Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Online Courses

    472.600.81 - Introduction to Geospatial Intelligence

    John O'Connor

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides an overview of the four disciplines that have merged to create the new discipline of geospatial intelligence and an introduction to the content of the program. The history of imagery analysis and digital cartography, the art of turning observation into insight and communicating those insights to non-experts, the science behind the sensors and platforms, and the mathematics behind imagery collection sampling strategies. The course studies the issues, technologies, and changes over the past 60 years that have developed into geospatial intelligence, and it will introduce the students to the opportunities and challenges of geospatial intelligence as it has shaped intelligence collection, analysis, reporting, and policy decisions. The outcomes of success in this profession have created new industries, and the course will also review the effects of commercial imagery, smallsats, non-governmental collection, and remotely piloted sensors. Students will be introduced to the concepts that will be covered through the remainder of the Master’s program through the Capstone exercise.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.610.81 - Collection Modelling and Management for Commercial Imagery

    James Vrabel

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course will begin with a brief history of commercial imagery. From there students will learn the fundamentals of various imaging sensor modalities (spectral, thermal, radar, motion imagery, etc.). Next, a historical perspective of collection management will be presented followed by changes to collection management due to technology advances within the commercial imaging industry. The strengths and weaknesses of collection models will be described, and students will learn to apply mathematically defined judgements to assess the value and cost of competitive imagery purchases. These judgments will examine the questions that drive the imagery purchase; the respective kinds of sensors and their applicability to certain questions, and the respective kinds of platforms for these sensors--aircraft, remotely piloted vehicles (drones), and different kinds of satellites, including smallsats (small satellites). The intended outcome would be the students understanding of the fundamentals of commercial imaging satellites and their collection criteria, through the comprehension of existing collection plans; the evaluation of existing collection plans; and the creation and budgeting for new collection plans.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.611.81 - Analyzing Social Media and Geospatial Information

    Veli-Pekka Kivimaki

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Social media is now present globally in everyday life, and in conflicts. With its reach, social media has also become an increasingly meaningful information source for scholars, advocacy groups, intelligence agencies, and others who are interested in shaping public discourse. This course introduces students to social media as part of present day open source information gathering, and how to plan collection and conduct analysis of information from social media. The course covers the operations security considerations, monitoring real time events, verification of online material, basics of social network analysis, and how to work with imagery sourced from social media, including geolocation of imagery. Automation and the limits of it in different phases of the process, and future developments in social media exploitation will also be discussed. During the course, students will conduct a hands-on investigation using social media data.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.612.81 - Geospatial Analysis: Communicating with Multiple Audiences

    Renny Babiarz

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    The course will cover the art of communicating geospatial intelligence in writing, photographs or images, and mapping. It will address the challenges of communicating technical information and intelligence from satellites, aircraft, and drones, into text, combinations of text, graphics, maps, and data base,. The students will perform their own analysis, and convert their intelligence discoveries into data bases, reporting, analysis, briefings, and video-based presentations.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.800.81 - Capstone in Geospatial Intelligence

    John O'Connor

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    The Capstone is the culmination of the instruction and the learning in the program. It provides the students an opportunity to demonstrate their applied knowledge of the four disciplines of geospatial intelligence—the history of the profession, the science of the sensors and platforms, the art of analysis and geospatial communication, and the mathematics of collection sampling strategies. In this semester-long experience, the student selects a mentor/advisor, identifies a geospatial issue of interest, defines a collection strategy, an analytic methodology, a reporting strategy, and a written summary product and presentation.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.602.81 - Remote Sensing: Systems and Applications

    Kenneth (Jon) Ranson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces remote sensing as an important technology to further our understanding of Earth's land, atmospheric, and oceanic processes. Students study remote sensing science, techniques, and satellite technologies to become familiar with the types of information that can be obtained and how this information can be applied in the natural and social sciences. Applications include assessment of land cover and land use, mapping and analysis of natural resources, weather and climate studies, pollution detection and monitoring, disaster monitoring, and identification of oceanographic features. Offered once a year in Spring.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.603.81 - Geospatial Statistics

    Orhun Aydin

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces theory and practical application of statistical methods in spatial analysis. Statistical fundamentals will be introduced to expose students to descriptive and inferential methods in spatial statistics. Geostatistical fundamentals will also be covered to introduce methods (in particular, kriging) for modelling spatial and spatio-temporal phenomena. This course will provide working knowledge of theory and practice in spatial statistics and Geostatistics, and will serve as a primer to more advanced courses in spatial statistics and machine learning. Theoretical knowledge will be supplemented with real-world use cases through in-class projects and assignments. Throughout the course, students will be exposed to open-source statistics libraries in R, no previous programming knowledge will be assumed. Offered twice a year.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.604.81 - Spatial Analytics

    Gergana Miller

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces students to using various techniques for solving spatial problems. The course teaches a proven process one can utilize to address common inquiries related to understanding spatial relationships and patterns. Traditional analytical methods such as suitability analysis, network analysis, geostatistical analysis, spatial interpolation, etc. are examined, along with recent data science and analytics methodologies that help us extract knowledge and insights from data. Examples and assignments are drawn from many applications, such as business, urban planning, public safety, public health, transportation and natural sciences. Offered twice a year. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.606.81 - Programming in GIS

    Paulus Zandbergen

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    In this course students will learn how to automate workflows and develop tools using Python as a fundamental language for geospatial technology. The course will first cover introductory python basics, then move into geospatial concepts. It will teach students how to automate simple and complex GIS tasks and functionality, thus simplifying workflows and increasing efficiency. Focus will be placed on following proper coding techniques and patterns. The course will introduce students to Python, ArcPy, Python API, Pandas, Numpy, Jupyter, and Markdown to name a few. Offered twice a year. Prerequisites: 430.600 Web GIS

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.610.81 - GIS for Infrastructure Management

    Mark Washington

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course will familiarize students with applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for infrastructure management. Building, utilizing and sharing reliable asset information and integrating enterprise data will be emphasized, in order to help stakeholders make informed decisions and capitalize on efficiencies of using GIS to support various kinds of facilities and infrastructure. Students will have the opportunity to use GIS applications to do project work in support of facility operations, strategic planning, real estate management, architecture design and construction, sustainability, utilities, buildings and interior space management, drones mapping, among others. Samples will be drawn from large university enterprise with multiple campus locations yet applicable to cities and various other settings. Research and spatial analysis will be conducted using recently acquired GIS orthoimagery, LIDAR and planimetric data for the Johns Hopkins' own Homewood campus. Prerequisite: 430.601 Geographic Information Systems.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.611.81 - Geospatial Ontologies and Semantics

    Dalia Varanka

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    The development of very large databases requires innovative approaches to data handling to efficiently communicate information meaning to users. The Geospatial Semantics and Ontologies course examines the foundations, design, and use of data structured as linked data, geospatial ontology, knowledge graphs, and related technology. Linked data and knowledge graphs are based on the node-edge-node triple data model to form graphs that can represent information networks. Triple graphs formatted as Resource Description Framework (RDF) can address challenges associated with information management such as inconsistencies within GIS applications, data associations within related enterprises, and information exchange over the Internet. The course begins with some general approaches to semantics and ontology, and basics of information interchange on the Internet. Linked Data in the form of Extensible Markup Language (XML), its extension Geography Markup Language (GML), and other standards for formal semantics such as Well Known Text (WKT) for specifying geographic coordinate geometries, SPARQL and GeoSPARQL query language, and Web Ontology Language (OWL) for automated logical reasoning and data inference are discussed. Subsequent lessons examine semantic system architecture, ontology design, and linked data mapping. No programming is required, but some required technical literacies, such as Java Script Object Notation (JSON) and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), are reviewed. Students complete a project in the last few weeks of the semester. The introductory skills offered in this course build a foundation for advanced geospatial Linked Data and Knowledge Graph applications in the future. Offered once a year. Prerequisite: 430.600 Web GIS

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.618.81 - Advanced Python Scripting for GIS

    Andrew Chapkowski

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course focuses on advanced uses of Python as a scripting tool to automate workflows in GIS and create customized applications. This includes the development of script tools, utilizing advanced ArcPy modules, working with third-party modules, implementing Python geoprocessing services, customizing GIS applications, and more advanced Python functionality. Offered once a year. Prerequisites: 430.606 Programming in GIS.

    Technology Fee $200.

    430.627.81 - Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Geospatial Technology

    Mansour Raad

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    The transformational impact of artificial intelligence and machine learning in geospatial data science is profound. This course presents a hands-on approach of applying automated modeling and predictive analytics to solve problems. Smart capabilities are powered by machine learning and GeoAI through the use of correlations of pattern detection to build predictive models and classify outcomes for data never seen before. Use cases from various sectors focusing on prediction and optimization, finding patterns and correlations, advanced object detection and automatic feature extraction, are examined. Offered once a year. Prerequisites: 430.606 Programming in GIS. Python programming experience is required.

    Technology Fee $200.

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence


    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces students to the field of intelligence, particularly as practiced in the United States. After a brief overview of the historical foundations of modern intelligence, it discusses how intelligence was conducted during the 20th century including collection, analysis, counterintelligence, covert action, and oversight. It then discusses the disruptive influences of September 11, the Iraq War, and new technologies. The course concludes with a discussion of the “democratization of intelligence."

    Technology Fee: $200.00