Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Online Courses

    460.601.81 - Exploring Museum Professions

    Stephanie Brown

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    460.602.81 - Museums in the Digital Age

    Phyllis Hecht

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    With the emergence of new media and the ever-expanding use of the Internet, the traditional role and scope of the museum is changing. The museum has a new position in global communication, dissemination of information and cultural understanding. The introduction of technology into the museum is challenging traditional exhibition concepts, introducing new interactions with museum audiences, and affecting the museum’s core operations. This course introduces students to the museum field and explores the impact of media and technology on the museum, including an overview of the historical role of the museum in society and an examination of the current uses and effects of digitization, the Internet, and wireless technologies in these institutions, as well as basic concepts underlying the planning of a technology project for a museum. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.601 to meet the requirement.

    460.604.81 - Introduction to Museum Education

    Phyllis Hecht

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces students to the critical and fundamental educational function of museums, the core responsibilities of museum educators, and the impact of museum education practices in a pluralistic society. We review theories of how people learn, current teaching practices in museums, and the unique roles that objects play in an informal learning environment. We analyze the wide range of audiences for education programs, approaches to developing museum programs and interpretive projects, and strategies for measuring success. We learn how museum educators advocate for and activate diverse perspectives internally and externally in order to make museums more inclusive, empathetic, and user-centered.

    460.606.81 - Exhibition Strategies

    Richard Kissel

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces the diverse strategies and approaches used in exhibition planning, development and implementation. It asks students to think critically about exhibitions and the interface between objects, concept and experience. The course focuses on visitor-centered interpretive design and is applicable to a wide range of institutions. Students spend much of the semester working together in small teams, collaboratively producing a comprehensive exhibition project as they walk through the practical steps in exhibition development and design. Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    460.608.81 - The Business of Museums

    Robert Beatty

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Museums are stewards of cultural patrimony, disseminators of knowledge, and agents of civic and social awareness. They are community icons, places of respite, economic drivers, and centers of informal education and public engagement. In serving these functions, museums must deal within a hyper-competitive entertainment and commercial environment. While they serve the greater good, they must function as businesses. As nonprofits, they cultivate financial and community support from individuals and donors. They also rely on fees, grants, sponsorships, retail operations and other strategies to survive. This course is a journey through the business side of the museum world. Students will explore the range, fundamentals, and subtleties of the museum world including mission, governance, programming, management, finance, fundraising, public relations, legal and ethical issues, technologies, risk management, audience engagement, leadership, and strategic planning, all in the context of current news stories and events.

    460.611.81 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    460.615.81 - Museums and Community Engagement

    Candace Matelic

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course explores how museums and cultural organizations of all sizes can strengthen their relationships with the communities they serve. No longer are museums measured and judged solely by their internal resources—collections, endowments, facilities, and staff—but rather by the external benefits and value they create for individuals and communities. Growing numbers of museums are learning to make their organizations more meaningful and relevant by involving their communities in ongoing planning and decision-making. They are reframing museum activities to focus on what matters to their communities. By getting involved in community challenges and developing new partnerships, they are identifying underserved audiences and creating memorable visitor experiences. As museums begin this journey towards community engagement, they are initiating and facilitating social change and moving towards social entrepreneurship. This course includes the theory and skills of community engagement, drawing on both research and practice for examples.

    460.618.81 - Museum Controversies: Ethical Issues in Museums

    Arthur Molella

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Museum directors, curators, and other staffers have faced an array of political and ethical dilemmas in an increasingly contentious environment. This course explores the historical, political, and cultural backgrounds to controversies surrounding exhibitions such as the Smithsonian’s display of the Enola Gay, the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s “Sensation,” the British Museum’s Elgin Marbles, and the showing of illegally acquired antiquities at various art museums. Nationalism, religious beliefs, obscenity, and “edutainment” are among the issues discussed.

    460.620.81 - Accessibility in the Museum

    Mary McGinnis

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Making museums and their information and collections accessible to people with disabilities concerns more than ramps and restrooms. People with disabilities can encounter barriers to every aspect of the museum experience, from finding out about exhibitions and educational offerings before a visit through advertising or the museum’s website; to getting to, into and around the museum galleries and other public spaces; to hearing tours and lectures, reading labels and signs, and using interactive tools; to participating in educational programs. This course will introduce students to the key concepts and issues associated with making museums accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities.

