Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

*Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    491.808.51 - Internship in Science Writing


    Internships are available to select students with advisor approval. Students should submit an internship proposal well in advance. With the advisor’s help, students may develop their own internship where they live, or they may apply for existing internships at publications, companies, agencies or elsewhere. Internships usually are reserved for students who have completed four courses or more. In most cases, an internship counts as an elective.

  • Online Courses

    491.658.81 - Techniques of Science-Medical Writing

    Timothy Wendel

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This core course develops and hones the reporting, creative and explanatory skills demonstrated by the best science-medical writers. The course features writing assignments and exercises in journalistic and literary writing, plus interviewing, ethics and the use of scientific journals and databases. In some cases, students may be able to choose from a range of writing topics, including nature, technology, health, space, biology, medicine, or other scientific issues. Science Writing students should complete this course before enrolling in any writing workshop. Departmental approval and a writing sample required for students not enrolled in the Science Writing Program.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    491.673.81 - Science-Medical Writing Workshop

    Eric Niiler

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    In a writing workshop, students receive professional guidance in translating complex scientific, medical, or technological knowledge and research into graceful, lucid prose. Students submit individual essays or articles, or parts of a larger work in progress. Writing submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor, then revised. Students are encouraged but not required to take this course from different instructors. (The three section numbers designate the academic term in which the workshop is offered. Students earn workshop credit by taking any section number multiple times, or by combining any sections.) Prerequisite: 491.658

    Technology fee: $200.00

    491.697.81 - The Literature of Science

    David Taylor

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    In this reading elective, students analyze current and classic books, magazine articles, and newspaper series to discover how the best science, medical, nature, and environmental writers create compelling, entertaining, factual literature. Craft topics include structure, pace, sources, content, explanatory writing, and clear, lyrical language. Assignments may include brief reviews and a team presentation of an assigned book, from such writers as Erik Larson, Atul Gawande, Rachel Carson, John McPhee, James Gleick, Lewis Thomas, Elizabeth Kolbert, or Jonathan Weiner.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    491.750.81 - Contemporary Science-Medical Writing: Creative and Professional Forms

    Nancy Lord

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    This core course provides a broad foundation in the diverse forms and venues encountered in contemporary science writing careers. Students learn elements of classic forms, such as essay, profile, news article, and op-ed, and they explore magazines, institutional publications, literary journals, blogs, speeches, and even museum exhibit text. The course covers the differing goals of various forms and how they might be used in multimedia, social networks, and other digital communication. Guest speakers present real-world expertise, with students engaged in discussion, exercises, and writing assignments. Science writing students needing a stronger foundation should complete this course before enrolling in any writing workshop.

    Technology fee: $200.00

    491.755.81 - Science Personal Essay and Memoir Workshop

    Jamie Zvirzdin

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    In this specialized workshop, students experiment with memoir and the personal essay as distinct forms and as an exploration of the self. Seminal essays are read to clarify students' thoughts and to help them develop their own voice and style in personal science writing. The topics of health, technology, environment, and other realms of science or medicine will be paramount, whether in reported content or within the personal experience, feelings or ideas of the writer. This course provides a workshop credit for science writers. Prerequisite: 491.658

    Technology fee: $200.00

    491.755.82 - Science Personal Essay and Memoir Workshop

    Jamie Zvirzdin

    Online 5/29 - 8/21

    In this specialized workshop, students experiment with memoir and the personal essay as distinct forms and as an exploration of the self. Seminal essays are read to clarify students' thoughts and to help them develop their own voice and style in personal science writing. The topics of health, technology, environment, and other realms of science or medicine will be paramount, whether in reported content or within the personal experience, feelings or ideas of the writer. This course provides a workshop credit for science writers. Prerequisite: 491.658

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International

    491.691.91 - Science Policy, Funding and Politics

    Emily Mullin

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    This Residency course, intended to be onsite in Washington, D.C., explores how science, medicine and technology are affected by politics and practices within government, the private sector and within the fields themselves. Students or program alumni use the evolution of science policy as context for discussion, research, and writing about contemporary issues. Students meet with leaders from Capitol Hill, the White House, and federal agencies, and they visit important sites relevant to science policy.

    Onsite portion of the course runs from June 2 to 9, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact your academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Tuition ($3,251) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($350) + nonrefundable dorm lodging fee ($504). Fees do not include transportation or meal costs. The seminar and lodging fees may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar and lodging fees will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.691.92 - Science Policy, Funding and Politics

    Emily Mullin

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    This Residency course, intended to be onsite in Washington, D.C., explores how science, medicine and technology are affected by politics and practices within government, the private sector and within the fields themselves. Students or program alumni use the evolution of science policy as context for discussion, research, and writing about contemporary issues. Students meet with leaders from Capitol Hill, the White House, and federal agencies, and they visit important sites relevant to science policy.

