Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

Notice for Writing Program students: Early registration usually guarantees students get the courses they want. Certain courses combine students from two campuses using online tools and video-conferencing equipment. Click for full course descriptions. Is your desired course full? Slots are likely to open up in courses especially in the last week or two before classes begin. For real-time status, please go to SIS. Keep checking back!

  • Homewood Campus

    490.652.06 - Contemporary American Writers

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    This foundation course surveys issues and trends in recent fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis on the diverse work and methods of American writers publishing today. Students read and discuss contemporary writing and hear from accomplished writers. This core course focuses on developing skills to read as a writer, and it explores the similarities and differences between factual and nonfactual writing, including the roles of truth, accuracy, and reader expectation. This core course is required for all incoming fiction and nonfiction students and usually must be completed before students in those concentrations enroll in a writing workshop.

    490.654.06 - Fiction Techniques

    Rion Scott

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/29 - 5/7

    In this foundation course, students explore the elements of fiction, including point of view, plot, character, setting and the forms of short stories and the novel. The course also introduces students to the writing process, the techniques of reading as a writer, and the workshop process. Readings usually include short stories, one or more novels, and books or articles on craft. Writing assignments involve exercises, response writings, and one complete piece, either an original short story or novel chapter. Revisions also may be required. This core course is required for all incoming fiction students as a prerequisite to any workshop. Nonfiction students may take it as an elective, although the program may limit the number of registrants from outside the fiction concentration.

    490.666.01 - Combined Workshop and Readings in Fiction and Nonfiction

    $2918

    Eleanor Williams

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/24 - 5/2

    This course introduces students to innovative readings in both fiction and nonfiction. It is designed for students who wish to stretch the boundaries of their own writing in fiction and nonfiction. In exploring craft in blurred-genre readings, students are encouraged to find ways to introduce new techniques into their own work. Readings may include such writers as Paula Vogel, Susan Griffin, James McBride, Alexandra Marzeno-Lesnevich, Rick Moody, Margaret Atwood, bell hooks, Te-Nehisi Coates, Sam Shepard, Moshin Hamid, Han Kang, Daniyal Mueenduddin, John Tateishi, Yiyun Li, Kathy Acker, and others. This course will follow traditional-workshop format during the last weeks of the class, and readings and exercises will take precedence during the first weeks. This course counts as an elective for either fiction or nonfiction students or it may count as a workshop for either genre.

    490.672.06 - Nonfiction Workshop

    Alexandra Viets

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/1

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles or book chapters. Revisions, exercises and readings also are required. Students may take this general workshop or any specialized workshop to meet the requirement of three workshops for the MA in Writing. This is a dual-campus, videoconference course. Baltimore students meeting in a classroom in Baltimore will be connected by video with students in a D.C. classroom. The instructor will alternate campuses each week.

    490.801.01 - Thesis And Publication

    $2918

    Eleanor Williams

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/29 - 5/7

    This final course is required for all degree candidates in fiction or nonfiction and is offered only in the fall and spring terms. The two course goals are the completion of a successful thesis and an enriching, challenging capstone experience for the entire program. The creative writing thesis will contain portions of a novel or a nonfiction book, and/or a collection of short stories, essays, or articles. We recommend that students select their best work and the work they most want to work on revising during the thesis semester; not all program writing will become part of a thesis. Students taking this course are required to submit a full thesis draft early in the course; the author spends the term working one-on-one with a thesis advisor to revise this draft. In addition, thesis students meet as a class with the thesis class instructor for certain weeks during the term. During those class sessions, students engage in forward-looking discussions on the writing life, participate in a program-capping roundtable discussion, and rehearse and conduct a public reading. Prerequisite: All other required and elective courses. Students may take a second course during their thesis term with the program director’s permission; such a course must be in addition to program requirements. Students enrolling in this course must submit a Thesis Planning Form at least 30 days in advance of the course start date. For more information about the thesis course and process, see the Writing Program website under Program Resources. Thesis Planning Form, link: http://advanced.jhu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Writing_ThesisPlanningForm_August2014.pdf

  • Washington DC Center

    490.652.56 - Contemporary American Writers

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    This foundation course surveys issues and trends in recent fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis on the diverse work and methods of American writers publishing today. Students read and discuss contemporary writing and hear from accomplished writers. This core course focuses on developing skills to read as a writer, and it explores the similarities and differences between factual and nonfactual writing, including the roles of truth, accuracy, and reader expectation. This core course is required for all incoming fiction and nonfiction students and usually must be completed before students in those concentrations enroll in a writing workshop.

