Course Schedule

For Fall 2019, the following Geographic Information Systems courses count toward your program. Please take note of the prerequisites for these courses as well as the technology requirements. Most of the GIS software runs on Windows. If you’re using a Mac, your computer must be able to simulate Windows. More information can be found here.

Please note that the MS in Government Analytics is an interdisciplinary program. If there is a course offered through Johns Hopkins that you would like to apply to your program but is not listed below, contact Dr. Bachner to determine if the course is indeed appropriate and to secure approval.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Government Analytics courses.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies


    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/9 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    Marco Zambotti

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/12

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.607.51 - Counterintelligence and National Security: 21st Century Challenges

    William Nolte

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    Counterintelligence information regarding and operations against foreign intelligence services has always been central to the intelligence process. In many places and at various times, it has been clearly the most significant part of that process. For reasons that will be discussed during the semester, this has not been true in American intelligence for the last half century or so. This class will examine the doctrine and processes of counterintelligence through the 20th century, with the second half of the class pivoting to address the challenges posed by a volatile information and communications environment, a geopolitical environment in which non-states operate as both potential threats and potential partners, and in which insider threats may be as great as those emanating from foreign actors. Finally, the course will address the challenges of operating effective counterintelligence operations in a manner that respects democratic processes and values.

    470.608.51 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    This is core course for the MA in Public Management.

    470.632.51 - Security Issues in South Asia

    Syed Ali

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:30; 9/10 - 12/17

    The South Asian region, with its complex historical context, a large and diverse population, and contested national borders, especially between nuclearized countries, poses some of the toughest security challenges facing the world. This course highlights salient security challenges in South Asia, and draws out their implications for U.S. strategic interests. It examines the sources and implications of the rivalry between nuclearized India and Pakistan, and how it fuels Sino-Indian security competition. Attention is drawn to the sources of militancy in India, and to the threats to international and regional security arising from the conflict in Afghanistan. The Sri Lankan Tamil Tiger insurgency and its eventual defeat in 2009 are also discussed, alongside the rising Islamist militancy threats in Bangladeshi, and the history of Maoist insurgency in Nepal. Finally, some of the climate-based threats to which no South Asian country is immune will also be discussed.

    470.636.51 - Cognitive and Behavioral Foundations for Artificial Intelligence

    Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/9 - 12/16

    Artificial intelligence is rapidly improving for well-defined tasks and narrow intelligence. But will AI ever have human-like general intelligence? This course is designed to answer this complex question by giving students a working knowledge of the underlying principles and mechanisms of human behavior and cognition. Key topics to be addressed include vision, audition, language, emotion, memory, creativity, and consciousness. We will use current and future advancements in big data and AI as a backdrop for critical and creative analysis.

    470.657.51 - Energy, Security, and Defense

    Oliver Fritz

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:30; 9/5 - 12/12

    This course is a seminar-based overview of the role of energy in national security. Using a range of U.S. and non-U.S. case studies, students will review the roles of energy in grand strategy, the role of energy in conflict, and, finally, as a logistical enabler of military operations.

    470.660.51 - Program Evaluation

    John Milatzo

    Tuesday 6:30 - 9:15; 9/10 - 12/17

    Program Evaluation is the systematic use of empirical information to assess and improve the efficacy of public or non-profit programs and policies. Evaluation is increasingly required by funders and policy makers concerned with accountability and efficient use of public or philanthropic resources. In addition, many governments and organizations have built the logic of evaluation into their work through systems of performance management and monitoring.

    This course introduces the student to the literature, theories and approaches to evaluating organizational programs, policies and procedures. Students will acquire a broad perspective on types of program evaluation, including formative and summative evaluation, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Students gain practical experience through exercises and assignments involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, analysis of quantitative and qualitative evaluation data, and development of an evaluation plan to measure impact. In addition, topics such as experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental study designs are introduced in the context of a variety of settings, including schools, welfare agencies, mental health organizations, criminal justice settings, environmental programs, nonprofit organizations, and corporations.

    Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    This course may count as a core course for the M.S. in Government Analytics.

    Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.662.51 - Assessing Foreign Militaries

    Robert Levine

    Thursday 6:15 - 9:00; 9/5 - 12/12

    "A key function of national security analysis is to dissect and explain foreign militaries—to lay bare for senior authorities the perceptions, intentions, and capabilities of potential opponents and allies. This course prepares participants to perform such assessments. It explores what senior decision makers need to know, potential sources of information and the most important questions to ask of analysts, and the analytic tools to parse and understand a complex and partially hidden world. It uses a variety of materials including in-depth case studies, exercises, and discussions to develop the necessary knowledge and skills. The course addresses topics such as the operational level of war, manpower, training, morale, and readiness, technology, weapons assimilation, logistics, the prediction of outcomes. It also discusses how these considerations apply to cyber war.

    470.670.51 - The Practice & Politics of U.S. Tax Policy

    James Carter

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/9 - 12/16

    Benjamin Franklin famously observed that “nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” Since Franklin’s day, however, both the form and prevalence of taxation have undergone a dramatic global transformation. This course will review the history of U.S. federal taxation and delve into the practical mechanics of taxation. It will provide students with an understanding of the processes, institutions, and political influences that shape tax policy. Finally, it will examine alternative methods of taxation and consider what the future may hold for federal tax policy. (Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    Kevin Woods

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/9 - 12/16

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    470.696.51 - Ethics and Privacy in Intelligence Operations

    Ronald Marks

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    This course will address the ethical dilemmas and privacy issues that challenge intelligence and government decision makers in an increasingly complex operational and technological environment. We will examine basic moral, ethical and privacy considerations from all sides at several key points in intelligence operations from collection to covert action. The course will analyze the evolving nature of privacy concerns worldwide, with an emphasis on the balance between individual rights and national security needs as executed by intelligence agencies. Students will examine the policy implications inherent in seeking to address these issues. The readings will include diverse and opposing viewpoints as well as practicums and simulations to allow debate of the key positions in "real world" situations. Prior enrollment in 406.665 "The Art and Practice of Intelligence" or 470.711 "Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy" is strongly encouraged.

    470.697.51 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    John Sano

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    470.724.51 - Managing Dangerous Futures: Global Political Risk Analysis

    Seth Kaplan

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/12

    Political risk affects almost every major decision that governments, corporations, nonprofit organizations, and even individuals make, sometimes turning what appears to be a good decision into a bad one, with severe implications. However, few people really understand political risk or how it can be evaluated and mitigated. The goals of this course are to ensure that all students can assess the political risk of a particular country or situation; assess the political risk of a particular business investment; take a much broader perspective on the possible sources of political risk; understand how the way people think and groups function preclude effective decision making (thus making bad decisions more common); evaluate risks using a variety of different risk assessment tools; and leverage a variety of mechanisms to improve risk management.

    470.765.51 - Government Regulation of Business: Price and Entry Controls

    Hayden Bryan

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    There are two main approaches for implementing government domestic policy: fiscal and regulatory. This is a one-semester course in economic regulation. Economic regulation includes use of market entry and price controls to deal with market imperfections, such as natural monopolies in which competitive markets fail. The course would cover: · the nature of markets and market failure, · a political economy/public choice analysis of the genesis of government intervention, · an evaluation of corrective policies, and · an analysis of alternative regulatory strategies. In addition to the regulation of natural monopolies, potentially competitive markets, and the problem of regulatory capture, the course would cover alternative types of environmental regulation for controlling external social costs. The class would prepare the successful student to examine and interpret problems, policies, programs, and events at all levels of government using the powerful tools of economic analysis applied to government regulation. ?

    This is a new course offering that counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.775.51 - Warfare in Peactime

    James Van De Velde

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    “Warfare” today is often ambiguous, constant, and non-violent: a combination of low intensity conflict and struggles over information via cyberspace, especially over “narratives” that sway public opinion. Warfare has always included these elements, but our adversaries today fight and stay in this early stage of cyberspace operations, information operations, and limited or no kinetic conflict, careful never to escalate to state-on-state violence. This course will examine how “non-kinetic” warfare (information operations, cyberspace operations, non-violent resistance) takes place today. Students will learn how the control and manipulation of information shapes national security and creates new political realities. Focus will be on Russian hybrid warfare and “information confrontation,” Chinese weaponization of business and cyberspace and “coercive gradualism,” and terrorist’s use of the internet.

    470.794.51 - Fixing American Politics

    Lee Drutman

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/10 - 12/17

    The widespread diagnosis of American politics is that it is “broken.” But what is wrong with American politics? And what, if anything, can be done to fix it? This course will examine the current problems in American politics from a historical, theoretical, and comparative perspective, and explore possible reforms that might make American politics function better.