    Onsite portion of the course runs from June 2 to 9, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact your academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Tuition ($3,251) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($350). Fees do not include transportation, meal, or lodging costs. The seminar fee may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar fee will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.691.93 - Science Policy, Funding and Politics

    Emily Mullin

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    This Residency course, intended to be onsite in Washington, D.C., explores how science, medicine and technology are affected by politics and practices within government, the private sector and within the fields themselves. Students or program alumni use the evolution of science policy as context for discussion, research, and writing about contemporary issues. Students meet with leaders from Capitol Hill, the White House, and federal agencies, and they visit important sites relevant to science policy.

    NON-CREDIT COURSE SECTION. Onsite portion of the course runs from June 2 to 9, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact the academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Non-credit tuition ($1,626) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($350) + dorm lodging fee ($504). Fees do not include transportation or meals. The seminar and lodging fees may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar/lodging fees will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.691.94 - Science Policy, Funding and Politics

    Emily Mullin
    Melody Schreiber

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    This Residency course, intended to be onsite in Washington, D.C., explores how science, medicine and technology are affected by politics and practices within government, the private sector and within the fields themselves. Students or program alumni use the evolution of science policy as context for discussion, research, and writing about contemporary issues. Students meet with leaders from Capitol Hill, the White House, and federal agencies, and they visit important sites relevant to science policy.

    NON-CREDIT COURSE SECTION. Onsite portion of the course runs from June 2 to 9, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact the academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Non-credit tuition ($1,626) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($350). Fees do not include transportation, meal, or lodging costs. The seminar fee may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar fee will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.785.91 - In the Wild: Science Writers Explore Montana’s Wilderness and Wildlife Biology

    Melissa Joyce
    Nathan Rott

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    With its snow-capped mountains, icy trout-filled streams, glaciers, bison, and grizzly bears, Montana is a land of rugged natural beauty. It is also home to a unique set of environmental concerns. Those glaciers are melting. Invasive species threaten native habitats. The range and population of the grizzly are hotly debated. Climate change appears to be increasing the size and intensity of wildfires.

    Students in this residency course will meet with scientists -- wildlife biologists, ecologists, and wildfire management experts -- who use Montana’s lakes, mountains, forests, and animals as their laboratories to explore such issues. The class will take field trips to sites of active research, with possible excursions to a world-class ecology research station on a 30-mile-long lake; a fire science lab where scientists model fire behavior and develop tools for wildfire management; and the Clark and Blackfoot Rivers, site of a Superfund success story and the inspiration for Norman Maclean’s A River Runs Through It.

    During the onsite portion of the course, students will practice reporting skills and gather story ideas, engage in craft discussions and creative writing exercises, and be invited to take part in an open mic. Discussions will explore how writers can explain complex, nuanced environmental issues to broad groups of readers, and how writers can evoke the region’s lyricism in their prose. For inspiration, the class will study works by the many literary greats (Maclean, David Quammen, Rick Bass) who have used Big Sky country as their muse.

    The class will be based at the University of Montana in Missoula, noted for its beautiful campus and as the nation’s premier institution for the study of wildlife biology.

    Onsite portion of the course runs from June 23 to 30, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact your academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Tuition ($3,251) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($450) + nonrefundable dorm lodging fee ($200). Fees do not include transportation or meal costs. The seminar and lodging fees may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar and lodging fees will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.785.92 - In the Wild: Science Writers Explore Montana’s Wilderness and Wildlife Biology

    Melissa Joyce
    Nathan Rott

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    With its snow-capped mountains, icy trout-filled streams, glaciers, bison, and grizzly bears, Montana is a land of rugged natural beauty. It is also home to a unique set of environmental concerns. Those glaciers are melting. Invasive species threaten native habitats. The range and population of the grizzly are hotly debated. Climate change appears to be increasing the size and intensity of wildfires.

    Students in this residency course will meet with scientists -- wildlife biologists, ecologists, and wildfire management experts -- who use Montana’s lakes, mountains, forests, and animals as their laboratories to explore such issues. The class will take field trips to sites of active research, with possible excursions to a world-class ecology research station on a 30-mile-long lake; a fire science lab where scientists model fire behavior and develop tools for wildfire management; and the Clark and Blackfoot Rivers, site of a Superfund success story and the inspiration for Norman Maclean’s A River Runs Through It.

