Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: We currently are not accepting applications to the online Master of Science in Energy Policy and Climate from students who reside in Kansas. Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs.

  • Washington DC Center

    425.601.51 - Principles and Applications of Energy Technology

    Thomas Jenkin

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/27 - 5/4

    The course examines energy supply and consumption, and how these activities impact the environment, with a focus on understanding the potential technology, market structure and policy implications for climate change. Students will gain a solid understanding of the science, economics, environmental impact associated with various electricity generation technologies, including renewable energy, conventional generation (existing and future), carbon storage and sequestration, and electricity storage. Transportation topics will address a variety of technologies, including hybrids and fuels cells, as well as the potential role for alternative fuels, including biofuels. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    425.602.51 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    Daniel Barrie

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/5

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    425.800.51 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Daniel Zachary

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 4/30

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    research fee $25

  • Online Courses

    425.603.81 - Climate Change Policy Analysis

    Jairo Garcia

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    After a study of the historical development of climate change policy, this course analyzes current policy options for mitigating and adapting to long-term climate change. The course will examine various approaches available in the U.S. for national-level policy, including regulatory and market-based approaches, particularly cap and trade and carbon taxation. Various models for designing a cap and trade system will be studied, including the European experience and regional programs in the United States. Special attention will be paid to methods for setting initial prices and accounting for discounting of future benefits. The course will focus primarily on national-level carbon management policies, but international agreements will also be included, as well as equity considerations on a global level.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.604.81 - Energy & Climate Finance

    Craig Hart

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    This course introduces students to environmental markets and the policies that create them, focusing mainly on emissions trading systems to mitigate climate change. The course also provides an introduction to attributes of the financial sector through its analysis of markets for environmental commodities Students learn the economic theory behind market-based environmental policy instruments, such as tradable renewable energy credits, carbon offsets, and water rights in a semester of lectures featuring presentations from practitioners, including state and federal government, private companies subject to market-based emissions regulation, commodity brokers, and representatives from international institutions. Offered online on-site twice per year.

    425.624.81 - Wind Energy:Science, Technology and Policy

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Topics include the assessment of wind resources, basic principles of wind turbines and power transmission, electric markets and wind power, technological and economic aspect of storage of intermittent wind power, legal issues at state and federal levels, international water issues, and environmental impact assessment processes for wind developments. Offered on-site at least once every two years. Prerequisite: 425.601 Principles and Applications of Energy Technology.

    425.638.81 - Adaptation to Climate Change

    Thomas Peterson

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    Global climate change risks are increasingly complex and may ultimately affect virtually every facet of our economic, energy, community, and environmental systems. At the same time, policy and investment responses to climate resiliency needs are similarly complex, controversial, and high stakes. Perhaps no issue facing leaders of today and tomorrow is more cross- cutting in nature or in greater need of improved understanding and capability than climate change risk. This course will provide a comprehensive framework for understanding, assessing, and applying climate change risk, vulnerability, a hazard assessment for the development of risk reduction an adaptation response. In the process, it will examine the status, limitations, and strengths of current assessment and action planning approaches across varying sectors, scales, and impact areas. The course will also include a review of methods prioritizing actions and addressing feasibility, flexibility, and logistical needs as applied to specific facilities, such as military installations, as well broader communities and multistate regions. Individual and group learning exercises will be involved. Offered on-site at least once every two years.

    technology fee

    425.647.81 - Energy and Water Security in South Asia

    Amardeep Dhanju

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and Maldives) is home to more than 1.7 billion people (nearly 25% of the global population). It is also a region of rapidly growing economies, rising energy consumption, and increasing environmental stress. Fossil fuels, particularly coal is the major source of electricity in the region, contributing to rising greenhouse gas emissions and worsening air quality. India in particular is promoting the use of indigenous coal to power its economic growth. At the household level, inefficient use of biomass for cooking and heating continues to be a major health and environmental hazard. Moreover, fresh water stress and pollution has reached alarming levels in the region with far reaching impacts on agriculture and human health.

    South Asia is uniquely vulnerable to climate change impacts. On the one hand, receding Himalayan glaciers in Nepal, India, Pakistan and Bhutan are exacerbating water stress and threatening food security for more than a 1 billion people. And on the other hand, Bangladesh and Maldives are prone to sea level rise and coastal flooding from powerful tropical storms.

    Creating a sustainable energy and freshwater pathway is intrinsically linked to innovative development approaches tailored to local and regional variabilities. In order to curb growing emissions, the region is promoting renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, and micro hydro power. However, the unmet demand for energy, particularly electricity remains so large in South Asia that fossil fuels are expected to be a major part of the future energy mix. Water stress is being managed through a mix of traditional and modern techniques.

    Given the demographic size of the region and the pent-up energy demand, it can be argued that the success of global climate change initiatives (such as the 2015 Paris agreement) in large part is cont

    425.800.81 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Michael Schwebel

    Online 1/22 - 5/5

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Research Fee: $25.00