    This is a new course offering that counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.796.51 - 2020 Presidential Campaign: Pre-Primary Phase: Campaigning, Communicating & Controversy

    Robert Guttman

    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/9 - 12/16

    The fall before the Iowa Caucus and New Hampshire primary is a key time for the candidates to put their presidential campaigns into high gear. The Democrat debate series will continue into the fall and we will look at the communications strategies of the candidates for the debates as well as analyze and discuss President Trump's media and political strategy for re-election, especially how he rallies his base.The class will delve into the threat of impeachment and other congressional investigations and any impact they will have on the road to the White House. We will analyze the social media strategies of all the presidential contenders (and Trump's Tweets as well) and look at how the mainstream media is covering the race. The class will look at fundraising, policy statements, speeches and the role of personality and character in the 2020 presidential campaign and compare to other presidential elections in American history. We hope to have several of the 2020 presidential candidates speak at Hopkins in the fall.

    This is a new course that counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.800.51 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    This is an onsite class that can also accommodate offsite students via Zoom meeting. If you are available to take this class on Tuesdays at 6:00 pm EST, you may sign up for this class, even if you are not in the DC area. You will fully partake of the class via Zoom, appearing on a large screen in the classroom and able to see everyone in the class and participate in class discussion and class presentations.

    470.851.51 - Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    William Marcellino

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    Gregory Cox

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management. This course meets one of the required courses for the Global Securities Studies program.

    470.855.51 - Research Study Seminar

    Mark Stout

    Monday 5:45 - 8:30; 9/9 - 12/16

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.860.51 - Capstone for Public Management

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 8:30 - 10:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This is the final required course in the MA in Public Management program, and students can only take the capstone course in their final semester and after having completed all the other core requirements (Students graduating in the summer semester must take the course in the preceding spring semester). In the semester prior to taking the capstone course and conducting the project, students identify a project topic. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course. To complete the course, students must write a 30- to 35-page capstone paper.

    This is the final required course for the MA in Public Management. Both onsite and online students should sign up for this course. Only Public Management students may take this course.

  • Online Courses

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    470.602.82 - Government & Politics

    Douglas Harris

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    John Gans

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.611.81 - Introduction to Terrorism Studies

    Elena Mastors

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course provide an overview of the principal areas important to the study of terrorism. The course offers a variety of academic, policy, and operational models, theories, approaches, and concepts regarding the definitions of terrorism, the nature and functioning of various terrorist groups across the globe, and a variety of domestic and international governmental operational and policy responses. Through this exploration, students will be able to identify patterns of behavior of both terrorist groups and governmental responses, and will also be able to identify gaps, and principal areas of improvements in how we understand, and respond to this important security challenge.

    470.617.81 - The Courts and Public Policy

    Kevin Scott

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Americans traditionally have viewed the courts as—in the words of a constitutional scholar—"the least dangerous branch of government." They are seen as reflectors, not agents, of change. But in an age of government downsizing, the role of the courts bears renewed examination. Students explore the historical and philosophical roots for the notion that American courts, and whether the lawyers who appear before them, can and should make law and policy, and the alternatives to this function. Students consider prominent areas of public policy that have been shaped by the courts, such as civil rights, family and domestic law, environmental and safety regulation, and the regulation of business and commerce. This course counts towards the Legal Studies Concentration.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.620.81 - Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community

    David Murray

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course provides students with an overview of intelligence structures within the Five Eyes community (US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). It covers both foreign and domestic agencies, be they civilian, military or police; HUMINT or SIGINT- enabled; security-intelligence or foreign-intelligence oriented; and tactically or strategically-focused. The course will compare how the various Five Eyes security or intelligence services set priorities and objectives, define national interests (versus shared requirements), develop tactical intelligence, create actionable insights, and how they craft timely and relevant assessments for both domestic and foreign partners. Students are expected to be able to draw conclusions on the value of different types of intelligence, from tactical operations intended to mitigate threat to life cases, to strategic insights relating to proliferation or espionage cases. Upon completing the course, students will understand the dynamics that exist amongst operators and analysts, as well as partners within and outside of the alliance, between domestic intelligence clients and foreign agencies, in regards to sensitive national interests and those of the international partnership.

