Course Schedule

Please also see the list of Geographic Information Systems courses. You may take any of these courses, except Capstone for Geographic Information Systems, as an elective. These courses also count toward the concentration in Geospatial Analysis. Please take note of the prerequisites for these courses as well as the technology requirements. Most of the GIS software runs on Windows. If you’re using a Mac, your computer must be able to simulate Windows. More information can be found here.

Please note that the MS in Government Analytics is an interdisciplinary program. If there is a course offered through Johns Hopkins that you would like to apply to your program but is not listed below, contact Dr. Bachner to determine if the course is indeed appropriate and to secure approval.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Government Analytics courses.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    Donald Laird

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/2 - 8/18

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.627.51 - Financial Management & Analysis in the Public Sector

    Mary Conley

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/1 - 7/8
    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/27 - 7/8

    This course focuses on financial aspects of public sector organizations and institutions. The objectives of this course include helping students (1) learn the basics of public sector accounting and the construction of their financial reports, (2) become more intelligent users of the financial statements of public sector organizations such as sovereign, state, and municipal institutions, and (3) better understand the factors that affect the financial condition and financial performance of such entities.

    More specifically, the course focuses on (1) the financial reporting concepts and standards that are applicable to public sector organizations; (2) ratios and other summary indicators used by analysts to evaluate the financial condition and financial performance of public sector and nonprofit organizations; (3) the analysis and interpretation of financial statements of selected public sector organizations; (4) fundamental finance principles; and 5) basic principles of budget formulation.

    This is a core course for the MA in Public Management program.

    470.653.51 - Russian National Security Policy

    Donald Jensen

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 7/13 - 8/17
    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 7/8 - 8/12

    Russia plays a key role in most international issues and openly campaigns to realign the international system away from what it sees as American domination. This course considers the substance and process of Russian national security policy. It acquaints students with the main instruments and mechanisms available to Russian leaders to advance the country’s national interests and key policy priorities. The course considers how Russia formulates and conducts its national security policy, the history that informs it, the political culture that sustain it, the ideas and interests that drive it, and the people and institutions responsible for it. The course addresses Russia’s role in key global and regional issues and its relations with major powers. It places special emphasis on the wars in Ukraine and Syria, Russian concepts of information war, and on Russian military reform.

    470.668.51 - The Politics and Process of American Foreign Policy

    John Gans

    Thursday 5:45 - 9:00; 5/28 - 8/13

    Overuse is not the only problem with the maxim that American “politics stop at the water’s edge.” The slogan has simply never been true. American foreign policy has always been a result not just of the crises and opportunities the nation has faced but its unique politics and policy processes. American national interests are determined through the democratic processes established by the Constitution and other legislation and affected by the politics that drive the nation’s elections, its conversations and its foreign policies. These politics and processes have been remarkably consistent since the founding even as the nation’s interests have grown significantly. A better understanding of both the politics and processes of American foreign policy will help students appreciate how the country’s policies are made today and will be made in the future.

    470.706.51 - American Military History from the World Wars to Today

    Kevin Woods

    Monday 6:30 - 9:45; 6/1 - 7/1
    Wednesday 6:30 - 9:45; 5/27 - 7/6

    This course familiarizes students with the general contours of US national security strategy and military policy from the First World War through the so-called “Long War” era of Iraq and Afghanistan. The United States has a long, complex, and increasingly dysfunctional relationship with the use of violence in pursuit of policy aims (war). The institutions of the United States with responsibility for war-making have, over the past century, been shaped by powerful forces of change and continuity as the US adapts to the evolving character of war. Students will develop an appreciation for these factors that have shaped US security policy since WWI, be able to frame current policy debates in that context, and be able to forecast potential implications for the decades ahead.

    470.725.51 - China's Impact on Global Security

    Jennifer Staats

    TTh 6:00 - 9:10; 5/27 - 7/7

    As China's role on the international stage continues to grow, how will its behavior affect the dynamics of global peace and security? Beijing has long espoused a principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of other states, but China is becoming a more central player in efforts to address global security challenges. China's diplomatic outreach in Afghanistan and the Middle East, economic investments in Pakistan and Burma, increased participation in peacekeeping operations, and more vocal presence in multilateral institutions all reflect the country’s expanding influence. Students will put themselves into the position of national security leaders in China, in the United States, and in third countries to explore a range of national interests, priorities, objectives, strategies, and policy tools.

    470.761.51 - Thucydides, International Politics, and War

    Andrew Novo

    Thursday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/28 - 7/2
    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/1 - 7/6

    Using the Peloponnesian War as a case study, this course will examine critical aspects of domestic and international politics and their influence on war. It will consider how systemic factors, strategy, alliances, and domestic politics impact the origins, conduct, and termination of conflict. It will also explore the tactical and human factors in ancient Greek warfare. The class will meet via live Zoom teleconferencing.

    470.785.51 - Nuclear Proliferation and Non-Proliferation

    Peter Almquist

    TTh 6:00 - 9:10; 7/8 - 8/18

    Since 1945, eight states have tested nuclear weapons, and perhaps two dozen others have started -- and stopped nuclear weapons programs. This course considers why some countries pursue nuclear weapons and why others forgo them, an issue that bedevils both policymakers, who concerned about the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and political scientists, who attempt to explain and predict it. The class will delve into past and present examples, discussing and evaluating theories of why states pursue such weapons, the technologies that make it possible, and the policy tools available to prevent it. We will also draw on the parallel efforts to control chemical weapons, biological weapons, and ballistic missiles.

    470.800.51 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/2 - 8/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    This is the final course of the program and will meet in person but is also available via Zoom for distant students on Tuesdays, 6:00 pm EST.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    Matthew Eckel

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/1 - 8/17

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    470.856.51 - Research Study Continuation

    Mark Stout
    Sarah O'Byrne

    Wednesday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/27 - 8/12

    This is a non-credit course required for students in the MA in Global Security Studies program who have completed all of their course work and have taken 470.855 Research Study Seminar but who are still working on their research study. There is a fee associated with this course.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    Paul Weinstein

    Wednesday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/27 - 8/12

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    This is a non-credit, ungraded courses that is for MA in Public Management and MS in Government Analytics students who have taken an incomplete in their capstone seminars.

  • Online Courses

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    Douglas Harris

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    John Gans

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.605.81 - Global Political Economy

    Charles Larkin

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.605.82 - Global Political Economy

    Charles Larkin

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.606.81 - U.S. Security in a Disordered World

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course provides an overview of the manifold challenges and opportunities for United States security in the current disordered and changing world. It aims to help students assess why events occur and what policies are developed in response. In that endeavor, the course has three major objectives. First, the course will review the major perspectives on, and debates about, U.S. security and the institutions through which policy is made and executed. Second, the course will review some U.S. security issues through scholarly, policy, political, and historical lenses. Third, the course will help students write for both policy and academic audiences. This course is not open to students who have had 470.606 American National Security.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.608.81 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for students in the Public Management program.

    470.608.82 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    Arielle Kane

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.609.81 - Leadership Skills in the 21st Century

    Michael Siegel

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course will assist leaders in identifying their personal approach to leadership; provide tips on motivating staff by building trusting relationships and shoring up their credibility; suggest influence and persuasion strategies that leaders need to employ when working with bosses, colleagues, direct reports, and critical stakeholders, including funding agencies; develop strategies to build effective work teams; and consider approaches to monitor organizational performance in an ongoing fashion.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.611.81 - Introduction to Terrorism Studies

    Elena Mastors

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course provide an overview of the principal areas important to the study of terrorism. The course offers a variety of academic, policy, and operational models, theories, approaches, and concepts regarding the definitions of terrorism, the nature and functioning of various terrorist groups across the globe, and a variety of domestic and international governmental operational and policy responses. Through this exploration, students will be able to identify patterns of behavior of both terrorist groups and governmental responses, and will also be able to identify gaps, and principal areas of improvements in how we understand, and respond to this important security challenge.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.625.81 - Resource Development and Marketing in Nonprofits