    460.621.81 - Museum Evaluation and Audience Research

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course explores audience research and evaluation theory, methodologies, and practical implementation in museums and similar environments. The class explores the three main stages of research and evaluation - front end, formative and summative - and what can be achieved at each stage, with a focus on exhibition and program evaluation. Each semester a museum client presents a real project; in small groups students develop clear research questions, an evaluation plan, an interview tool and an observation tool, all in conjunction with the client. A final presentation ensures the client’s evaluation needs are met and workable tools have been created. Students also spend time developing individual projects for their own museums, or museums in their communities. Emphasis is given on evaluating the holistic visitor experience, examining what is working and what is not - educationally, physically, and socially. This course is useful to all museum professionals, in any role within a museum, whether you plan to conduct, oversee, or in any way participate in audience research and evaluation.

    460.622.81 - Evaluation Projects and Practice

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Building on the successful introductory evaluation course, this more advanced course will allow students who have completed the initial course to develop and complete a full evaluation project. It will emphasize hands-on application, including tool development, data collection, data management, and data analysis. Students will begin with a project in their community, they will develop evaluation questions and an overall evaluation plan, collect a rigorous sample size, and then analyze and present their findings in both written and oral final presentations. Prerequisite: Evaluation Theory & Techniques for Museums (460.621)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: Evaluation Theory & Techniques for Museums (460.621)

    460.630.81 - Exhibition Design, Construction, and Documentation

    David Whitemyer

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Understanding the exhibition design process, from concept to implementation, is valuable not just for exhibition developers, but also for registrars, curators and museum educators. Looking beyond artifacts, storyline and aesthetics, this course examines the rarely explored, but essential, aspects of exhibition design, from drawings and specifications to contracting and installation. Topics will include drawing packages and project documentation, schedules, client and developer responsibilities, project budget, architectural coordination, fabrication techniques, and legal and practical contracting considerations. As with general construction, the exhibition designers and fabricators follow industry standards, and whether a museum is a public or private organization, specific rules must be followed for solicitation and contracting. Prerequisite: Exhibition Strategies (460.606)

    Prerequisite: Exhibition Strategies (460.606)

    460.633.81 - Conservation-Restoration: A 21st Century Approach to Museums and Heritage

    Daniel Cull
    Rose Cull

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Conservation-Restoration has existed for hundreds of years, and conservators have been active in museums and the heritage industry since their inception. This course will explore the history of conservation-restoration, how it has changed over time, where it is today and where it might be going tomorrow. Students will become fluent in conservation-restoration research methods and publishing sources, able to identify good sources for information, and to understand the ethical issues in the field. The Getty Art and Archaeological Technical Abstracts (AATA) Online have partnered with this course to provide material for students to review, abstract, and publish on their online bibliographical database. The final project will be the culmination of a semester’s worth of research and writing about a conservation-restoration or collections topic and presented as an encyclopedic article in Wikipedia.org. On completion of this course students will be able to call themselves a Wikipedian and a Getty AATA abstractor and they will have a working knowledge of the field of conservation-restoration as it applies to museums and the heritage industry. Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666).

    Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    460.635.81 - Curatorship: Principles and Practices

    Stephanie Brown

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Whether the museum is large or small, public or private, has several curatorial departments or a single director/curator, it must have a way to fulfill its curatorial obligations. Everyone in the museum should understand the institution’s curatorial responsibilities, and every museum should have a curatorial strategy suited to its collection and/or its exhibitions. In this course, students will study principles and practices relating to core curatorial functions and learn about the relationship of curatorship to the museum’s mission, ethical and other challenges facing museums, and how technology is changing the ways museums fulfill their curatorial responsibilities. Students will draft a position description for today’s curator, write an acquisition proposal, present an exhibition proposal, and visit museums to critique specific curatorial practices.