    470.627.81 - Financial Management & Analysis in the Public Sector

    Thanh Nguyen

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course focuses on financial aspects of public sector organizations and institutions. The objectives of this course include helping students (1) learn the basics of public sector accounting and the construction of their financial reports, (2) become more intelligent users of the financial statements of public sector organizations such as sovereign, state, and municipal institutions, and (3) better understand the factors that affect the financial condition and financial performance of such entities.

    More specifically, the course focuses on (1) the financial reporting concepts and standards that are applicable to public sector organizations; (2) ratios and other summary indicators used by analysts to evaluate the financial condition and financial performance of public sector and nonprofit organizations; (3) the analysis and interpretation of financial statements of selected public sector organizations; (4) fundamental finance principles; and 5) basic principles of budget formulation.

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.634.81 - Open Source Research in Conflict, Politics and Scholarship

    Michael Smith

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course examines the open source research discipline (often called open source intelligence or OSINT), and is primarily concerned with how open source research helps a diverse mix of actors achieve their goals. It is designed to help students develop open source research skills that can have broad utility in their academic and professional careers while considering such topics as how these skills empower governments and a range of nongovernmental actors, including private companies, international aid agencies, and even terrorist groups. In addition to gaining experience applying tools and techniques utilized by OSINT professionals to perform independent research and participate in collaborative exercises, students will become familiar with ethical and legal issues which influence the design of open source research in academic settings.

    470.640.81 - Challenges of Transnational Security

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course focuses on transnational security issues and considers how many of these myriad challenges constitute threats to global peace and security. The combined effects of issues such as drug, weapons, and human trafficking, piracy, terrorism, infectious diseases, and deliberate environmental destruction, along with such critical enablers as corruption, and money movements, are not strangers on the world stage. What is new is their global reach and destructive potential. As a result, these issues have made policy makers consider different conceptions of security and, at times, to move beyond sole considerations of state sovereignty into the realm of human security. Not only are transnational security issues varied in nature and scope, but their effects often are obscured by the fact that many are nascent with gradual and long-term consequences. Further, while some transnational issues may not constitute direct threats to global security, they may threaten the world economy, and quality of life of its citizens. Still others compound and reinforce each other, generating mutations of the original threats. This course will examine a small number of these transnational security issues and relevant policy-making efforts.

    470.643.81 - Text as Data

    Janis Butkevics

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Text is not straightforward. In this course, students will develop the tools necessary to collect, analyze, and visualize large amounts of text. The course begins with a hands-on introduction to the programming concepts necessary to collect and process textual data, then proceeds to the key statistical concepts in machine learning and statistics used to analyze text as data. Throughout the course, students develop a research project that culminates in the online display of results from a large-scale textual analysis. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology fee: $200.00

    470.644.81 - Democracy and Its Modern Critics

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Much of international politics in the last century can be described as a conflict between liberal democracy and its modern critics. During this period the values and political structures of liberal democracy have been extended to more parts of the world than ever before. Yet the same era also saw the emergence of powerful challengers to liberal democracy from both the right and the left. The resulting clash of ideologies defined such conflicts as World War II and the Cold War. In this course we will survey the intellectual roots of Fascism, National Socialism, and Communism. We will also examine the question of Islam and democracy looking at both its proponents and its radical critics in the Islamic world. Among those whose writings we will examine are Karl Marx, V.I. Lenin, Benito Mussolini, Carl Schmitt, Charles Maurras, Syed Qutb, Ali Shariati, Muktedar Khan, and Ruhollah Khomeini. This course counts towards the Security Studies concentration.

    470.656.81 - Presidential Power and Politics

    Michael Siegel

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course considers the evolution of the presidency from its creation by the founders who had “their fingers crossed” while contemplating an executive agent for the emerging government, to its contemporary massive presence in our political system. The class also examines the interactions of the president with the other branches of government—Congress and the Courts—as well as the dynamics and management challenges presented within the executive branch itself. The course focuses on the leadership attributes of effective presidents, as well as aspects of personality or “character” that influence presidential performance. Finally the class focuses on the power and influence exerted by the presidency in domestic public policy and in foreign affairs. Students will be encouraged to develop their own ideas of what makes a great president ion the 21st century.

