Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

Notice for Writing Program students: Early registration usually guarantees students get the courses they want. Certain courses combine students from two campuses using online tools and video-conferencing equipment. Click for full course descriptions. Is your desired course full? Slots are likely to open up in courses especially in the last week or two before classes begin. For real-time status, please go to SIS. Keep checking back!

  • Homewood Campus

    490.660.01 - Fiction Workshop

    Eleanor Williams

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/4 - 8/20

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students’ writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors, if possible. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master’s degree. The 660-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.670.06 - Nonfiction Workshop

    Willis McCabe

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/4 - 8/20

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles or book chapters. Revisions, exercises and readings also are required. Students may take this general workshop or any specialized workshop to meet the requirement of three workshops for the MA in Writing. The 670-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.702.06 - Readings in Global Fact and Fiction

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/29 - 8/21

    This cross-concentration elective course presents intensive readings in fiction and nonfiction from around the world. By discussing both fact and fiction, students learn how different cultures, values and histories create differing literature. Readings include a sampling from at least three continents, with specific texts announced in advance for each section. Fiction and nonfiction students earn elective credit in this course, which focuses on craft analysis and discussion but also may involve student and team presentations and a final project of creative or analytical writing. This course combines the content of the previous International Nonfiction and 20th Century World Literature courses.

  • Washington DC Center

    490.660.51 - Fiction Workshop

    Rion Scott

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/3 - 8/19

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students’ writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors, if possible. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master’s degree. The 660-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.670.56 - Nonfiction Workshop

    Willis McCabe

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/4 - 8/20

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles or book chapters. Revisions, exercises and readings also are required. Students may take this general workshop or any specialized workshop to meet the requirement of three workshops for the MA in Writing. The 670-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.681.51 - The Craft of Poetry: An Introduction for Fiction and Nonfiction Writers

    Edward Perlman

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/3 - 7/10
    Thursday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/30 - 7/10

    This popular elective course helps fiction and factual writers apply the techniques, vision and benefits of poetry to their writing. Through reading, discussion and writing, students explore the lessons of free verse and formal poems, especially their careful attention to language, rhythm, theme, and other tenets of poetic craft. This course engages those with experience in poetry, as well as those new to the field. As part of this course, students will write and workshop poems with their classmates. This onsite course also may involve some online interactivity.

    490.702.56 - Readings in Global Fact and Fiction

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/29 - 8/21

    This cross-concentration elective course presents intensive readings in fiction and nonfiction from around the world. By discussing both fact and fiction, students learn how different cultures, values and histories create differing literature. Readings include a sampling from at least three continents, with specific texts announced in advance for each section. Fiction and nonfiction students earn elective credit in this course, which focuses on craft analysis and discussion but also may involve student and team presentations and a final project of creative or analytical writing. This course combines the content of the previous International Nonfiction and 20th Century World Literature courses.

  • Off-Site or International

    490.785.91 - Our American West: The Evolution of a Counter Narrative

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 6/24 - 6/29

    Using classic western films as a springboard for discussion, this class will explore the evolution of a counter-narrative from writers of both fiction and nonfiction. Readings will include novels, histories and literary nonfiction, all with an eye toward understanding our complicated western expansion, and how our shifting literary legacy corrects, amends, or counters prevailing narratives of the American West. This condensed, one-week course will take place at the University of Montana in Missoula, where Writing students will join with students in the Science Writing and Teaching Writing residencies. The course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Because the stories we tell ourselves about place shape our identity and sense of self, students will study the craft of scenes and settings in these works with an eye toward deepening our own observations and skills through writing exercises in the landscape of Montana.

    Missoula, Montana: One-week onsite course June 23 to June 30. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition ($3,108 (Tuition as of summer 2019) + a nonrefundable seminar Fee ($450, includes two receptions) + lodging fee ($200). Fees do not include transportation costs. If you drop this course after March 15, there will be no refund of the seminar and lodging fees. (Tuition refunds will follow the standard AAP schedule. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.) (REGISTRATION RUNS: February 25, 2019 at 10am to March 15, 2019 at 11:59pm) Tuition/Lab Fees Course Fees: $3108.00, Seminar Fees: $450.00, Lodging fee: $200 Schedule: 06.23.2019 to 06.29.2019, MTWThFS 9:00 A.M. - -5:00 p.m. (off site; not JHU) 05.29.2019 – 08.21.2019