    Karen Osborne

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The goal of this course is to prepare future nonprofit leaders and board members with the international resource development and marketing fundamentals that help every nonprofit thrive. The course focuses on how to create and nurture an organizational culture where everyone on the staff and board understands, embraces, and acts on his or her role in developing strategic relationships with funders, potential funders, and media professionals. You will gain an understanding of the process, the metrics that drive the process, and the milestone markers that lead to success. You will explore how to develop a board and/or cadre of volunteers who give generously, share expertise freely, connect you to the right government officials and media leaders, and invite others to join them. Data-driven decision-making and all aspects of fund development, marketing, and communications will be woven throughout the course. Led by an internationally recognized practitioner, consultant, and master teacher, the course will use scenarios, discussion, social media, audio, and video clips so that you will walk away with the knowledge you need to secure private and government funding and social capital as a CEO, senior staff member, board chair, or member, and the confidence to do it all well. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.631.81 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management program.

    470.631.82 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.632.81 - Security Issues in South Asia

    Syed Ali

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The South Asian region, with its complex historical context, a large and diverse population, and contested national borders, especially between nuclearized countries, poses some of the toughest security challenges facing the world. This course highlights salient security challenges in South Asia, and draws out their implications for U.S. strategic interests. It examines the sources and implications of the rivalry between nuclearized India and Pakistan, and how it fuels Sino-Indian security competition. Attention is drawn to the sources of militancy in India, and to the threats to international and regional security arising from the conflict in Afghanistan. The Sri Lankan Tamil Tiger insurgency and its eventual defeat in 2009 are also discussed, alongside the rising Islamist militancy threats in Bangladeshi, and the history of Maoist insurgency in Nepal. Finally, some of the climate-based threats to which no South Asian country is immune will also be discussed.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.643.81 - Text as Data

    Janis Butkevics

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    In this course students will develop expertise in using the tools necessary to collect, analyze, and visualize large amounts of text. The course begins with a hands-on introduction to the programming concepts necessary to collect and process textual data. The course then proceeds to cover key statistical concepts in machine learning and statistics that are used to analyze text as data. Throughout the course, students will develop a research project that culminates in the display of results from a large-scale textual analysis.

    Text as Data is heavily focused on applying machine learning and statistical methods to data using the R programming language. Students should be very comfortable with R and functions such as manipulating text files, row and column wise operations and using 3rd party packages. Students should also be able to independently debug basic errors and be able to leverage R package documentation.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Strongly recommended: 470.768 Programming and Data Management (see skill requirements described above if you have not taken this course).

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis. IMPORTANT NOTE: At a minimum, students in this course should have some programming experience with R and must have a basic understanding of statistical concepts like distributions, model-based inference, and uncertainty.

    470.649.81 - Separation of Powers and Democratic Governance

    Ken Masugi

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The separation of powers is America’s most profound and useful political contribution to the world. Studying its principles, development, and decay is a requirement for understanding American politics and is as well a potential benefit to students of aspiring democracies throughout the world. For the separation of powers enables self-government, putting democratic principles of equality and liberty into practice while moderating the powers of majorities. We will study the principles and practice of the separation of powers by examining how each elected branch of government protects its rights, while checking the rights of others. The separation of powers can be said to have produced a more just and moderate democratic form of government, but it has also occasioned the complaint that it has produced gridlock and incompetence. To investigate the strengths and drawbacks of the separation of powers, we will pay close attention to the classic texts advocating the separation of powers, such as The Federalist Papers; the great changes in American politics effected by the Civil War, the Progressive movement, and the New Deal; and the domestic and foreign policy debates in recent administrations. Special attention will be paid to the seminal opinions of the unelected branch of American government, the Supreme Court. The course will note in particular the contemporary challenges to the separation of powers, evidenced in the rise of the administrative state, the expanding powers of courts, and the growth of party government. We will also note instances of how parliamentary and presidential governments throughout the world might benefit from separation of powers principles.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.661.81 - Political Debates and the US Constitution

    Ryan Emenaker

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course explores the political struggles that emerge from the U.S. constitutional system. During the course, we will read contemporary and classic cases in U.S. constitutional law in light of constitutional and political theory. Course discussions will focus on the law as well as the related policy, political, and societal implications of constitutional interpretation. Through paying particular attention to recent decisions and issues before the Court, the course will explore the roles and powers of the branches of federal government, separation of powers, federalism, and the commerce clause. It will also cover individual rights, due process, equal protection, and religious freedoms.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.673.81 - Data Visualization