    This course counts for the Concentration in Political Communication

    470.666.81 - Institutional Fundraising: Raising Maximum Dollars from Government Agencies, Corporations and Foundations

    Karen Osborne

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    In this hands-on course, we’ll help you understand the fundamentals of securing funds from institutional donors. As a staff or board leader of a non-profit, understanding the ins and outs of raising funds for priority projects and capacity building from government agencies, corporations and foundations will add to your toolkit for moving your organization forward. We’ll cover how this aspect of fundraising fits into your overall fundraising strategy and plan. We’ll help you identify the right potential funders for important projects, learn how to land capacity-building funds you can use to grow and sustain your organization, cover the basics of relationship-building with institutional decision-makers, help you use data to build credibility with funders, create pitch-perfect corporate presentations and dive into the process of writing winning proposals and applications. Finally, we’ll cover fulfillment and stewardship. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.673.81 - Data Visualization


    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course instructs students in various visualization techniques and software. Students will learn how to: (1) ask interesting questions about politics, (2) identify data that can be used to answer those questions, (3) collect, clean and document the data, (4) explore and analyze the data with statistical and graphical techniques, (5) create compelling, informative and accurate visualizations and (6) present these visualizations to educated audiences. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    470.685.81 - The Challenge of Change: Innovation in Military Affairs

    Jason Ridler

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Change is perennial in national security and military affairs, but knowing how, why, and when to embrace change is both difficult and vital. Strategies and tactics may be outdated, new ideas may be resisted, and science and technology continue to change our world faster than we can optimize. The paradox deepens with context: innovation in peacetime has one logic while innovation in war has another. This course unravels the nature of change in military affairs through four themes: ideas, materials, human capital and structure, and, appreciation of the enemy. The course explores these themes through a series of case studies from around the world. Topics include civilian development/military application of science and technology; learning from failure and success (including from other nations); institutional reactions to change; procurement and the role of industry; and, the impact and limitations of individual “champions” of change.

    470.688.81 - Political Institutions and the Policy Process

    Douglas Harris

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Bridging the divide between political science theories of policymaking and the actual workings of the policy process in the institutions of national government, this course examines the individual contributions of each of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as well as the interactions and struggles between those branches. How do these various institutions set the policy agenda, develop and deliberate policy alternatives, make authoritative policy decisions, and implement those decisions? In what ways are the interactions between these institutions best considered conflict or cooperation? Also, how do outside actors and institutions -- the media, interest groups, public opinion, parties and campaigns -- affect policymaking in these various institutional settings? Drawing on the Constitutional design and historical development of these institutions as well as contemporary practice, this course examines the purposes, processes, and outcomes of policymaking from an institutional perspective.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance ?

    470.689.81 - NGOs in Development and Global Policy-Making

    Laura Roper

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Formerly Overview of Global Public and Nonprofit Relationship). This course provides an overview of the role of both national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in processes of development, humanitarian response, and the promotion of human rights and active citizenship. The last decade has been one of rapid change in which NGO relationships with government, the private sector, and donors has been in a state of flux, with unprecedented challenges raised about the legitimacy and effectiveness of NGO actors. The course will look at how systemic changes the evolution of transnational advocacy, the aid effectiveness process, the emergence of new development actors from countries (such as India, China and Brazil) to the primacy of the private sector has influenced NGOs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    Mark Stout

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    470.693.81 - Comparative Democracies

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course uses the comparative method to look at the varieties of democracies that exist today. In the course, we will ask what is democracy, how do we measure it, and how does it vary across space and time? We will look at how democracy manifests in different constitutional forms e.g. parliamentary versus presidential. We will examine how different electoral and party systems influence variation in outcome within the set of democracies, and how social cleavages interact with, and are molded by, these systems. Further, we will use the answers to these questions to explore the issue of democratic consolidation and to ask why some countries become and stay democratic, while others do not. Case studies will be drawn from Europe, Latin America and Asia.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.695.81 - Proseminar: Essentials of Public and Private Management

    Jeremy Kirkland

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (The purpose of the class is to help equip students to operate effectively in both the public and private sectors. The class will cover three major topics: (1) an overview of managing public and private organizations, with special attention to their differing missions, capabilities, and environments; (2) a survey of important relationships between the public and private sectors; and (3) the need for improved coordination between the public and private sectors to achieve important public purposes. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge in the context of the issues discussed. Students will be expected to complete a significant paper on a relevant topic approved by the instructor. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA program)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.699.81 - Applied Performance Analytics

    Carter Hewgley

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Data are everywhere, and many elected officials and government managers understand they need it. But how can they use data to solve problems and shape policy? What is the best way to make decisions based on a data analysis? How do you communicate those decisions, and the rationale behind them, to employees, citizens and stakeholders? This course provides students with an experiential learning opportunity based on a real-world scenario. Students begin by studying foundational concepts and techniques of data collection, analytics, and decision support. They also learn how to navigate multiple interests, asymmetrical information, and competing political agendas as they make difficult decisions about resource allocation and public policy. Along the way, they learn how to turn insights into action by effectively communicating the results of analysis to busy executives and decision makers at all levels of the organization. Their work culminates in a showcase event where the class presents their recommended solutions to government practitioners, who review and critique their proposal.