    460.638.81 - Preservation of Analog and Digital Photographs

    Millard Schisler

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course will explore the main principles in caring for analog and digital photographic collections. It has been designed as a broad approach to the subject, but with enough depth to give the student an approach to the care for photographic collections with both historical and natively born digital photographs. This course will provide this insight from looking at the materials that photographs are composed of, understanding the materials and environment that they are housed in, and the technologies and workflows needed to care for analog and natively born digital photographs for long-term preservation. Students will be required to build and present a case study and a final project discussing a topic related to the course.

    460.657.81 - Fundamentals of Museum Fundraising

    Rosalia Crosby

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Through a combination of current and historical readings, case studies, discussions, and written assignments based on “real-life” scenarios, this course will cover general fundraising strategies and ethics, ePhilanthropy, prospect research, grant writing, annual and capital campaigns, corporate giving and cause marketing, special events and stewardship.

    460.662.81 - Developing Museum Web Projects

    Dana Allen-Greil

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    How can museums best use the web to further their missions? What are the best practices for planning and sustaining high-quality online projects? In this course, students will survey the application of online technologies for various purposes, including collections, education, exhibition, fundraising, collaboration, and marketing projects. The bulk of the coursework will focus on researching and creating the components of a Web project plan (for a project of the student's own choice and design). Students will gain hands-on experience with audience research and usability testing, articulating technology solutions to match desired goals, developing information architecture, building a basic online prototype, crafting a marketing and evaluation plan, and pitching a project idea for funding. A range of online technologies will be considered including websites, blogs, email newsletters, mobile applications, and social media.

    460.666.81 - Collection Management

    Carlos Hernandez

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    460.668.81 - Cataloging Museum Collections: History, Standards, and Applications

    Kate Collen

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Cultural heritage institutions – including museums, libraries, and archives – have as core responsibilities the safeguarding of the objects in their care and the education of the public about these objects. To support both of these responsibilities, one of the foundational activities of cultural heritage professionals is the cataloging of the objects in their collections. This course will provide both an overview and practicum of cataloging definitions, philosophies, standards, and practices. Recordkeeping methods, numbering systems and data formats will be emphasized, and professionally accepted standards for cataloging various cultural objects will be reviewed. Discussion of the broad application of cataloging data sets, including cross collection aggregation and search, delivery to the public, and Web 2.0 and 3.0 delivery methods will be covered. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to take Collection Management (460.666) before enrolling in this course.

    460.670.81 - Digital Preservation

    Riccardo Ferrante

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces students to the current state of digital preservation, preservation challenges, and basic concepts for designing effective digital preservation plans and programs. Topics include the relevance of digital preservation for museums; archival principles that inform preservation practices; standards and policies; considerations in preservation strategies; issues relating to formats, repositories, and processes; and emerging preservation solutions and services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.671.81 - Foundations of Digital Curation

    Joyce Ray

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course lays a foundation for managing digital information throughout its life cycle by introducing students to the emerging field of digital curation and by examining the practical issues and tools involved in managing digital collections and repositories over time. Topics include metadata schemas for describing digital assets in different disciplines; sharing digital content beyond the institution to reach wider audiences; requirements for trustworthy repository services; management of research data; policy issues; and user services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.674.81 - Digital Curation Research Paper

    Joyce Ray

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    The supervised research course enables students to investigate a significant problem or issue in digital curation and to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills. Ideally, the research paper will build on the student’s internship experience. The research paper is expected to result in a publishable or presentable paper that makes a contribution to the literature and field of digital curation. As there is currently a significant need for research in digital curation, and relatively little published literature—especially relating to museums—student research in this program can make a major contribution, and graduates will be prepared for careers as leaders in the field. Course work, assignments, and meetings with a faculty member will take place in an online course environment. The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    Note: The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    460.684.81 - Museums, Finance, and the Economy

    Douglas Robertson

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course examines how changes in the economy can affect museum income, expenditures, fundraising, endowments and attendance. It explores how various museum practices can mitigate the effects of a weak economy and capitalize on a strong economy. Through case studies of large and small museums, students examine information sources that managers use to identify changes in the local, regional, and national economy, which might affect their institutions. Students gain familiarity with economic and museum financial information by adopting two museums and tracking how changes in their finances and attendance relate to shifts in the economy. This course is critical for all students interested in the “behind-the-scenes” of museum management, including those with little or no background in finance or economics.