    Holly Brasher

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course instructs students in various visualization techniques and software. Students will learn how to: (1) ask interesting questions about politics, (2) identify data that can be used to answer those questions, (3) collect, clean and document the data, (4) explore and analyze the data with statistical and graphical techniques, (5) create compelling, informative and accurate visualizations and (6) present these visualizations to educated audiences. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.679.81 - Armed Social Movements: Terrorism Insurgency and Crime

    Hans Ucko

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Drawing on the social movement literature, this course examines the emergence of irregular armed groups and their decisions to use violence. It explains how social movements turnviolent, how violence dictates their nature, and what this nature can tell us in terms of group strengths and weaknesses. It provides the students with the analytical tools needed to distinguish between terrorism, insurgency, and crime – by focusing and understanding group strategies, behavior, and capabilities. Students will thus be familiarized with the theory on armed group formation and evolution – but the course goes further, by counterposing such theory to the complexities of practice through the consideration of key case studies. The course ends with an overview of state strategies intended to counter a wide variety of threats. Particular attention is paid to the notion of operational art and lines of effort to underline the potential and meaning of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.682.81 - Mission Meets Profit: Building a Social Enterprise

    Lucyna Jodlowska

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    The goal of this course is a comprehensive examination of social enterprises- organizations that, broadly speaking, “apply commercial strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being”. Social enterprises are a relatively new, 21st century phenomenon, and are typically referred to as hybrids of nonprofits and for-profits. While they are similar to nonprofits in that their missions and social and/or environmental objectives drive their very existence, social enterprises can have different structures than traditional 501©3s- some much more complex, legally and otherwise. Throughout the course we will learn about the various types of social enterprises that exist, comparing US models to models operating internationally, and analyze their pros and cons, challenges and opportunities. We will also explore how social enterprises challenge traditional business and nonprofit paradigms, what role social enterprises have come to play in international development, and finally, how to go about developing your own social enterprise. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.688.81 - Political Institutions and the Policy Process

    Douglas Harris

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Bridging the divide between political science theories of policymaking and the actual workings of the policy process in the institutions of national government, this course examines the individual contributions of each of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as well as the interactions and struggles between those branches. How do these various institutions set the policy agenda, develop and deliberate policy alternatives, make authoritative policy decisions, and implement those decisions? In what ways are the interactions between these institutions best considered conflict or cooperation? Also, how do outside actors and institutions -- the media, interest groups, public opinion, parties and campaigns -- affect policymaking in these various institutional settings? Drawing on the Constitutional design and historical development of these institutions as well as contemporary practice, this course examines the purposes, processes, and outcomes of policymaking from an institutional perspective.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    Jason Fritz

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.692.82 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    Jason Fritz

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    Technology Fee; $200.00

    470.695.81 - Proseminar: Essentials of Public and Private Management

    Jeremy Kirkland

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (The purpose of the class is to help equip students to operate effectively in both the public and private sectors. The class will cover three major topics: (1) an overview of managing public and private organizations, with special attention to their differing missions, capabilities, and environments; (2) a survey of important relationships between the public and private sectors; and (3) the need for improved coordination between the public and private sectors to achieve important public purposes. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge in the context of the issues discussed. Students will be expected to complete a significant paper on a relevant topic approved by the instructor. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA program)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for students in the Public Management program.

    470.697.81 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.698.81 - American Exceptionalism

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course will seek to give students a deeper understanding of where the idea of American exceptionalism comes from and what its implications are for America, both domestically and abroad. Students will gain this understanding from reading classic works in the area that trace America’s political development, starting with its Puritan heritage. Early American works will be studied from this period, along with Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. Seminal works of modern political science scholarship on this question will also be assigned, including works from Seymour Martin Lipset, Louis Hartz, Daniel Boorstin, and others. The course will then extrapolate from these historic roots to contemporary issues of America’s foreign policy and rationale for its foreign interventions. The course will conclude with questions of America’s standing in the world, which has in recent years, declined and seek to understand why this is so and what it means for the future understanding of American exceptionalism.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance as well as Security Studies.

