extremely violent and successful colonization process that invited repetition. And finally, we will explore the traumatic impact of past and ongoing American settler colonialism on today’s Indigenous communities.

Pete Kakel, Ph.D., is a research historian and lecturer. The author of two books, he holds degrees from Ohio Wesleyan University (B.A. in History); Johns Hopkins University (M.L.A. with History concentration); and Royal Holloway College, University of London (M.A. in Holocaust Studies and Ph.D. in Modern History).

4 Sessions: Wednesday, May 5 – 26, 1:00 p.m.- 3 p.m.

Instructor: Daniel Weiser

Tuition: $140

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In this course, pianist and educator Daniel Weiser will explore the tragically short, but incredibly productive life of America’s greatest composer. The son of Russian Jewish immigrants, Gershwin grew up in the rough, chaotic streets of New York and soaked up the melting pot around him to help formulate the new, brash sound of America. Combining elements of “Jewish” music with the “Blues” and “Ragtime” brought by recent black migrants from the South, Gershwin would help produce the new “Jazz” that would soon help make New York City a new center for musical culture. Gershwin seamlessly moved between the “classical” and “popular” worlds to help obscure some of the more overt differences between them. Over four classes, Dr. Weiser will play much of Gershwin’s concert music, including “Rhapsody in Blue,” “An American in Paris,” and his “Preludes.” He will also perform many of his iconic songs, most written with his brother Ira, as well as his obscure early opera, “Blue Monday.”

Daniel E. Weiser, D.M.A. in Piano/Chamber Music and M.M. in Ensemble Arts (Peabody Conservatory of Music at JHU), has taught at Dartmouth College, UNC, Asheville, and the St. Paul’s School in Concord, NH. He has performed at Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall, the National Gallery of Art in D.C, and concertized in Israel, Thailand, Pakistan, Holland, and France. He is the founder and Artistic Director of AmiciMusic, dedicated to performing chamber music in intimate and non-traditional venues.

Registration

Access our online registration system to search courses by category, access your student account, and get help with registration.

JHU Tuition Remission and Discounts

If you are a candidate for tuition remission, please do not register online. To receive JHU Tuition Remission Benefits, JHU Alumni Discounts, or Osher at JHU member discounts for Odyssey courses, please call 410-516-8516 and leave a message with your email address. We will return all inquiries through email.

Certificate on Aging

Built upon the solid tradition of excellence, Johns Hopkins University offers a Certificate on Aging and now an Advanced Certificate on Aging. The non-credit certificate is designed for those who work with aging adults and their families.

Contact Information

Johns Hopkins Odyssey Program

Phone
Location
3400 N. Charles Street
Wyman Park Building, Suite S-740
Baltimore, MD 21218
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