    Recommended prerequisite: Statistics and Political Analysis. Students will be required to use Excel in the course; the instructor strongly recommends that students have a working knowledge of Excel. Students should be able to execute all of the following functions in Excel: sorting, filtering, pivoting, and making a chart.

    470.701.81 - Congress: Why the First Branch Matters

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Congress is the First Branch, “the People’s Branch,” and one of the most powerful legislatures the world has ever known. At this moment in history, however, the people do not assess the institution favorably and political scientists and pundits have declared it the “broken branch.” Is Congress “broken” or merely reflective of our political times? In an era of “unorthodox lawmaking” is a return to “regular order” and “textbook lawmaking” realistic or a fantasy? This course will discuss these questions in the context of the evolving nature of Congress as an institution. The class will examine the institutional development of Congress and explore changes in its representative and legislative functions, as well as constitutional responsibility of holding the “power of the purse.” Congress remains a dynamic institution and it behooves citizens to understand its complexity and centrality to governance in the U.S.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.713.81 - Resisting Tyranny: Strategic Nonviolent Conflict

    Maciej Bartkowski

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    War practitioners, policy makers, and security studies scholars study asymmetric warfare to understand why poorly armed insurgents effectively resist and even defeat technologically advanced and materially stronger armies. This course studies a perfect asymmetry in nonviolent warfare where unarmed ordinary people are able to effectively challenge and eventually defeat a fully armed, resource-rich regimes. In fact, historically, nonviolent movements have been twice as effective against violent regimes as armed insurgencies. This course will consider skills of organized populations in inter-state and intra-state conflicts, including anti-dictatorship, anti-occupation, anti-corruption, anti-violence struggles and analyze how disciplined civilians use nonviolent strategies and tactics to galvanize large and diverse participation, place their violent opponents in dilemma, make repression backfire and cause defections among adversaries' pillars of support.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.719.81 - Technical Collection of Intelligence

    Robert Clark

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course covers the application of remote sensing technology to intelligence issues to include geospatial intelligence (GEOINT), measurements and signatures intelligence (MASINT) and signals intelligence (SIGINT). It examines the tradeoffs associated with the use of different imaging, radar, and passive radiofrequency sensors and collection platforms. The methods for processing, exploiting and analyzing raw intelligence data collected by different types of sensors are discussed. The final segment of the course investigates the management issues associated with remote sensing in intelligence.

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    Karin Orr

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.731.81 - Privacy in a Data-driven Society

    Rhea Siers

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course will address the legal, policy and cultural issues that challenge the government and its citizens in the increasingly complex technical environment of privacy. We will examine the challenges in balancing the need for information and data against the evolving landscape of individual privacy rights. The course will examine privacy at all levels: by analyzing the shifting views of individual privacy by citizens as well as the technological challenges in both protecting and analyzing personal information for government use. Using case studies and hypotheticals, we will discuss the issue of transparency in the government use and retention of data. Our cases will range from healthcare.gov to “sunshine laws” to national security uses of information. We will trace the development of legal and policy measures relevant to privacy concerns and envision future solutions needed in an era of great technological innovation including the use of “big data”.

    470.734.81 - Organizational Leadership and Ethics in NGO Management

    Linda Kiltz

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course focuses on organizational leadership strategies and the role of ethics within nonprofit and nongovernmental work specifically. A wide scope of ethical issues relevant to nonprofit and nongovernmental work will be reviewed, analyzed and discussed. NPOs/NGOs operate under specific ethical guidelines in order to ensure accountability to the public and their many stakeholders. This course will focus on ethical behavior within organizations and explore instances of when prominent NGO leaders and organizations have been situated to face ethical dilemmas. The course will cover a wide scope of management models, techniques, and organizational values and goals. It will also review the impact that various leadership styles have had on organizations through the study of case studies and what has amounted to optimal leadership effectiveness. Students will acquire the skills necessary to build and lead effective and high performance nongovernmental organizations. Students will also explore the role of culture within varying leadership styles. Objectives of the course are for students to learn the techniques needed when establishing values and ethics within an organizational culture and a review on the establishment of ethical climates in their organizations and communities. In addition to learning strategies to lead high performance organizations ethically.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.741.81 - Campaigns and Elections

