Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Homewood Campus

    420.614.01 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Alexios Monopolis

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 4/29

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.604.51 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    Joel Carr

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/27 - 5/4

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    420.608.51 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    Nathaniel Winstead

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/5

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    420.616.51 - Environmental Consequences of Conventional Energy Generation

    Jerry Burgess

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 4/30

    Environmental consequences of conventional energy generation will explore the energy resources that have driven and are projected to be the primary energy sources worldwide for the next several decades. Specifically, this course will focus on the historical and future role of conventional energy sources such as those derived from fossil fuels, focusing on their geologic genesis and the consequences of resource extraction which will invite comparisons to more recent trends in energy generation. Students will be exposed to the nexus of social, technical, engineering and environmental challenges of providing energy supplies to an increasingly urban and technologically connected global population. Topics include petroleum, traditional natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, and geothermal supplies as well as recent trends in shale hydrologic fracturing methods of obtaining petroleum resources. Environmental impacts will focus on mining, resource extraction, soil and groundwater contamination as well as particulates, smog, acid rain, and global warming. Global production, distribution, usage and impacts of these resources will be considered. Offered online, annually. Prerequisites: none.

    Field Trip Fee: $75.00

    420.625.51 - Ecology and Ecosystem Management in Coastal and Estuarine Systems

    Kevin Brittingham
    Paul Kazyak

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 4/29
    Saturday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/25 - 5/2

    This course examines the physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting coastal and estuarine ecosystems with special emphasis on the Chesapeake Bay as a model system. Human influences on such large and critical ecosystems and the policy decisions made to manage and minimize human impact are explored in lecture and seminar formats. Topics include the hydrodynamics of shallow tidal waters; energy and material flows and transformations; diversity and adaptation of plant, animal, and microbial communities; population and pollution ecology; and ecosystem management. Case histories illustrate problems in fisheries management and the eutrophication of the coastal and estuarine systems. Offered annually, on-site. Required weekend field trips are included. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    This course has two anticipated field trips and will be co-taught by two of our faculty. One trip will be to the National Aquarium and the other a 3.5 day trip to the Chesapeake Bay Foundations facility on the Eastern Shore of MD. Accordingly, the meeting times are non-standard and follow the following schedule: 25 Jan (Saturday) 1 Feb (Saturday) 5 Feb (Wednesday) 15 Feb (Saturday) 22 Feb (Saturday) 26 Feb (Wednesday) 4 Mar (Wednesday) 11 Mar (Wednesday) 25 Mar (Wednesday) 1 Apr (Saturday) 6 May (Wednesday) Field Trip Experience 23-26 April (Chesapeake Bay) Field Trip Fee $400.00. This course does not follow a regular schedule.

    420.800.51 - Independent Research Project in Environmental Sciences and Policy

    Paul Kazyak

    The independent research project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in their courses, develop expertise on a specific environmental topic, work closely with an expert in the field, and improve their professional writing skills. Students who take this elective must identify a project topic and a Mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The Mentor may be a faculty member teaching in the program or elsewhere at JHU, a qualified and appropriate person from the student's place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. A preliminary proposal must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor prior to enrollment in the course. In order to enroll in the class, permission of instructor is required. Final proposals for the IRP must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the IRP is to be completed. A Mentor Agreement form must be completed and returned at the beginning of the semester in which the student in take the I.R.P. course. This form is sent to the Mentor by the Course Instructor once the final proposal is approved. For more information please go to the ESP website => The Experience => IRP. Offered every term and scheduled as needed.

    Instructor permission required for this IRP in Sustainability Leadership

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    James Taylor

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.302.81 - Chemistry of Natural Processes

    Steven Bennett

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of chemistry, of Earth’s interrelated chemical systems, and of how to manipulate and interpret chemical data. Topics include molecules and chemical bonding, states of matter, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Through a series of exercises, students apply chemistry principles to solve real-world environmental problems. Prerequisite: Students are urged to take 420.301 Quantitative Methods for Environmental Sciences before enrolling in this course. Offered online only, one to two times annually.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.601.82 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    Barbara Souter

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Online Tech Fee: $200.00

    420.603.81 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.604.81 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.605.81 - Maritime Law and the Environment