    460.685.81 - Private Collectors, Collections, and Museums

    Barbara Chamberlain

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    An increasingly significant amount of our cultural and historical heritage is in private collections and outside the protective sphere of public institutions. Numbering in the tens of thousands in just the U.S., private collections span a great variety of objects reflecting the wide range of enthusiasts who collect them. This course will explore private collectors and trends in their collecting plus the similarities and differences between public and private collections and museums. It will help prepare students for the unique challenges they may face, illustrated by real world examples and interviews with collectors, curators, collections managers, and service providers plus hands-on experience. It will include developing problem solving strategies and project management skills they can use to adapt and implement institutional ethics and best practices, especially as private collections evolve into public museums. Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    460.686.81 - Culturally Specific Museums

    Redell Hearn

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Museums have the potential to provide safe spaces for comprehensive cultural inquiry. Culturally specific museums provide strategic platforms for showcasing diverse sets of art, history and culture with the intention of reaching a broad set of visitors. This course examines the significance of culturally specific museums, both individually and in relation to mainstream museums, to better understand how public culture engages issues of art, history, aesthetics, religion, ethnicity, and politics. Through the combination of contemporary reading material, survey of six national culturally specific museums, synchronous and a-synchronous discussion forums and guest speakers, students will discuss some of the ways in which culturally specific museums help make up the fabric of culture represented in museums in the United States of America.

    460.687.81 - Provenance Research: Connecting Histories

    Judith Barr
    Jacquelyn Clements

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Every object has a story and a history, and the study of objects and their contexts form the basis for provenance research. This course will expose students to the historical context of collecting around the world and will explore the various roles that provenance research plays in museums today, including within the realms of collections management, acquisitions, visitor engagement, publications, legal issues, and more. We will consider not only what provenance research is, but how it can be used as a valuable method for understanding the biography of an object, including its provenience, acquisition, and movement through time and space through a series of events and transactions. By focusing on specific areas of various fields of study, we will examine the overlapping but often distinct ways that provenance research can be utilized and what it can reveal. Through hands-on activities and representative case studies, students will undertake their own provenance research in order to understand the process and methodologies of a discipline that often encompasses many facets of inquiry and avenues of investigation.

  • Off-Site or International

    460.610.91 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    Dean Krimmel

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/22 - 5/5

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Baltimore Seminar: March 16-27, 2019 Note: students must have completed 2 courses to enroll (one of which is 460.601 or 460.602); Registration dates: Oct. 31-Dec. 9, 2019; Tuition $4292 + fee $750; fee non-refundable after Dec. 9.

    460.610.92 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    Gail Ringel

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/22 - 5/5

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Boston Seminar: March 16-27, 2019. Note: students must have completed 2 courses to enroll (one of which is 460.601 or 460.602); Registration dates: Oct. 31-Dec. 9, 2019; Tuition $4292 + fee $750; fee non-refundable after Dec. 9.

    460.673.91 - Digital Curation Certificate Internship

    Joyce Ray

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/22 - 5/5

    The internship, including at least 120 hours of field experience, affords students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with experts who are leading digital curation activities in museums and related cultural heritage organizations in the U.S. and abroad. The internship is a partnership between the university and the host institution, and is customized to meet each student’s needs and career goals. The program will assist students in arranging appropriate internships. Student interns will produce evidence of their accomplishments through work products, project reports, or other documentation in an online course component and will participate in online discussion forums with other students enrolled in digital curation internships during the same semester. The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    460.750.91 - Museum Internship

    Judith Landau

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/22 - 5/5

    An internship at a student’s local museum, approved by the internship coordinator, may be substituted for one elective course. To fulfill the internship requirement, a student must complete a minimum of 80 hours of work onsite and a project, (either a research paper or a practical product) on an approved topic related to his/her experience, due at the end of the semester. Students also participate in online discussion and course work during the semester. Before registering for the internship option, the student should contact the internship coordinator for approval. At least four to six weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place, the student must submit: 1) a description of the internship weekly duties including activities and/or responsibilities; 2) learning objectives and goals; 3) why this experience should be part of the Museum Studies degree; and 4) a signed letter of commitment from the internship supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

    Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

  • Off-Site or International (Cross-Listed)

    465.708.91 - Two-Week Onsite Cultural Heritage Management Seminar

    Charles Gentry

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/2 - 1/21

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground heritage management study in a location organized by the MA in Cultural Heritage Management program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities related to site management, heritage tourism, and conservation, alongside classroom sessions that integrate daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of the designated location, the seminar provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and heritage experts, and explore the latest in cultural heritage practice. Students work on directed activities during the two-week period, coupled with multiple site visits focused on the academic work being accomplished. In order to register for this course, students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are recommended. Students are strongly encouraged to take 465.702, 465.704 and 465.707. Some seminars may have other specific requirements. Individual course descriptions will be posted for each location. An individual course description will be posted for each location. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (465.780) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Field Trip/ Seminar Fees: $500 San Antonio, TX- Two-WEEK ONSITE SEMINAR- January 6-17, 2020. The cost of the onsite seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class in the Cultural Heritage Management Program which is $4163.00 a class. There is an additional $500 seminar field trip fee for the San Antonio seminar. The fee is not refundable after October 25, 2019. Registration: Students will register for this course (AS.465.708.91) in SIS (https://sis.jhu.edu). This course needs 13 students to run. (Registration: September 16- October 25, 2019).

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    465.704.81 - Cultural Heritage Management/Leadership

    Donald Jones

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    Cultural heritage management is a complex intersection of theory and practice. This course will explore issues related to cultural sector management and leadership. Through the lens of current practice, we will examine core theoretical concepts and tools, including traditional approaches as well as the incorporation of emergent technology. We will look closely at the roles of the cultural manager and the proficiencies and characteristics needed for effective management and leadership within the cultural sector. We will consider changing definitions of protection and stewardship as they relate to cultural heritage as well as a larger framing of public interest, what publics, which interests.

    465.707.81 - Reading the Landscape: Cultural Heritage at Scale

    Brenda Barrett

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course examines the unique challenges faced by academics and practitioners in defining, preserving and managing rural, natural, and urban heritage at a landscape scale. The multiplicity of interests involved add to the complexity and require robust engagement strategies. Students will use a regional, national and international perspective to derive best practices for understanding the breadth of the cultural landscape concept and the opportunities for its sustainable development. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in the Two-Week Onsite Cultural Heritage Management Seminar (465.708).

    465.730.81 - Heritage Interpretation

    Sarah Chicone

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    Interpretation is a key component of cultural heritage management and the visible link between heritage and its diverse publics. This course considers current practice and emerging developments in the field as well as a broad range of heritage both tangible and intangible: from museums and sites, to archeological excavations, to urban and rural landscapes, and both the natural and built environment. It asks students to evaluate the role of interpretation in site management and looks critically at interpretation across global landscapes considering both the intended and unintended consequences of chosen narratives. This course looks closely at audience and community, the control of narrative and interpretation, and the short and long-term impact in terms of identity and access. As well as discusses the skills identified across the sector for heritage interpreters and how they are used to create effective experiences.

    465.740.81 - Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age

    Douglas Pritchard

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    A Neolithic settlement in Scotland, at risk due to coastal erosion, is digitally preserved through precise 3D laser scanning; the construction of the massive towers at Cologne Cathedral is brought to life with digital photogrammetry and augmented reality; multilayered cultural heritage information, images, and damage assessments are catalogued in open source databases. These are just a few examples of how a growing number of scholars, researchers, and practitioners are using the latest technology as a means to document, visualize, interpret, and preserve cultural heritage worldwide.

    This course will explore the ways in which cultural heritage professionals are implementing the latest digital technologies to enhance research, conservation, management and preservation of tangible and intangible heritage, as well as methods of education and engagement for visitors. Through lectures, readings, assignments, and social media, students will identify, analyze and debate the use of documentation, visualization and content creation technology currently being used in the cultural heritage engagement, studies and practice, as well as envision its use for the future.