    470.700.81 - Cloud Computing in the Public Sector

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course provides insights into how to utilize shared cloud computing resources through a service provider. These resources can be storage space, software as a service, or compute servers. This is a hands-on course in which students will access a variety of cloud services and work with different cloud providers such as Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon. Students will set up virtual servers, work with cloud file storage, learn about a variety of cloud collaboration options, and much more. This practical course will help students make the transition to working in the cloud from any device, anywhere, anytime. All areas of the public sector, such as education, healthcare and law enforcement, increasingly use cloud computing both to deliver information to clients and share information within and across agencies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.714.81 - Contemporary Politics of Latin America

    Guillaume Long

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course covers the politics of Latin America from 1945 to the present. It is designed to introduce students to the academic study of contemporary Latin American politics. Students are required to apply comparative methods of analysis to contrast regimes and political phenomena beyond governments. Students are expected to compare the institutions, policies and development models of different governments and regimes, as well as the ideology, program, organizational structure and support base of different social movements and political parties. These comparisons enable students to explore both similarity and difference. Students may identify broad commonalities in the politics of a region that shares many cultural features and important structural constraints. However, they should also be aware of distinctions; including the important differences between Central America, the Andean region and the Southern Cone, as well as significant variations between neighboring states.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a new course offering that counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.721.81 - Comparative Federalism: The United States and the European Union

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Federalism the division of power and sovereignty between a central authority and local governments has emerged as one of the most important themes of contemporary Western politics in both the United States and Europe. For the United States the division of power between the Federal and State governments lies at the very heart of the American Constitution. At the same time disputes over the precise balance of Federal and State power has been a major fault line in American politics since Federalists and anti-Federalists at the time of the founding. For Europe the destruction of two World Wars showed the destructive side of nationalism and acted as an impetus to leverage Europe’s common history and cultural inheritance to forge a supranational political and economic union dedicated to peace and prosperity. Since the end of the Cold War and the Treaty of Maastricht the process of European integration has speeded up rapidly resulting in a common European currency as well as common legal and political institutions. At the same time concerns about the perceived loss of sovereignty, national identity, and democratic accountability have led in some places to backlashes against Brussels and resurgent nationalism. There is also the broader question of the European Union’s goals and identity is it principally an economic union or is it a super-state in the making? In this course we will explore Federalism in its institutional, legal, philosophical, and historical aspects in both America and Europe.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.723.81 - Western Political and Constitutional Thought

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Many of the ideas which shape today´s world- democracy, liberalism, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, nationalism - have their roots in a "great conversation" (Robert Hutchins) that spans some 25 centuries from ancient Greece until today. The conversation motivating the Western tradition has included a set of perennial questions such as: Who ought to rule - and how do we decide? What is the purpose of politics? What is the best form of constitution? What makes political authority legitimate? What is political justice? What is citizenship? This course is intended as a broad survey of some the most influential political thinkers in the intellectual tradition of Europe and America. Among the many who will be examined are : Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Voltaire, Baron de Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Burke, Friedrich Nietzsche, G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    Karin Orr

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.733.81 - Origins and Influence of Public Opinion on American Democracy and Elections

    Emily Ekins

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    In a democracy, the views of citizens are intended to guide lawmakers as they shape public policy. This makes public opinion a central component in the study of democratic politics. In this course, we will investigate the psychological and sociological origins, structure, measurement, and consequences of public opinion. We will investigate the content of what people think on a variety of salient topics from immigration, income inequality, taxes, to the 2020 elections. However, the main purpose of this class is to move beyond the what and examine the why. Why do Americans think what they do about politics? The course will draw from theories in political science and political psychology to examine the organizing structures of political beliefs including identity, self-interest, socialization, personality, values and morality. In turn, the course will examine how these various sources of public opinion impact voting behavior and policy preferences.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.736.81 - Methods of Policy Analytics

    Robert Torongo

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Data analytics are an essential part of program and policy evaluation. Policymakers increasingly rely upon analytics when making critical policy decisions. In this course, students will conduct a variety of policy focused data analyses using R. Students will utilize a variety of descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques to inform the design and execution of a policy. Students will utilize data-driven analysis to produce policy memoranda in a variety of domains relevant to today’s practitioners. A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments.