    490.785.92 - Our American West: The Evolution of a Counter Narrative

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    Using classic western films as a springboard for discussion, this class will explore the evolution of a counter-narrative from writers of both fiction and nonfiction. Readings will include novels, histories and literary nonfiction, all with an eye toward understanding our complicated western expansion, and how our shifting literary legacy corrects, amends, or counters prevailing narratives of the American West. This condensed, one-week course will take place at the University of Montana in Missoula, where Writing students will join with students in the Science Writing and Teaching Writing residencies. The course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Because the stories we tell ourselves about place shape our identity and sense of self, students will study the craft of scenes and settings in these works with an eye toward deepening our own observations and skills through writing exercises in the landscape of Montana.

    Missoula, Montana: One-week onsite course June 23 to June 30. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition ($3,108 (Tuition as of summer 2019) + a nonrefundable seminar Fee ($450, includes two receptions). Fees do not include transportation or lodging costs. If you drop this course after March 15, there will be no refund of the seminar fees. (Tuition refunds will follow the standard AAP schedule. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.) (REGISTRATION RUNS: February 25, 2019 at 10am to March 15, 2019 at 11:59pm) Tuition/Lab Fees Course Fees: $3108.00, Seminar Fees: $450.00 Schedule: 06.23.2019 to 06.29.2019, MTWThFS 9:00 A.M. - -5:00 p.m. (off site; not JHU) 05.29.2019 – 08.21.2019

    490.785.93 - Our American West: The Evolution of a Counter Narrative

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    Using classic western films as a springboard for discussion, this class will explore the evolution of a counter-narrative from writers of both fiction and nonfiction. Readings will include novels, histories and literary nonfiction, all with an eye toward understanding our complicated western expansion, and how our shifting literary legacy corrects, amends, or counters prevailing narratives of the American West. This condensed, one-week course will take place at the University of Montana in Missoula, where Writing students will join with students in the Science Writing and Teaching Writing residencies. The course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Because the stories we tell ourselves about place shape our identity and sense of self, students will study the craft of scenes and settings in these works with an eye toward deepening our own observations and skills through writing exercises in the landscape of Montana.

    Missoula, Montana: One-week onsite course June 23 to June 30. Costs = Alumni Non-Credit/Audit Tuition ($1554, one half the full tuition of $3,108) + a nonrefundable seminar Fee ($450, includes two receptions) plus $200 lodging fee to stay in the dorm. Fees do not include transportation. If you drop this course after March 15, there will be no refund of the seminar fees. (Tuition refunds will follow the standard AAP schedule. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.) (REGISTRATION RUNS: February 25, 2019 at 10am to March 15, 2019 at 11:59pm) Tuition/Lab Fees Course Fees: $1554.00 + Seminar Fees: $450.00 + Lodging Fee $200.00 Schedule: 06.23.2019 to 06.29.2019, MTWThFS 9:00 A.M. - -5:00 p.m. (off site; not JHU) 05.29.2019 – 08.21.2019

    490.785.94 - Our American West: The Evolution of a Counter Narrative

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    Using classic western films as a springboard for discussion, this class will explore the evolution of a counter-narrative from writers of both fiction and nonfiction. Readings will include novels, histories and literary nonfiction, all with an eye toward understanding our complicated western expansion, and how our shifting literary legacy corrects, amends, or counters prevailing narratives of the American West. This condensed, one-week course will take place at the University of Montana in Missoula, where Writing students will join with students in the Science Writing and Teaching Writing residencies. The course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Because the stories we tell ourselves about place shape our identity and sense of self, students will study the craft of scenes and settings in these works with an eye toward deepening our own observations and skills through writing exercises in the landscape of Montana.

    Missoula, Montana: One-week onsite course June 23 to June 30. Costs = Alumni Non-Credit/Audit Tuition ($1554, one half the full tuition of $3,108) + a nonrefundable seminar Fee ($450, includes two receptions). Fees do not include transportation or lodging costs. If you drop this course after March 15, there will be no refund of the seminar fees. (Tuition refunds will follow the standard AAP schedule. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.) (REGISTRATION RUNS: February 25, 2019 at 10am to March 15, 2019 at 11:59pm) Tuition/Lab Fees Course Fees: $1554.00 + Seminar Fees: $450.00 Schedule: 06.23.2019 to 06.29.2019, MTWThFS 9:00 A.M. - -5:00 p.m. (off site; not JHU) 05.29.2019 – 08.21.2019