Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

Notice for Writing Program students: Early registration usually guarantees students get the courses they want. Certain courses combine students from two campuses using online tools and video-conferencing equipment. Click for full course descriptions. Is your desired course full? Slots are likely to open up in courses especially in the last week or two before classes begin. For real-time status, please go to SIS. Keep checking back!

  • Homewood Campus

    490.669.01 - Combined Workshop in Nonfiction and Fiction

    William Black

    Thursday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/28 - 8/13

    This course allows students in nonfiction and fiction to earn a workshop credit in the same class. Students in both concentrations and from either Washington or Baltimore are urged to enroll. In most cases, this course will have a separate instructor in each concentration who will form smaller workshop groups. Those groups will then workshop material in innovative ways, including digital discussion, video conferencing, phone conferencing, or one-on-one discussion with the instructor. These workshops groups sometimes do not meet each week at a set day and time, making this course more flexible and convenient to students from different campuses. Students need advisor permission to enroll in this course.

    490.711.06 - Masterworks: Examining the Boundaries

    Barbara Vanasco

    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/27 - 8/12

    This cross-concentration reading course, designed for fiction or nonfiction students, focuses on a writer’s analysis of masterworks in fiction, nonfiction, nature, travel or poetry – and how those forms may be combined in various hybrids. The course involves extensive reading and discussion of technique and the changing boundaries among the genres. The format includes craft reports, response writing and individual or team presentations, plus a final creative or critical work.

  • Washington DC Center

    490.660.51 - Fiction Workshop

    Eleanor Williams

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/1 - 8/17

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students’ writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors, if possible. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master’s degree. The 660-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.665.51 - Combined Workshop and Readings in Memoir

    Cathy Alter

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/2 - 8/18

    Writers have long enjoyed a major impact on contemporary thought by producing compelling essays about personal experiences, feelings, or ideas. This innovative experience allows students to earn either Nonfiction Workshop credit or a Nonfiction reading elective credit in a single, combined course. The workshop component allows students to experiment with memoir and the personal essay as distinct forms and as explorations of the self, while the reading component focuses on essay and memoir both short and long, with the goal of deeper understanding of these popular writing forms. Students may count this course as either a workshop or an elective, depending on their needs. There is no prerequisite for students in the Nonfiction concentration; students in other concentrations or programs must seek permission from their advisor and the Writing Program director.

    490.711.56 - Masterworks: Examining the Boundaries

    Barbara Vanasco

    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/27 - 8/12

    This cross-concentration reading course, designed for fiction or nonfiction students, focuses on a writer’s analysis of masterworks in fiction, nonfiction, nature, travel or poetry – and how those forms may be combined in various hybrids. The course involves extensive reading and discussion of technique and the changing boundaries among the genres. The format includes craft reports, response writing and individual or team presentations, plus a final creative or critical work.

  • Online Courses

    490.660.81 - Fiction Workshop

    Susan Muaddi-darraj

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students’ writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors, if possible. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master’s degree. The 660-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.690.81 - Travel Writing Workshop

    Alexandra Viets

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The best travel writers weave a rich “sense of place”— a trait also crucial to literary fiction, memoir, and creative nonfiction. The telling detail, apt metaphor, historical reference, cultural connection, and vivid character sketch, coupled with reflections that link these observations to broader themes, can elevate travel writing beyond the guidebook. In this specialized nonfiction workshop, students complete exercises, hear guest speakers, and analyze the works of acclaimed writers such as Jan Morris, Barry Lopez, Ian Frazier, and Jonathan Raban. Students may be asked to visit an assigned nearby location to prepare writing. This workshop counts as one of the three required for a nonfiction degree. Enrollees must have completed or waived the nonfiction core courses. Fiction students may enroll only with program permission.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.766.81 - Completing the Novel

    Timothy Wendel

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Many writers begin novels, but far fewer finish them, let alone have the manuscripts fully ready for a publisher’s consideration. In this new fully online class, JHU writer-in-residence Tim Wendel helps students move forward with their works. The class will focus on writing, revising, selling novels in general, as well as some workshop components. The “point of no return,” effective set pieces, quality dialogue and utilizing lessons from film and other art forms are a few of the class topics. Wendel is the author of 13 published books, including a pair of full-length novels, two children’s books and a novella.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.767.81 - Writing the Nonfiction Book Proposal