    A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis. A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments.

    470.747.81 - The FBI and Fusion Centers: Information Sharing in the Post 9/11 World

    Anthony Lang

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines the “fusion” of information gathering and sharing between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the 79 fusion centers in a Post-9/11 World. We will address federal, state, and international law enforcement jurisdictional issues, the balancing of privacy/civil liberties with information collection/dissemination, and overall assistance to state/local authorities during critical incidents. Students will address broad public policy and perception implications inherent in law enforcement activities. Students will also analyze and discuss case studies such as the Las Vegas Concert, the Orlando Night Club, and the San Bernardino shootings to illustrate the need for timely fusion of information between federal and state law enforcement. The readings and videos will include a variety of diverse and opposing viewpoints relative to law enforcement with practicums and simulations to allow debate in “real-world” situations. An important objective is to determine ways to improve upon the current law enforcement landscape and generate possible solutions to ensure seamless and timely information sharing while safeguarding individual rights.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Security Studies for MA in Government Students.

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    Gary Keeley

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course introduces students to the field of intelligence, particularly as practiced in the United States. After a brief overview of the historical foundations of modern intelligence, it discusses how intelligence was conducted during the 20th century including collection, analysis, counterintelligence, covert action, and oversight. It then discusses the disruptive influences of September 11, the Iraq War, and new technologies. The course concludes with a discussion of the “democratization of intelligence."

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.749.81 - Campaigns and Running for Office

    Jason Linde

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    You can see yourself now – taking the oath of office, giving speeches, and making critical decisions impacting thousands or millions of people. But how do you get there? This class provides a practical guide for students who are interested in exploring a run for elected office. Students will learn how to assess if and when they are ready to run, which office to run for, and most importantly, develop the critical skills needed as a candidate to wage and win a contested campaign. These skills include writing a campaign plan and budget, hiring staff and consultants, learning how to fundraise, and working with the media. This class dispels the myth that only those independently wealthy can serve in office by giving students a real understanding of what it takes to run and win.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.756.81 - Understanding Modern War

    Stephen Grenier

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines the phenomenon of modern warfare through both a theoretical and historical lens. It will provide insight into the definitions, origins, objectives, strategies, and tactics of modern conflict. Throughout the course you will analyze recent and ongoing conventional, irregular, and hybrid wars and understand what caused them, how they were conducted, and why they ended the way they did. Through a combination of lecture and online discussion, students will analyze these conflicts from a variety of perspectives to include state security and military forces, insurgents, criminals, and terrorists. Prerequisite: AS.470.692 Military Strategy & National Policy.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.764.81 - Survey Methodology

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is a comprehensive examination of all aspects of designing questionnaires, conducting survey research, and analyzing survey data. The class will cover question construction, measurement, sampling, weighting, response quality, scale and index construction, IRB, ethics, integrity and quality control, modes of data collection (including telephone, mail, face to face and focus groups), post collection processing and quantitative analysis of data (including chi-square and ANOVA), as well as report writing basics.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.768.81 - Programming and Data Management

    Robert Bird

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course introduces students to the R programming language. The R language is one of the most popular tools used today for performing data analytics, statistics, machine learning, data visualization, and much more. By the end of this course, students will understand fundamental programming concepts that apply to all programming languages. These concepts include variables, functions, loops, data structures, and data types. The course will also cover the use of these tools to solve challenging data problems that students may encounter in their academic or professional careers. Note: The course overlaps a bit with 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis, but this course focuses much more heavily on the fundamentals of programming.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.769.81 - Data Science for Public Policy

    Holly Brasher

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful.