    490.654.56 - Fiction Techniques

    Rion Scott

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/29 - 5/7

    In this foundation course, students explore the elements of fiction, including point of view, plot, character, setting and the forms of short stories and the novel. The course also introduces students to the writing process, the techniques of reading as a writer, and the workshop process. Readings usually include short stories, one or more novels, and books or articles on craft. Writing assignments involve exercises, response writings, and one complete piece, either an original short story or novel chapter. Revisions also may be required. This core course is required for all incoming fiction students as a prerequisite to any workshop. Nonfiction students may take it as an elective, although the program may limit the number of registrants from outside the fiction concentration.

    490.662.51 - Fiction Workshop

    $2918

    Margaret Meyers

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/1

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students’ writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors, if possible. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master’s degree. The 660-1-2 sequential numbering of workshops relates only to the three annual academic terms and does not indicate cumulative coursework.

    490.672.56 - Nonfiction Workshop

    Alexandra Viets

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/1

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles or book chapters. Revisions, exercises and readings also are required. Students may take this general workshop or any specialized workshop to meet the requirement of three workshops for the MA in Writing. This is a dual-campus, videoconference course. Baltimore students meeting in a classroom in Baltimore will be connected by video with students in a D.C. classroom. The instructor will alternate campuses each week.

    490.801.51 - Thesis And Publication

    $2918

    Edward Perlman

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    This final course is required for all degree candidates in fiction or nonfiction and is offered only in the fall and spring terms. The two course goals are the completion of a successful thesis and an enriching, challenging capstone experience for the entire program. The creative writing thesis will contain portions of a novel or a nonfiction book, and/or a collection of short stories, essays, or articles. We recommend that students select their best work and the work they most want to work on revising during the thesis semester; not all program writing will become part of a thesis. Students taking this course are required to submit a full thesis draft early in the course; the author spends the term working one-on-one with a thesis advisor to revise this draft. In addition, thesis students meet as a class with the thesis class instructor for certain weeks during the term. During those class sessions, students engage in forward-looking discussions on the writing life, participate in a program-capping roundtable discussion, and rehearse and conduct a public reading. Prerequisite: All other required and elective courses. Students may take a second course during their thesis term with the program director’s permission; such a course must be in addition to program requirements. Students enrolling in this course must submit a Thesis Planning Form at least 30 days in advance of the course start date. For more information about the thesis course and process, see the Writing Program website under Program Resources. Thesis Planning Form, link: http://advanced.jhu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Writing_ThesisPlanningForm_August2014.pdf

  • Online Courses

    490.765.81 - Writing Children's Books

    $2918

    Scott Nash

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Children have an insatiable appetite and need for stories. The books we create for them opens their minds to new ideas that are cherished and remembered forever. Writing for this audience is soulful, complex and deeply satisfying. This fully online course introduces stories for picture books, middle grade chapter books and young adult novels and challenges participants to write their own through discussion, “sketching” ideas and story development.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a fully online class, run asynchronously; there will be no scheduled meetings, either face to face or online, that students need to attend.

    490.766.81 - Completing the Novel

    $2918

    Timothy Wendel

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Many writers begin novels, but far fewer finish them, let alone have the manuscripts fully ready for a publisher’s consideration. In this new fully online class, JHU writer-in-residence Tim Wendel helps students move forward with their works. The class will focus on writing, revising, selling novels in general, as well as some workshop components. The “point of no return,” effective set pieces, quality dialogue and utilizing lessons from film and other art forms are a few of the class topics. Wendel is the author of 13 published books, including a pair of full-length novels, two children’s books and a novella.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a fully online class, run asynchronously; there will be no scheduled meetings, either face to face or online, that students need to attend.

    490.767.81 - Writing the Nonfiction Book Proposal

    $2918

    Karen Houppert

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This fully online course is designed for writers who have a specific nonfiction book project in mind and are looking to secure an agent or publisher based on the well-drafted proposal. Students can be working on a book based on reporting, a memoir, or a collection of essays but they should register for the class only if they already have an idea for a book. Over the course of the semester, students will draft, revise, and refine a 15-page proposal, will develop a chapter outline, and will write a sample chapter or two. Based on feedback from the instructor and fellow students, each writer will complete the course with a polished proposal based on publishing industry standards.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a fully online class, run asynchronously; there will be no scheduled meetings, either face to face or online, that students need to attend.