    During the onsite portion of the course, students will practice reporting skills and gather story ideas, engage in craft discussions and creative writing exercises, and be invited to take part in an open mic. Discussions will explore how writers can explain complex, nuanced environmental issues to broad groups of readers, and how writers can evoke the region’s lyricism in their prose. For inspiration, the class will study works by the many literary greats (Maclean, David Quammen, Rick Bass) who have used Big Sky country as their muse.

    The class will be based at the University of Montana in Missoula, noted for its beautiful campus and as the nation’s premier institution for the study of wildlife biology.

    Onsite portion of the course runs from June 23 to 30, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact your academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Tuition ($3,251) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($450). Fees do not include transportation, meal, or lodging costs. The seminar fee may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar fee will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.785.93 - In the Wild: Science Writers Explore Montana’s Wilderness and Wildlife Biology

    Melissa Joyce
    Nathan Rott

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    With its snow-capped mountains, icy trout-filled streams, glaciers, bison, and grizzly bears, Montana is a land of rugged natural beauty. It is also home to a unique set of environmental concerns. Those glaciers are melting. Invasive species threaten native habitats. The range and population of the grizzly are hotly debated. Climate change appears to be increasing the size and intensity of wildfires.

    Students in this residency course will meet with scientists -- wildlife biologists, ecologists, and wildfire management experts -- who use Montana’s lakes, mountains, forests, and animals as their laboratories to explore such issues. The class will take field trips to sites of active research, with possible excursions to a world-class ecology research station on a 30-mile-long lake; a fire science lab where scientists model fire behavior and develop tools for wildfire management; and the Clark and Blackfoot Rivers, site of a Superfund success story and the inspiration for Norman Maclean’s A River Runs Through It.

    During the onsite portion of the course, students will practice reporting skills and gather story ideas, engage in craft discussions and creative writing exercises, and be invited to take part in an open mic. Discussions will explore how writers can explain complex, nuanced environmental issues to broad groups of readers, and how writers can evoke the region’s lyricism in their prose. For inspiration, the class will study works by the many literary greats (Maclean, David Quammen, Rick Bass) who have used Big Sky country as their muse.

    The class will be based at the University of Montana in Missoula, noted for its beautiful campus and as the nation’s premier institution for the study of wildlife biology.

    NON-CREDIT COURSE SECTION. Onsite portion of the course runs from June 23 to 30, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact the academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Non-credit tuition ($1,626) + nonrefundable seminar fee ($450) + nonrefundable dorm lodging fee ($200). Fees do not include transportation or meals. The seminar and lodging fees may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar/lodging fees will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.

    491.785.94 - In the Wild: Science Writers Explore Montana’s Wilderness and Wildlife Biology

    Melissa Joyce
    Nathan Rott

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 5/29 - 8/21

    With its snow-capped mountains, icy trout-filled streams, glaciers, bison, and grizzly bears, Montana is a land of rugged natural beauty. It is also home to a unique set of environmental concerns. Those glaciers are melting. Invasive species threaten native habitats. The range and population of the grizzly are hotly debated. Climate change appears to be increasing the size and intensity of wildfires.

    Students in this residency course will meet with scientists -- wildlife biologists, ecologists, and wildfire management experts -- who use Montana’s lakes, mountains, forests, and animals as their laboratories to explore such issues. The class will take field trips to sites of active research, with possible excursions to a world-class ecology research station on a 30-mile-long lake; a fire science lab where scientists model fire behavior and develop tools for wildfire management; and the Clark and Blackfoot Rivers, site of a Superfund success story and the inspiration for Norman Maclean’s A River Runs Through It.

    During the onsite portion of the course, students will practice reporting skills and gather story ideas, engage in craft discussions and creative writing exercises, and be invited to take part in an open mic. Discussions will explore how writers can explain complex, nuanced environmental issues to broad groups of readers, and how writers can evoke the region’s lyricism in their prose. For inspiration, the class will study works by the many literary greats (Maclean, David Quammen, Rick Bass) who have used Big Sky country as their muse.

    The class will be based at the University of Montana in Missoula, noted for its beautiful campus and as the nation’s premier institution for the study of wildlife biology.

    NON-CREDIT COURSE SECTION. Onsite portion of the course runs from June 23 to 30, with some additional coursework required prior to and following the residency. The registration period is February 25 to March 15. Students may register after March 15 if seats remain available. (Contact the academic advisor to check on seat availability.) Costs = Non-credit tuition ($1,626) + a nonrefundable seminar fee ($450). Fees do not include transportation, meal, or lodging costs. The seminar fee may not be refunded after March 15. If you drop the course after March 15, the seminar fee will not be refunded. Tuition is subject to the standard refund schedule for the Summer 2019 semester. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course.