    470.773.81 - Energy and Environmental Security

    Paul Sullivan

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines the nexus of energy, natural resources, and the environment with conflict, war, terrorism, crime, development, diplomacy, politics, and technology. Students critically examine the ways that increased competition for environmental and energy resources, strained resources, and changing conditions can threaten national security. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.773.82 - Energy and Environmental Security

    Chad Briggs

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines the nexus of energy, natural resources, and the environment with conflict, war, terrorism, crime, development, diplomacy, politics, and technology. Students critically examine the ways that increased competition for environmental and energy resources, strained resources, and changing conditions can threaten national security. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.774.81 - Nonprofit Governance & Executive Leadership

    Charles Dambach

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course advances our understanding of self-governing nonprofit organizations by focusing on the responsibilities, expectations, challenges, and opportunities of nonprofit boards and their executive leadership. This course covers the basic responsibilities of nonprofit boards according to law, custom, and best practices, and it includes ethical concepts, public attitudes, and contemporary legislative and regulatory issues. The course explores theories of effective governance and executive leadership that have had wide influence, and how ethical considerations relate to perceptions of excellence and shape the way staff and volunteer leaders manage people and money. In the discussions, there will be opportunities to compare the role of boards in US nonprofit groups with those in other countries. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.792.81 - Social Science in National Security and Intelligence

    Todd Helmus

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course examines the role of social science in national security decision making and intelligence. The course lectures, readings and classroom discussion are intended to help students understand the ambivalent relationship between social scientists on the one hand and intelligence personnel and national security policy makers on the other. It also considers the opportunities and limitations in the ways social science could contribute to policy making and how social science has contributed to key national issues. The course will help the student become a savvy consumer of social science.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.795.81 - The Constitution and National Security

    Margaret Williams

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course exams the interpretation of constitutional powers and rights under conditions of heightened national security. We will consider the Supreme Court's role in constitutional interpretation, and the balance of power among the three branches. The course will also examine the tension between security and liberty during a time of war. Topics covered during this semester will include military tribunals, unitary theory of the executive, congressional oversight, war-making power, intelligence authorities, and treatment of detainees.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    Leana Bowman

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    From the perspective of a nonprofit leader, this course provides a solid foundation in understanding key financial tools such as audits, financial statements, budgets and tax documents. Using these tools, students will analyze and assess the financial transparency, accountability, and health of various national and international organizations, determine the financial strengths and weaknesses within those organizations, learn how to use that information in the decision-making process, and finally, practice making informed recommendations to organizational leadership. This course is not designed to make students financial experts or practitioners. Instead, it is designed to enlighten students on key financial management concepts that improve their ability to be informed leaders, participants, and donors in the nonprofit sector. Students will also explore the responsibilities and consequences of international nonprofits engaging in activities in the US, as well as implications for US nonprofits operating abroad. This is an elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    Collin Paschall

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.851.81 - Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    Miriam Matthews

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.851.82 - Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    Kathleen Reedy

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    Adam Wolfson

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.853.81 - Historical Methods

    Jason Ridler

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Historians reclaim, recover, and revise what we know about the past. They enter a dialog with the dead to make sense of our world for the living, knowing full well that their hard-earned results may be overturned with new data, analysis, or insights. Yet questionable or flawed “history” is routinely to justify a range of experiences, policies, and events. In this course, we instill the key skills and analytical framework in which historians use to uncover and recreate the past, taking the journey from question, to research (onsite and online), to argument and revision (and revisionism). The importance of argument, objectivity, personal and temporal bias, evidence, narrative and cultural context are examined in detail, along with case studies of history being used, misused, and abused by historians and other actors.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.855.81 - Research Study Seminar

    Sarah Clark

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    This course is only for students who are completing their capstone projects for the MS in Government Analytics program.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.710 Advanced Quantitative Methods. This course is only for MS in Government Analytics Students who are in their last or next-to-last semester of the program.

    470.864.81 - NGO Management Capstone Seminar


    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Capstone research for the completion of the MA in NGO Management degree.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 5/27 - 8/18

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International

    470.707.91 - International Security and Intelligence

    Kevin Cross

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/31 - 8/16

    This course offers a unique opportunity to work with leading British and American practitioners and academics from the security and intelligence worlds. It considers the claims of state secrecy, the threat of nuclear proliferation, of cyberattack, terrorism, the problems generated by the demand for regional security, and the security challenges of revolutions and governing diversity. Intelligence collection, analysis of the product, and its dissemination to customers remain at the core of the intelligence cycle. Counterintelligence and covert action play more opaque but still vital roles at the heart of the nation state. Understanding these perspectives, what intelligence can achieve, but also its limitations, are major themes. This four-week course is offered at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.