    Elizabeth Geltman

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    The course is designed to introduce students to the process by which environmental policy can be implemented as law in the international sphere. “Law of the Sea” formed the foundation of modern public international law. It also represents the world’s first efforts to define and regulate a “global commons” and to grapple with the management of resources as the “common heritage of mankind”. Topics explored include freedom of navigation on the high seas, the limits on port-state jurisdiction over foreign vessels, and the scope of coastal nations’ power to regulate activities in their respective territorial waters, “contiguous zones”, and “exclusive economic zones”. The course also examines how the UNCLOS regime functions in tandem with other treaties, customary international law, the role of voluntary standards (such as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International and International Organization for Standardization (ISO)) and domestic law in addressing specific current issues - including management of living and nonliving resources on the Continental Shelf, deep seabed mining, reduction of pollution, protection of highly migratory fish stocks, aquaculture, “marine dead zones”, and the future of ocean policy.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.608.81 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.610.81 - Sustainable Business

    Diana Watts

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides an introduction to sustainable business strategies practiced by US companies. Students will examine the evolution of CSR and triple bottom line management in the context of competing stakeholder interests. Given that sustainability practices differ by sector, company and country, specific illustrations will be discussed in relation to deforestation, water and waste. Attention will be placed on evolving regulatory regimes including compliance mechanisms such as certification and auditing as well as voluntary partnering with NGO’s and government agencies. The discussion of sustainable business strategies will be approached as a policy debate that continues to be shaped at both the national and global levels.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    Jorge Santiago-Blay

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Rhey Solomon
    Andree DuVarney

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.614.82 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    Andree DuVarney

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.632.81 - Air Quality Management and Policy

    Christa Hasenkopf

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Understanding and mitigating air pollution, both indoor and outdoor, is of extreme importance to global health. In fact, the World Health Organization released a statement in 2014 that in 2012, approximately 7 million people died - one in eight of total global deaths around the world - as a result of air pollution exposure. Air pollution also has an impact on climate change, in terms of its abilities to both exacerbate and reduce global warming. This course provides an overview of the principles, effects, and policies regarding outdoor air pollution with an emphasis on emerging international air pollution issues, public health and environmental impacts of outdoor air pollution, and evolving ways to monitor air pollution, from low-cost sensors to satellite techniques. Course topics include: history of air pollution events and management; major air pollutants and sources; atmospheric chemistry, transport and dispersion; measurement and monitoring; control technology; effects on human health and climate; and regulatory requirements. The effectiveness of the Clean Air Act, approaches toward air quality management in other countries, international treaties, future air quality projections, and regulatory case studies will also be discussed. Offered online, infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.608 Oceanic and Atmospheric Processes, an equivalent course or experience, or approval of the instructor.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.644.81 - Sustainable Cities

    Eileen McGurty

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course examines urbanization and its impacts on the environment. The goal of the course is to better understand how urbanization contributes to ecological damage as well as how cities can be constructed in ecologically healthy ways. Topics include land use planning transportation, waste, management, water quality, open space/greening, green building technology, urban design, and urban ecology. The course takes an international perspective by using case studies of cities in North America, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The case studies also include a wide range of cities with different populations, geographic scale, and growth rates. Final projects are an in-depth study of one particular city of the student's choice and its attempts to implement programs for sustainability. Offered online, annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.650.81 - International Environmental Policy

    Elizabeth Hessami

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course explores the methods and strategies for promoting solutions to global environmental problems. Through consideration of issues such as stratospheric ozone depletion, global climate change, tropical deforestation, loss of biodiversity, transnational pollution, and other threats to the international commons, students examine policymaking from the perspective of developed and developing countries, the United Nations system, international financial entities, and nongovernmental interest groups. By investigating important international agreements, students determine how far the international community has come in solving specific problems, what obstacles prevent effective international solutions, and what needs to be done to overcome barriers. Offered onsite or online, infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.656.81 - Environmental Impact Assessment & Decision Methods

    Rhey Solomon
    Helen Serassio

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces the process of environmental impact assessment and policy decision making as required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ). Topics include identification of purpose and need for any actions affecting the environment, development of objectives and decision criteria, and various techniques for assessing impact and comparing alternatives for a given environmental intervention. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches are evaluated with techniques that allow analysis of multiple objectives and conflicting uses of environmental resources. The importance of scientific credibility and public acceptance is demonstrated with actual cases. Offered onsite or online annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.659.81 - Management for Environmental Results with Performance-based Measurement

    Arthur Koines

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    At all levels of government and throughout private industry, performance-based initiatives now place unprecedented demands on environmental managers to achieve measurable environmental results. The goal of the various performance based initiatives is to give environmental managers a systematic understanding of the causes of environmental problems, both natural and anthropogenic, and their human, ecological and economic effects. It is also at the heart of sound environmental impact analysis, risk assessment, and benefit-cost analysis. In this course, students learn the foundations and applications of modern performance-based initiatives. Using case studies taken from a variety of environmental programs, students learn to use available scientific knowledge to uncover the likely keys to program success. Students learn why success has so often eluded environmental managers in the past. The goal of this class is for students to critically assess the design, performance measurement and management of environmental programs on all scales and to recommend effective improvements. Students will develop skills for implementing results oriented environmental management. Offered onsite or online, annually.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.888.81 - Capstone or Thesis Continuation

    Jerry Burgess
    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Noncredit. This course is for students who completed 420.801 Independent Research Project or 420.805 Internship and Thesis but failed to finish an approved paper or thesis. Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the above course but have not yet completed their paper. Students must register for this course and pay its accompanying fee for every term until a final paper is approved.

  • Off-Site or International

    420.630.91 - Tropical Ecology and Conservation of African Wildlife

    Jennifer da Rosa
    Romeo Kamta Tchoffo
    Peter Houlihan

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/2 - 1/21

    This is an immersive study abroad field course in Cameroon, Africa with a strong focus in tropical ecology field methods for the purpose of conserving African wildlife. The Congo Basin is the second largest tropical rainforest in the world, storing an estimated 25-30 million tons of carbon stocks, and home to nearly 20% of Earth’s species. There is a critical need to better understand the Congo Basin’s rainforests because we cannot conserve what we do not understand. The field component of this course takes place at the Dja Nature Reserve in southeast Cameroon at a remote research station operated by the Congo Basin Institute. The Dja rainforest is a diverse and understudied ecosystem. This course will cover basic field methods including but not limited to biodiversity assessments, species population estimates, setting up and checking large mammal camera traps, auditory surveys of primate vocalizations, mist netting for tropical birds, and other field techniques. Couse content will focus on problems such as ecological impacts of biodiversity loss, drivers of wildlife poaching, conservation strategies and best practices. Students will be introduced to local leaders in conservation, members of the community from the ecosystems we’ll be working in, as well as indigenous residents from the Baka tribal group. This course will also explore the broader social, political, economic, and climate change impacts to wildlife conservation efforts in Africa. Prerequisite: AS.420.611 – Principles and Methods of Ecology.

    Prerequisite: AS.420.611 - Principles and Methods of Ecology. Field Trip Fee: $3,500 Course onsite in Cameroon dates: Jan 3-18, 2020 Registration opens: May 15, 2019 Registration closes: August 30, 2019

    420.670.91 - Sustainability Leadership

    Paul Kazyak

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/2 - 1/21

    Using a highly interactive format, this course examines practical, state-of-the-art concepts in leadership, with a focus on the unique challenges of sustainability facing our world. Students will examine the essential components of leadership, including vision, communication, strategy, organization, synergy and strategy. Recognition of barriers and risks and how to work around them will be stressed, and the restricted conditions under which leadership is actually exercised will be revealed. Students will also practice self-reflection/assessment and become familiar with advanced tools to improve their leadership ability. Coursework will include frequent work in small groups, review of leadership case studies and a practical, ‘real-world’ vision development project. Offered only as a compressed field course every other January intersession.

    Registration for this course will open on September 16, 2019, at 10 am and will close on October 21, 2019. Payment (Course Fee = $1600.00) is due at the time of registration. If a student decides to drop this course, $500 of the tuition is non-refundable, regardless of a student’s payment method choice (financial aid, employer assistance, tuition remission, etc.). Please note: this course does not follow the regular tuition refund schedule and all tuition and fees for this course are nonrefundable after October 21, 2019. Details are at: https://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/international-study-sustainability-leadership/