    Richard Skinner

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course introduces current theories and controversies concerning political campaigns and elections in the United States. We take advantage of the fact that the class meets during the "invisible primary" of the 2016 presidential campaign, and students are expected to follow journalistic accounts closely. The course is split into two major parts. First, we consider the style and structure of American campaigns. For example, we ask how campaigns have changed in the last fifty years, especially concerning the role of parties, the presence of incumbency advantage, and the role of money. In addition, we consider why candidates decide to run, how they position themselves on important issues, and how they design their campaign messages. We also cover the importance of campaign polling, and the tricky task of forecasting election outcomes. Second, we explore the impact of campaigns on voters. For example, we ask whether campaigns ever convince voters to change their opinion, or whether demographic and socioeconomic factors explain most political behavior. The goal of the course is to review the importance of elections in American politics, and to provide the tools to make normative judgments about the health of American democracy.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.743.81 - Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

    Nicole Alioto

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Many government agencies engage in data mining to detect unforeseen patterns and advanced analytics, such as classification techniques, to predict future outcomes. In this course, students will utilize IBM SPSS Modeler to investigate patterns and derive predictions in areas such as fraud, healthcare, fundraising, human resources and others. In addition, students will learn to build segmentation models using clustering techniques in an applied manner. Integration with other statistical tools and visualization options will be discussed. Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.745.81 - Terrorist Financing Analysis and Counterterrorist Finance Techniques

    Jason Blazakis

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    The course examines how terrorist groups finance their operations. It also explores current policy approaches to curb financial support to terrorists through the application of U.S. and international sanctions, in particular how multilateral fora, such as the United Nations and the Financial Action Task Force, disrupt and deter terrorist financing. At the completion of this course, students will have a better understanding of the key tools, including law enforcement, diplomacy, and intelligence, that are used to counter terrorists’ financial networks and activities. Through this course, students will develop proficiency in a series of analytic methods used to study terrorist financing and counter financing. Students will use structured analytic tools such as weighted ranking methods, scenario trees, causal flow diagramming, hypothesis testing, and utility analysis, as well as game theory and logic to form analytic judgments. Prior coursework or professional experience in intelligence, (counter) terrorism, or finance recommended.

    470.746.81 - Iran: Security Policy of a Revolutionary State

    Bryan Gibson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course will provide the analytical and contextual skills required to understand the current political and security situation of Iran. After laying out the context of the Iranian Revolution through a brief examination of the Pahlavi years, the course then weaves together Iran’s political, military, diplomatic, social, economic development during the turbulent years between Iran’s 1978-1979 revolution and the 2015 nuclear agreement—covering a time period of roughly 1941 to the present day. This course covers three main inter-related topics: the history and development of the modern Iranian state; the interaction between state and society in modern Iran; and Iran’s diplomatic history in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course concludes with a discussion of Iran’s present-day foreign, security, and defense structures and processes.

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    Gary Keeley

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course introduces students to the field of intelligence, particularly as practiced in the United States. After a brief overview of the historical foundations of modern intelligence, it discusses how intelligence was conducted during the 20th century including collection, analysis, counterintelligence, covert action, and oversight. It then discusses the disruptive influences of September 11, the Iraq War, and new technologies. The course concludes with a discussion of the “democratization of intelligence."

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.758.81 - Data-Driven Campaigns and Elections

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course examines the ways in which campaigns increasingly rely on data and analytics to inform their voter mobilization and persuasion strategies. Campaigns are leveraging massive databases that contain information on voters’ spending, political engagement and media-consumption habits. Using this information, campaigns make decisions about which television/print ad slots to purchase and which voters to target in get-out-the-vote efforts.

    470.763.81 - Database Management Systems

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course provides students with a strong foundation in database architecture and database management systems. The principles and methodologies of database design, and techniques for database application development are evaluated. The current trends in modern database technologies such as Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), NoSQL Databases Cloud Databases, and Graph Databases are examined.