    This onsite course meets at Magdalene College, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, July 5 – July 31, 2020. Costs: $3090 tuition plus $2210 fee. Fees cover lodging with shared bathroom and breakfast plus either lunch or dinner each day, two formal dinners in the College’s medieval dining hall, conference attendance, excursions, and entertainment. Students will be selected to attend this course through a competitive application process. In order to be considered, you must register and pay all costs by March 16. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. (REGISTRATION RUNS: March 9, 2020 at 10:00 am to March 16, 2020 at 11:59 pm)

    470.707.92 - International Security and Intelligence

    Kevin Cross

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/31 - 8/16

    This course offers a unique opportunity to work with leading British and American practitioners and academics from the security and intelligence worlds. It considers the claims of state secrecy, the threat of nuclear proliferation, of cyberattack, terrorism, the problems generated by the demand for regional security, and the security challenges of revolutions and governing diversity. Intelligence collection, analysis of the product, and its dissemination to customers remain at the core of the intelligence cycle. Counterintelligence and covert action play more opaque but still vital roles at the heart of the nation state. Understanding these perspectives, what intelligence can achieve, but also its limitations, are major themes. This four-week course is offered at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.

    This onsite course meets at Magdalene College, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, July 5-July 31, 2020. Costs: $3090 tuition plus $2455. Fees cover lodging with private bathroom and breakfast plus either lunch or dinner each day, two formal dinners in the College’s medieval dining hall, conference attendance, excursions, and entertainment. Students will be selected to attend this course through a competitive application process. In order to be considered, you must register and pay all costs by March 16, 2020. (REGISTRATION RUNS: March 9, 2020 at 10:00 am to March 26, 2020 at 11:59 pm)

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.608.81 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Rhey Solomon
    Helen Serassio

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.668.81 - Sustainable Food Systems

    Antoinette WinklerPrins

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    This course considers the environmental and social challenges of providing a sustainable global food system. We will investigate the geographic patterns of agricultural and food production systems, emphasizing contemporary patterns and how these came to be. Attention will be given to agricultural systems from the local to the global scale and we will consider the global distribution of production and consumption of agricultural products. The impacts of global change issues such as climate change, energy crops, population growth, and urbanization on food production will be also be part of the course. Offered online or onsite, annually.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.602.81 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.645.81 - Global Energy Policy

    Liam Phelan

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    Energy policy is about more than sheer market design. Policy agendas have become increasingly complex, adding sustainability and development to traditional energy security concerns. In response, a patchwork of institutional frameworks has emerged, including clubs (OPEC, IEA), treaties, the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT), agencies, the International Renewable Energy Agency or policy networks, and the Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiency Partnership. The course introduces students to the global dimensions of energy policy, discusses shifting agendas, and assesses the institutional spectrum of global energy governance. Offered online at least once every two years.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    450.781.81 - The Global Cold War

    Jason Ridler

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    The Cold War was anything but for much of the so-called Third World. Although the United States and Soviet Union did not come to blows, millions of lives were lost throughout Latin America, Africa, and Asia as the superpower struggle fueled local and transnational conflicts over decolonization and modernization. This course will examine the Cold War’s effects across the globe and, conversely, the ways in which conflicts and actors in the global South shaped the outcome of the US-Soviet standoff and shaped the contemporary geopolitical landscape. Sources will include works of scholarship such as Conflicting Missions, Hanoi’s War, and The Last Colonial Massacre; primary works like Discourse on Colonialism and essays from Jawharlal Nehru, Fidel Castro, and Ché Guevara; and films such as The Battle of Chile and The Act of Killing.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    475.605.81 - Program Development and Evaluation

    Jeffrey Kantor

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/27 - 8/18

    From the perspective of funders, this course explores ways in which initiatives become sponsored programs, the role of strategic planning, how proposals are designed and disseminated, how responses are solicited and evaluated. The important role that communication plays is emphasized, and communication strategies and work products are examined. The course also allows students to become familiar with key roles and relationships, such as those played by the program officer, the proposal development specialist, and the principle investigator.

    Technology Fee: $200.00