Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Online Courses

    492.601.81 - Fundamentals of Writing for Graduate Students

    April Dickey

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This intensive writing course offers students a foundation in essay composition and provides an in-depth review of sentence structure, grammar, and punctuation. Designed for those students who need to improve their written communication skills, the curriculum in Writing Basics examines the various techniques writers use to compose their sentences, to establish syntactic relationships within paragraphs, to draft thesis and transitional sentences, and to relate syntactic structure to ideas. Students will master a basic format for the expository or argumentative essay that will include strategies for finding and drafting a thesis, for shaping a proof of that thesis, and for drawing conclusions that demonstrate synthetic, independent thinking. Working through multiple drafts of their essays, students will develop strategies for revision that will focus on both syntax and structure. Note: AS.492.601, Fundamentals of Writing for Graduate Students has been designed for students in all AAP Programs who seek additional help to strengthen their writing skills. The course is not intended for students in the Teaching Writing Program, and Teaching Writing students should not sign up for it.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.612.81 - Teaching Writing

    Mark Farrington

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This core course is designed for teachers in all disciplines and at all grade levels who use writing in their teaching and who have an interest in exploring their own writing as well. Someone not currently in a classroom can also complete the course successfully. The course has three main goals: 1. To help participants add to their existing knowledge of teaching writing, focusing particularly on writing as process and the various methods and practices that focus on each individual stage of that process (prewriting, drafting, responding, revising, editing and publishing). 2. To encourage participants to reflect upon their current practices in teaching writing, helping them clarify for themselves their goals and methods in teaching writing, and to provide additional ideas and possibilities that might add to their existing “tool box”. 3. To allow participants to engage in their own writing and writing process, in order to experience both roles of writer and writing teacher, and to see how one’s own writing experiences can enhance one’s knowledge as a teacher of writing. In addition, participants will consider the relationship of reading and writing, will become familiar with leading theories and theorists on the teaching of writing, will share their ideas, their knowledge, and their experiences, and will be encouraged to adapt their learning to make it most useful to their individual teaching situations (grade level, discipline, student population, etc.).

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.630.81 - The Power of Story: Teaching and Writing Narrative

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course is designed for participants who wish to teach and write fictional, factual, and poetic narrative. The course covers elements of narrative, including plot, character, setting, tone, pacing, dialogue, and theme, plus the terms writers use to discuss and analyze narrative. Program participants learn how to introduce this language in their classrooms and to engage their own students in discussion about assigned reading and writing. Participants in this course write original narratives from prompts and discuss those writings in a workshop environment. Participants may also read narrative poems, short stories, one or more novels or novel excerpts, and one or more nonfiction narratives, with an eye toward how reading can inform and enrich the writing experience, as well as reading articles on teaching process and theory – including recent brain research concerning the value of narrative. This course also helps teachers understand the differences between factual and nonfactual writing, and how they can be separated or combined.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.632.81 - Teaching Creative Writing

    Mark Farrington
    Catherine Hailey

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course is designed for participants who wish to write and/or teach fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The course covers elements of writing in each genre, as well as the creative process and the similarities and differences between creative and other forms of writing. The course will also include readings in creative writing and lessons on how to use literature in a creative writing class. With the goal of integrating their writing and knowledge into their own classrooms, participants produce their own original creative writing and discuss it in a workshop environment. This course also may cover elements of playwriting and screenwriting.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.635.81 - Teaching and Writing Nonfiction

    Joanne Cavanaugh-Simpson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course explores various forms of nonfiction via reading and writing, including personal essays, speeches, opinion pieces, essays about art or literature, biographies, memoirs, journalism, and historical, scientific, or technical accounts written for a broad audience. Students will read nonfiction works as writers and teachers, and will practice various strategies for in-depth research (including deeper evaluation of online sources.) A primary course focus includes the selection and exploration of mentor texts for various reading levels, and nonfiction treatments of various topics, including history. Students will hone their own nonfiction writing skills to enhance clarity, precision, and grace in their work, and will learn teaching methods to encourage students' clear and coherent writing, organization and style. Course also emphasizes classroom community, interactivity, and personal engagement with instructor and classmates.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.635.82 - Teaching and Writing Nonfiction

    Joanne Cavanaugh-Simpson

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course explores various forms of nonfiction via reading and writing, including personal essays, speeches, opinion pieces, essays about art or literature, biographies, memoirs, journalism, and historical, scientific, or technical accounts written for a broad audience. Students will read nonfiction works as writers and teachers, and will practice various strategies for in-depth research (including deeper evaluation of online sources.) A primary course focus includes the selection and exploration of mentor texts for various reading levels, and nonfiction treatments of various topics, including history. Students will hone their own nonfiction writing skills to enhance clarity, precision, and grace in their work, and will learn teaching methods to encourage students' clear and coherent writing, organization and style. Course also emphasizes classroom community, interactivity, and personal engagement with instructor and classmates.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.660.81 - Writing for Young Readers

    Susan Muaddi-darraj

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    This course focuses on reading and writing stories and books for children and young adults. Readings include poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Participants read published writing geared toward young readers with an eye toward understanding techniques and approaches to writing for this particular audience. They also write their own works designed for young readers. The course goals are threefold: to focus on teaching students to read children’s and young adult literature; teaching students to write children’s and young adult literature; and teaching the teacher participants to write children’s and young adult literature.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    492.700.81 - Thesis in Teaching Writing

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Online 9/4 - 12/17

    In this final capstone course, students work on defining and expressing their own theories and best practices in teaching writing, while at the same time developing and refining their own writing. Students create and revise an individual portfolio that includes creative or personal writing along with writing about issues, theories and practices in the teaching of writing. Thesis students also create and research a statement of inquiry related to their specific teaching interests and situation. Students refine all these writings during this course, working with other students and independently with the instructor and/or individual project advisors. All eight prior courses must be completed before a student may enroll in Thesis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    490.652.81 - Contemporary American Writers

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    This foundation course surveys issues and trends in recent fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis on the diverse work and methods of American writers publishing today. Students read and discuss contemporary writing and hear from accomplished writers. This core course focuses on developing skills to read as a writer, and it explores the similarities and differences between factual and nonfactual writing, including the roles of truth, accuracy, and reader expectation. This core course is required for all incoming fiction and nonfiction students and usually must be completed before students in those concentrations enroll in a writing workshop.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.654.81 - Fiction Techniques

    Mark Farrington

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    In this foundation course, students explore the elements of fiction, including point of view, plot, character, setting and the forms of short stories and the novel. The course also introduces students to the writing process, the techniques of reading as a writer, and the workshop process. Readings usually include short stories, one or more novels, and books or articles on craft. Writing assignments involve exercises, response writings, and one complete piece, either an original short story or novel chapter. Revisions also may be required. This core course is required for all incoming fiction students as a prerequisite to any workshop. Nonfiction students may take it as an elective, although the program may limit the number of registrants from outside the fiction concentration.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    490.656.81 - Nonfiction Techniques

    Wayne Curtis

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/4 - 12/17

    The intensive reading and writing exercises of this foundation course help students gather information and transform it into clear, creative prose – whether in literary essay and memoir or journalistic forms such as profiles, reviews or opinion. Reporting techniques include interviewing, personal observation, and examining documents. Writing techniques include structure, quotation, detail, word choice, transition and revision. This core course is required for all incoming nonfiction students prior to enrolling in a workshop. Fiction students may consider this course as an elective.

    Technology Fee: $200.00