    470.769.81 - Data Science for Public Policy

    Holly Brasher

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.770.81 - Communicating Public Policy

    Marilyn Serafini

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.773.81 - Energy and Environmental Security

    Chad Briggs

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.784.81 - Technology of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Charles Blair

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Students gain the foundational knowledge behind WMD (both weapons of mass destruction and weapons of mass disruption) and about how these weapons threaten U.S. homeland security. Weapons of mass destruction traditionally include nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, while weapons of mass disruption include radiological weapons, such as "dirty bombs." In addition, the course covers the technology behind three WMD delivery vehicles: ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. In assessing each WMD threat, the course first examines the science and technology for each type of weapon and then applies this theory to real world threats emanating from state and non-state actors. Students apply this knowledge by engaging in red team exercises to identify options for preventing and reducing vulnerabilities from WMD. Please note that students do not have to have prior technical knowledge about WMD issues to succeed in this course.

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    Leana Bowman

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    Adam Wolfson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government


    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    470.854.81 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.855.81 - Research Study Seminar

    Sarah Clark

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.861.81 - Capstone Continuation

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    Holly Brasher

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    This course is only for students who are completing their capstone projects for the MS in Government Analytics program.

    This course is only for students pursuing the MS in Government Analytics. It should be taken in your last (or next-to-last) term.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    470.902.81 - Sports Impact Leadership Certificate

    Alisha Greenberg
    Meredith Wolff

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Andree DuVarney
    Rhey Solomon

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.646.81 - Transportation Policy and Smart Growth

    Christopher Van Wyk

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    This course examines how transportation policy and decisions can alleviate or prevent problems resulting from urban sprawl. How can transportation decisions and planning contribute to more livable urban design and land use patterns that promote smart growth that is environmentally and ecologically sustainable? Students discuss how different environmental media land, water, and air are affected by our transportation systems and resulting development patterns, and how the design of transportation systems the highways, roads, transit systems, and bike and walk paths can more closely harmonize with nature and provide communities with a better quality of life. A wide range of policy options is examined, from altering the structure of road pricing to redesigning neighborhoods and altering urban form. A number of case studies are examined to illuminate the issues and principles raised in the course. Offered online at least every other year. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    420.665.81 - Climate Change on the Front Lines: The Study of Adaptation in Developing Countries

    Amir Poudel

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    Poor and developing countries are predicted to bear the brunt of climate change. This course will focus on key sectors such as agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, water resources, human health, and tourism and the ways in which poorer and developing counties are impacted by and adapting to climate change. This course may focus on a region or a specific country depending on the instructor. Assessment and evaluation of demographic trends, environmental challenges such as retreating ice, potential flood hazards, ecosystem impacts, as well as health issues will be incorporated. International instruments such as adaptation funds, carbon funds, clean development mechanisms, and reduced deforestation/degradation strategies and policies will be investigated in a comparative analysis of impacts and adaptation responses of countries around the world. Offered online, annually.

    425.601.81 - Principles and Applications of Energy Technology

    Peter Saundry

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    The course examines energy supply and consumption, and how these activities impact the environment, with a focus on understanding the potential technology, market structure and policy implications for climate change. Students will gain a solid understanding of the science, economics, environmental impact associated with various electricity generation technologies, including renewable energy, conventional generation (existing and future), carbon storage and sequestration, and electricity storage. Transportation topics will address a variety of technologies, including hybrids and fuels cells, as well as the potential role for alternative fuels, including biofuels. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    $200 technology online fee.

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    425.605.51 - Introduction to Energy Law & Policy

    Kenneth Hurwitz

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/11

    This course will provide an overview of the major laws and policies that shape and regulate the complex energy system the United States and, to a lesser degree, the world. The goal is to provide students with a framework for understanding the energy laws and policies of today and those likely to be important in coming years. The course will review laws and policies for all major types of energy, including fossil fuels, nuclear, and renewables, as well as issues related to extraction, conversion, distribution, use, and conservation. Laws and policies ranging from local level to state, federal, and international levels will be included. Laws and policies will be presented again in the context of profound and rate changes occurring in the energy system, climate change and other environmental issues, economics, national security, and population growth. The course will be largely empirical, but attention will be given to major theories. Most aspects of the course will be illustrated by reference to contemporary issues, such as the recently unveiled Clean Power Plan, court decisions, climate change negotiations, and changes in state policies and federal tax policies for renewables. Offered on-site at least once every two years.