    420.681.91 - Climate Change Adaptation and Development in Nepal

    Amir Poudel
    Karin Orr

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/2 - 1/21

    This is a field course that takes a firsthand look at the reality of climate change adaptation at various scales as it is experienced in in a developing country such as Nepal. Specifically it considers Nepal’s vulnerability and resilience to climate change at the national, district and community levels, and will review adaptation instruments and actions at all levels and the political context in which they are executed. Specific topics to be covered include climate change by sector, vulnerability at various scales, institutional and community-based plans for mitigation and adaptation, institutional and legal mechanisms that address climate change, extension efforts, climate change integration into development, and current effort by developing countries such as Nepal in carbon-financing and other topics. The course will also consider how funding to support climate change adaptation intersects and overlaps with development aid and planning. The course will start and end in Kathmandu, the capital city, where students will meet with policy makers, government officials and experts. We will also travel to communities in the three biophysical regions of Nepal, the highlands, the middle hills and the lowlands (Terai). In all locales students will interact with stakeholders all various kinds and be exposed to the great cultural, economic, political, and biophysical diversity of Nepal. Course prerequisite: 420.665.81, Climate Change on the Front Lines: The Study of Adaptation in Developing Countries, or permission of the instructor.

    Registration for this course will open on September 16, 2019, at 10 am and will close on November 15, 2019. Notes: Payment is due at the time of registration. If a student decides to drop this course, $500 of the tuition is non-refundable, regardless of a student’s payment method choice (financial aid, employer assistance, tuition remission, etc.). Please note: this course does not follow the regular tuition refund schedule and all tuition and fees for this course are nonrefundable after October 21, 2019. Website for details: https://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/international-study-nepal/

    420.805.91 - Internship and Capstone Thesis

    Jerry Burgess
    Jennifer da Rosa

    This course is designed to allow students to have a Capstone/Thesis Internship Experience, a Group Research Project as well as the standard Capstone (Independent Research Project) in an internship format. Advanced students in the MS in Environmental Science and Policy program may propose an internship to receive on-the-job experience in science or science policy or a related profession. An approved internship receives one full course credit toward the MS in ESP degree usually an elective. Students may propose to participate in existing internship programs, or they may arrange a unique experience. In most cases, students should have completed four or more courses toward their degree before seeking an internship, and proposals must be submitted in writing to program leadership at least 30 days before the start of the target term. Proposals are evaluated on a competitive basis. Only a limited number will be approved, and priority will be given to students who have completed the most degree-level courses and who submit proposals that demonstrate the best internship experience. Internships may be paid or unpaid. To complete the course, students must write a robust paper designed for peer-review. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course in conjunction with a mentor as part of the internship experience. Because students receive academic course credit for internships, they pay tuition levels equal to one graduate course.

    Permission required before being admitted to the course.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    425.800.81 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Michael Schwebel

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    430.602.81 - Remote Sensing: Systems and Applications

    Kenneth (Jon) Ranson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces remote sensing as an important technology to further our understanding of Earth's land, atmospheric, and oceanic processes. Students study remote sensing science, techniques, and satellite technologies to become familiar with the types of information that can be obtained and how this information can be applied in the natural and social sciences. Applications include assessment of land cover and land use, mapping and analysis of natural resources, weather and climate studies, pollution detection and monitoring, disaster monitoring, and identification of oceanographic features. Offered once a year in Spring.

    Technology Fee $200.

  • Homewood Campus (Cross-Listed)

    430.629.01 - Drones in Geospatial Decision Making

    James Blanchard

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 3/11 - 5/5
    Monday 9:00 - 5:00; 4/27 - 4/27
    TWTh 9:00 - 5:00; 4/28 - 4/30

    This compressed format field course will explore current and future techniques of close-range remote sensing utilizing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) for environmental monitoring, urban cybersensing, and infrastructure assessment related to emergency response, leading to FAA Remote Pilot Certification to operate UAVs for commercial, professional, and research purposes. The course will focus on four basic objectives: (1) demonstrating knowledge and operational skills to successfully execute data acquisition using a variety of UAV remote sensing collection devices; (2) applying different methods of data acquisition and processing to identify, cross-validate and interpret data collected from UAV sensors; (3) discussing existing and emerging trends of UAV applications in various academic and professional situations, and (4) synthesizing and extrapolating data from these novel collection techniques to solve real-world problems. Students will act as flight crewmembers and scientific crew on numerous daily missions during the field portion of the course. Prerequisite: 430.600 Web GIS, or 420.603 Environmental Applications of GIS, or introductory GIS course.