Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Online Courses

    472.600.81 - Introduction to Geospatial Intelligence

    John O'Connor

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course provides an overview of the four disciplines that have merged to create the new discipline of geospatial intelligence and an introduction to the content of the program. The history of imagery analysis and digital cartography, the art of turning observation into insight and communicating those insights to non-experts, the science behind the sensors and platforms, and the mathematics behind imagery collection sampling strategies. The course studies the issues, technologies, and changes over the past 60 years that have developed into geospatial intelligence, and it will introduce the students to the opportunities and challenges of geospatial intelligence as it has shaped intelligence collection, analysis, reporting, and policy decisions. The outcomes of success in this profession have created new industries, and the course will also review the effects of commercial imagery, smallsats, non-governmental collection, and remotely piloted sensors. Students will be introduced to the concepts that will be covered through the remainder of the Master’s program through the Capstone exercise.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    472.610.81 - Collection Modelling and Management for Commercial Imagery

    James Vrabel

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course will begin with a brief history of commercial imagery. From there students will learn the fundamentals of various imaging sensor modalities (spectral, thermal, radar, motion imagery, etc.). Next, a historical perspective of collection management will be presented followed by changes to collection management due to technology advances within the commercial imaging industry. The strengths and weaknesses of collection models will be described, and students will learn to apply mathematically defined judgements to assess the value and cost of competitive imagery purchases. These judgments will examine the questions that drive the imagery purchase; the respective kinds of sensors and their applicability to certain questions, and the respective kinds of platforms for these sensors--aircraft, remotely piloted vehicles (drones), and different kinds of satellites, including smallsats (small satellites). The intended outcome would be the students understanding of the fundamentals of commercial imaging satellites and their collection criteria, through the comprehension of existing collection plans; the evaluation of existing collection plans; and the creation and budgeting for new collection plans.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    472.611.81 - Analyzing Social Media and Geospatial Information

    Veli-Pekka Kivimaki

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    Social media is now present globally in everyday life, and in conflicts. With its reach, social media has also become an increasingly meaningful information source for scholars, advocacy groups, intelligence agencies, and others who are interested in shaping public discourse. This course introduces students to social media as part of present day open source information gathering, and how to plan collection and conduct analysis of information from social media. The course covers the operations security considerations, monitoring real time events, verification of online material, basics of social network analysis, and how to work with imagery sourced from social media, including geolocation of imagery. Automation and the limits of it in different phases of the process, and future developments in social media exploitation will also be discussed. During the course, students will conduct a hands-on investigation using social media data.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    472.612.81 - Geospatial Analysis: Communicating with Multiple Audiences

    Renny Babiarz

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    The course will cover the art of communicating geospatial intelligence in writing, photographs or images, and mapping. It will address the challenges of communicating technical information and intelligence from satellites, aircraft, and drones, into text, combinations of text, graphics, maps, and data base,. The students will perform their own analysis, and convert their intelligence discoveries into data bases, reporting, analysis, briefings, and video-based presentations.

    Technology fee: $200.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    430.604.81 - Spatial Analytics

    Gergana Miller

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    This course introduces students to using various techniques for solving spatial problems. The course teaches a proven process one can utilize to address common inquiries related to understanding spatial relationships and patterns. Traditional analytical methods such as suitability analysis, network analysis, geostatistical analysis, spatial interpolation, etc. are examined, along with recent data science and analytics methodologies that help us extract knowledge and insights from data. Examples and assignments are drawn from many applications, such as business, urban planning, public safety, public health, transportation and natural sciences. Offered twice a year. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    430.609.81 - Spatial Data Management: Quality and Control

    Paulus Zandbergen

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    Spatial data quality is a major concern for any GIS. This course examines the nature of errors in spatial data and various aspects of spatial data quality, including positional and thematic accuracy, resolution, precision, completeness and logical consistency. The impacts of errors on the reliability of GIS-based analysis are explored. Various strategies to improve the quality of spatial data are addressed, including the use of standards for spatial data (FGDC, OGC and ISO) and data management tools. Offered once a year. Prerequisite: 430.601 Geographic Information Systems,

    Technology fee: $200.00

    430.613.81 - Advanced Topics in Remote Sensing

    Michelle Kinzel-Porter

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    This course explores the various remote sensing platforms, collection systems, processing methods, and classification approaches to remotely sensed data. Course content includes the Electromagnetic Spectrum, Lidar, Interferometric SAR, Sonar, Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (drone technology), 2D vs. 3D modeling, volumetric analysis, ecological research with remote sensing and applications of technology and datasets in GIS models. Offered once a year. Prerequisite: 430.602 Remote Sensing: Systems and Applications.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    430.619.81 - Web Application Development

    Janelle Versnick

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    This course is designed to provide students with experience in web programming and application development. It focuses on uses of Web APIs for developing rich and interactive web mapping applications. HTML, CSS and several popular JavaScript frameworks, such as Dojo, JQuery and AngularJS, will be covered. Interchange languages (JSON, XML) and responsive design will also be explored. Widgets will be examined to quickly develop solutions, and emphasis will be placed on tasks which provide further functionality. Conceptual and technical documentation, and samples, will be greatly utilized. The course will facilitate heavy engagement with the large and growing community of Web API developers. Offered once a year. Prerequisite: 430.600 Web GIS

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    430.621.81 - GIS for Emergency Management

    Paul Doherty

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have become an integral part of understanding the natural hazards in our world and how emergency management agencies respond to events and mitigate the impact of disasters. Furthermore, the advent of Web GIS has helped agencies overcome many challenges previously associated with GIS in Emergency Management. This course is an opportunity to learn about the use of GIS in studying natural hazards and apply cutting edge GIS technology to help emergency management agencies in the field. In today's device-driven world, maps need to work on mobile devices so there will be an emphasis on enabling GIS in the field. You will use Web GIS to deploy maps that assist agencies with their incident command functions: Planning, Operations, Logistics, Command, and Public Information. While the industry focus will be on Emergency Management, the knowledge, skills and abilities you develop will be widely applicable in both public and private sector industries. Offered once a year. Prerequisite: 430.601 Geographic Information Systems or permission of the instructor.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    470.792.81 - Social Science in National Security and Intelligence

    Todd Helmus

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/29 - 8/21

    This course examines the role of social science in national security decision making and intelligence. The course lectures, readings and classroom discussion are intended to help students understand the ambivalent relationship between social scientists on the one hand and intelligence personnel and national security policy makers on the other. It also considers the opportunities and limitations in the ways social science could contribute to policy making and how social science has contributed to key national issues. The course will help the student become a savvy consumer of social science.

    Technology fee: $200.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    470.748.51 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    Michael Warner

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/3 - 7/8
    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/29 - 7/10

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done particularly from an American-British perspective. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits.