Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.624.51 - Ocean Stewardship and Sustainability

    Alexios Monopolis

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/3 - 7/31
    Saturday 10:00 - 3:00; 7/3 - 7/31

    Our oceans represent the final frontier of human exploration and discovery on Earth. Indeed, we have a greater understanding of the moon's surface than we do of the depths below the ocean’s surface. Although oceans are home to an extraordinary amount of biodiversity, over 95% of the ocean remains unexplored and over 90% of species have yet to be classified.

    What we do know, however, is that our oceans are under significant threat for human activities and a growing global population. Overfishing, plastic pollution, ocean warming and acidification threaten to undermine the ability of the ocean to sustain global systems that are critical for sustaining life on Earth. Indeed, the ocean produces half the planet’s oxygen, absorbs a quarter of all carbon dioxide emissions, feeds 3 billion people, and contributes $3 trillion per year to the global economy.

    This course will examine how to protect our oceans, in order to reduce pollution, restore and protect marine and coastal ecosystems, minimize ocean acidification, end overfishing and illegal harvesting, revitalize fish stocks, advance sustainable fishing practices, preserve endangered species, strengthen the rule of domestic and international law, promote innovation in ocean governance, and increase scientific knowledge, research and technology that supports ocean health.

    This course provides a holistic and systems-based view of how the ocean functions, human interactions with those functions and innovative policies and sustainable solutions to environmental problems stemming from those interactions.

    This class will follow a modified schedule. Class will be held on Wednesdays from 6:8:45 and Saturday class will be held from 10-3 on the following dates: July 3, 6, 10, 13, 17, 20, 24,27 and 31.

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    James Taylor

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.604.81 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.605.81 - Maritime Law and the Environment

    Elizabeth Geltman

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    The course is designed to introduce students to the process by which environmental policy can be implemented as law in the international sphere. “Law of the Sea” formed the foundation of modern public international law. It also represents the world’s first efforts to define and regulate a “global commons” and to grapple with the management of resources as the “common heritage of mankind”. Topics explored include freedom of navigation on the high seas, the limits on port-state jurisdiction over foreign vessels, and the scope of coastal nations’ power to regulate activities in their respective territorial waters, “contiguous zones”, and “exclusive economic zones”. The course also examines how the UNCLOS regime functions in tandem with other treaties, customary international law, the role of voluntary standards (such as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International and International Organization for Standardization (ISO)) and domestic law in addressing specific current issues - including management of living and nonliving resources on the Continental Shelf, deep seabed mining, reduction of pollution, protection of highly migratory fish stocks, aquaculture, “marine dead zones”, and the future of ocean policy.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.608.81 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    Jorge Santiago-Blay

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Helen Serassio
    Rhey Solomon

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.641.81 - Natural Resources Law and Policy

    Elizabeth Geltman

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course introduces students to federal and state legislation and policies of critical importance in natural resource management. Students explore such issues as regulation of ocean fishing, coastal zone management, mineral exploitation and associated environmental impact, water allocation and quality, hazardous waste cleanup programs under the Superfund law, urban industrial infrastructure such as water and sewage systems, land use management, and water and air pollution control. Offered onsite of online every two years. Completing 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis is recommended. An equivalent course or experience may also suffice.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.650.81 - International Environmental Policy

    Elizabeth Hessami

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course explores the methods and strategies for promoting solutions to global environmental problems. Through consideration of issues such as stratospheric ozone depletion, global climate change, tropical deforestation, loss of biodiversity, transnational pollution, and other threats to the international commons, students examine policymaking from the perspective of developed and developing countries, the United Nations system, international financial entities, and nongovernmental interest groups. By investigating important international agreements, students determine how far the international community has come in solving specific problems, what obstacles prevent effective international solutions, and what needs to be done to overcome barriers. Offered onsite or online, infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.660.81 - Strategies in Watershed Management

    Glenn Patterson

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    Watersheds are often thought of as the basic organizing units for landscapes and the natural resources they support. As water is a fundamental resource that shapes landscapes, nourishes life, provides habitat and recreation, and transports sediments, nutrients, and wastes, prudent management of watersheds is critical for thriving ecosystems and human populations. The course comprises ten on-line modules students, each with topical content, web pages to visit, readings in the required text, and a quiz. Most modules also have discussions, and some have other assignments. The final discussion is a brief essay on a relevant topic of the student's choice. Students are introduced to definitions of ‘watershed’ and ‘watershed management’ in the context of natural resources science and policy. There is a brief review of basic hydrology, a look at the history of watershed management, and examination of the institutions and legislation that control activities affect watershed management. We discuss threats to watershed health, sources of information to guide watershed managers, and practices that can ameliorate the threats. Through case histories, the students are exposed to the collaborative process for assessing, protecting, and restoring watersheds. Offered online, annually.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.665.81 - Climate Change on the Front Lines: The Study of Adaptation in Developing Countries

    Amir Poudel

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    Poor and developing countries are predicted to bear the brunt of climate change. This course will focus on key sectors such as agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, water resources, human health, and tourism and the ways in which poorer and developing counties are impacted by and adapting to climate change. This course may focus on a region or a specific country depending on the instructor. Assessment and evaluation of demographic trends, environmental challenges such as retreating ice, potential flood hazards, ecosystem impacts, as well as health issues will be incorporated. International instruments such as adaptation funds, carbon funds, clean development mechanisms, and reduced deforestation/degradation strategies and policies will be investigated in a comparative analysis of impacts and adaptation responses of countries around the world. Offered online, annually.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    420.703.81 - Open Source GIScience for Environmental Research

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This course on Free and Open Source GIS is targeted at students who already have some experience working with ArcGIS and want to learn about alternative software packages. The course will discuss the advantages and disadvantages? of open source GIS in contrast with more commercial GIS offerings. Geographic Information Science is now embedded in just about everything we do. From Google Maps to geotagging to wearable technology. Depending on your career choice, commercial software may not always be available for use or affordable. However, there are free, Open Source GIS software options available and as these tools become more powerful, more employers are adding knowledge of these software packages as required or desired skills. In this course, students will use free, publicly available environmental geographic data to perform GIS and remote sensing tasks using Open Source Software (e.g. QGIS, Remap, EO Browser). Students will learn how to obtain, create, analyze, assess, generate, and visualize environmental data relevant to environmental science fields like habitat assessment, natural disturbances, conservation, and landscape ecology.

    Technology fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International

    420.623.91 - Freshwater Ecology & Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems

    Paul Kazyak

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/15 - 8/21

    This course focuses on the ecology, protection, and restoration of non-tidal waters. Students study the biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the waters and riparian zones. There is also a focus on ecological responses to anthropogenic activity and approaches to protection and damage mitigation in freshwater ecosystems. Ongoing and planned protection and restoration activities in Maryland and elsewhere are presented. Students develop holistic restoration plans based on existing ecological data. Two weekend field trips are required parts of the course. Offered every two years. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology.

    This course will follow a unique schedule with online lectures and the main instructional component will be in the field. The field portion will be held at Thorpe Wood, MD from June 26-30. There is a $450 trip fee for this course. Please see the following website for details: https://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-freshwater-ecology/

    420.627.91 - Great Lakes Ecology and Management

    Paul Kazyak

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    This intensive course examines the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the Great Lakes aquatic ecosystem as well as its governance, policy-making and management. State-of-the-science, socio-economic relationships, human impacts and restoration activities are also explored, often by presentations from regional experts. Daily lecture topics are reinforced with numerous field experiences to an array of sites throughout Michigan. Students will also be exposed to hands-on sampling, learn about long-term monitoring programs and participate in developing alternative management strategies.

    Payment is due at the time of registration (tuition $4,091 + course fee $1,450). If a student decides to drop this course, $500 of the tuition is non-refundable, regardless of a student’s payment method choice (financial aid, employer assistance, tuition remission, etc). Please note: this course does not follow the regular tuition refund schedule and all tuition and fees for this course are NON-REFUNDABLE when registration closes. Please see the following website for course details: https://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-great-lakes-ecology-and-management/

    420.637.91 - Conservation Biology and Wildlife Management

    Albert Manville

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    In this course students examine the meaning and implications of biodiversity with a focus on disciplines associated with conservation biology, wildlife conservation and wildlife management, including taxonomy, genetics, small population biology, chemical and restoration ecology, and marine biology. This includes exploring how conservation biology differs from other natural sciences in theory and in application. Students learn the major threats to biodiversity and what natural and social science methods and alternatives are used to mitigate, stop, or reverse these threats. The course also includes the economic and cultural tradeoffs associated with each conservation measure at the global, national, regional, and local levels. The course is taught in the seminar-style with field trips. Offered in person in Baltimore, Washington DC or off-site annually. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    Tuition $3972 (subject to change) and Field Trip $1690. This course has a non-refundable $500 fee. If you drop this course prior to Feb 28, you will be refunded the tuition only. If you drop this course after March 22, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 10 students to run. Students should have completed Principles and Methods of Ecology prior to the field component. Open Registration Dates: November 1, 2018 at 10:00 AM to February 28, 2019 at 11:59 PM. Link: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-conservation-biology-and-wildlife-management-in-montana/

    420.738.91 - Newfoundland and Labrador: A Journey Through Time

    Jerry Burgess

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    The field course will examine the birth of the N. American Continent, the creation and destruction of oceans, human ecology, climate change, whaling and marine fisheries around the Labrador Sea and the Grand Banks. Highlights will include three remarkable UNESCO World Heritage sites:

    • Gros Morne National Park, featuring majestic fjords and glacial valleys;
    • L’Anse aux Meadows, North America’s first authenticated Viking settlement;
    • Red Bay, the 16th-century Labrador home to over 1,500 Basque whalers.
    • Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, site representing the oldest multicellular life on Earth.

    Tuition $3972 (subject to change) and Field Trip $750. This course has a non-refundable $500 fee. If you drop this course prior to Feb 28, you will be refunded the tuition only. If you drop this course after March 22, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 10 students to run. Students should have completed Geological Foundations or an equivalent prior to the field component. Open Registration Dates: Start November 1, 2018 at 10:00 AM to February 28, 2019 at 11:59 PM. Link: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/international-study-newfoundland-and-labrador-a-journey-through-time/