    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This fully online course is designed for writers who have a specific nonfiction book project in mind and are looking to secure an agent or publisher based on the well-drafted proposal. Students can be working on a book based on reporting, a memoir, or a collection of essays but they should register for the class only if they already have an idea for a book. Over the course of the semester, students will draft, revise, and refine a 15-page proposal, will develop a chapter outline, and will write a sample chapter or two. Based on feedback from the instructor and fellow students, each writer will complete the course with a polished proposal based on publishing industry standards.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.770.81 - Writing the Other


    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The fiction course, which may be taken for elective or workshop credit, focuses on practical approaches to writing "the other." We examine dominant paradigms of otherness, drawing from a worldview that is shaped by our own biographies. We explore varied methods, including defamiliarization and empathization exercises, of bridging cultural and other socially constructed differences, for the writing of successful fiction. Though our emphasis is on writing our own stories that are then reviewed and critiqued by our peers in an online "author-centered" workshop, we shall also discuss some texts which will include: Writing the Other: A Practical Approach by Nisi Shawl & Cynthia Ward, The Art of Perspective: Who Tells the Story by Christopher Castellani, The Art of Subtext: Beyond Plot by Charles Baxter (also Baxter's chapter on "Defamiliarization" from his book, Burning Down the House), "Write What You Don't Know: An Outsider's Reflection on Place, Memory and the Creative Process" by Zakes Mda (a chapter from Mda's book, Justify the Enemy: Becoming Human in South Africa), and "The Uses and Misuses of Other people's Myths" by Wendy Doniger O'Flaherty.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International

    490.784.91 - Reading and Writing New England

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThFSa 9:00 - 5:00; 5/27 - 8/18

    This cross-concentration reading and craft course for the Hopkins Conference on Craft in Bar Harbor, Maine, focuses on the flaneur tradition and the curious link between the mind and feet. From Virginia Woolf to Elizabeth Strout, from Max Beerbohm to E.B. White, writers who walk –and write about their walks or their characters’ walks—have proliferated in the last two centuries. We will analyze this literature and make forays of our own into Acadia National Park to experiment with the form. Drawing on the outward facing gaze of New Englanders like Strout and White, we’ll cast a particular eye toward a sense of place. This condensed course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Special onsite Residency course in Bar Harbor, ME, from July 11 – 18, 2020. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition (currently $3108; note that tuition may increase slightly in SU20) + Academic Fee ($450) + Lodging Fee (375; includes 7 nights dorm lodging and some meals). Total: $ 3933 (plus possible tuition increase). Special refund policy applies: The Academic and Lodging Fees are charged with tuition at the time of registration. After February 24, the Academic/Lodging Fees ($825) are not refundable; only tuition will be refunded according to the usual AAP refund policy. Open Registration for this course is February 1, 2020 at 10:00am.

    490.784.92 - Reading and Writing New England

    Karen Houppert

    MTWThFSa 9:00 - 5:00; 5/27 - 8/18

    This cross-concentration reading and craft course for the Hopkins Conference on Craft in Bar Harbor, Maine, focuses on the flaneur tradition and the curious link between the mind and feet. From Virginia Woolf to Elizabeth Strout, from Max Beerbohm to E.B. White, writers who walk –and write about their walks or their characters’ walks—have proliferated in the last two centuries. We will analyze this literature and make forays of our own into Acadia National Park to experiment with the form. Drawing on the outward facing gaze of New Englanders like Strout and White, we’ll cast a particular eye toward a sense of place. This condensed course counts as an elective for students in any concentration.

    Special onsite Residency course in Bar Harbor, ME, from July 11 – 18, 2020. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition (currently $3108; note that tuition may increase slightly in SU20) + Academic Fee ($450). Total: $3558 (plus possible tuition increase). Special refund policy applies: The Academic Fee is charged with tuition at the time of registration. After February 24, the Academic Fee ($450) is not refundable; only tuition will be refunded according to the usual AAP refund policy. Open Registration for this course is February 1, 2020 at 10:00am.