Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: We currently are not accepting applications to the online MA in Science Writing from students who reside in Alabama, Arkansas, or Kansas. Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs.

  • Homewood Campus

    490.660.01 - Fiction Workshop

    $2806

    Susan Muaddi-Darraj

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/2 - 8/18

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students' writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master's degree. (See Writing the Novel Workshop).

    490.670.06 - Nonfiction Workshop

    $2806

    Karen Houppert

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:00; 6/2 - 8/18

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles, or book chapters; revisions are required. Reading and writing exercises also may be required. Students may take this workshop up to three times to meet the workshop requirement for a master's degree, although specialized workshops also meet that requirement.

    490.681.06 - The Craft of Poetry: An Introduction for Fiction and Nonfiction Writers

    $2806

    Edward Perlman

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/3 - 8/19

    This revised elective course helps writers of Fiction and Nonfiction apply the techniques and benefits of poetry to their writing. Through reading, discussion, and writing, students will be exposed to broad lessons that free verse and formal poems offer in their careful attention to language, rhythm, theme, and other tenets of poetic craft. This course engages those with experience in poetry, as well as those new to the field. As part of this course, students will write and workshop poems with their classmates. This onsite course also may involve some online interactivity.

    Connects with DC section by live video; instructor alternates locations.

    490.702.06 - Readings in Global Fact and Fiction

    $2806

    William Black

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/1 - 8/17

    This elective course presents intensive readings in fiction and nonfiction from around the world. By discussing both fact and fiction, students learn how different cultures, values, and histories create differing literature. Readings will include a sampling from at least three continents, with specific texts announced in advance for each section. Fiction and nonfiction students earn elective credit in this course, which focuses on craft analysis and discussion but also may involve student and team presentations and a final project of creative or analytical writing. This course combines the content of the previous International Nonfiction and 20th Century World Literature.

    Connects by live video with DC section; instructor alternates locations.

  • Washington DC Center

    490.660.51 - Fiction Workshop

    $2806

    Eleanor Williams

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/4 - 8/20

    Fiction Workshops concentrate on intensive writing and revision, with some required reading. As members of a general workshop, students submit short stories or novel chapters to their instructor and peers for critiques. Typically, two or three stories or chapters are submitted during a semester; revisions are usually required. Workshop participants also submit detailed critiques of their fellow students' writing. We recommend, but do not require, that students take at least one general workshop before progressing to more specialized workshops, and we urge students to take workshops from different instructors. Students may take Fiction Workshop up to three times, although specialized workshops also can count toward the requirement of three workshops for a master's degree. (See Writing the Novel Workshop).

    490.670.56 - Nonfiction Workshop

    $2806

    Karen Houppert

    Tuesday 6:00 - 9:00; 6/2 - 8/18

    These general workshops give students extensive experience in writing and revising their factual work, regardless of topic or form. Submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor. Students typically submit two to four essays, articles, or book chapters; revisions are required. Reading and writing exercises also may be required. Students may take this workshop up to three times to meet the workshop requirement for a master's degree, although specialized workshops also meet that requirement.

    490.681.56 - The Craft of Poetry: An Introduction for Fiction and Nonfiction Writers

    $2806

    Edward Perlman

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/3 - 8/19

    This revised elective course helps writers of Fiction and Nonfiction apply the techniques and benefits of poetry to their writing. Through reading, discussion, and writing, students will be exposed to broad lessons that free verse and formal poems offer in their careful attention to language, rhythm, theme, and other tenets of poetic craft. This course engages those with experience in poetry, as well as those new to the field. As part of this course, students will write and workshop poems with their classmates. This onsite course also may involve some online interactivity.

    Connects by live video with Baltimore section; instructor alternates locations.

    490.702.56 - Readings in Global Fact and Fiction

    $2806

    William Black

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/1 - 8/17

    This elective course presents intensive readings in fiction and nonfiction from around the world. By discussing both fact and fiction, students learn how different cultures, values, and histories create differing literature. Readings will include a sampling from at least three continents, with specific texts announced in advance for each section. Fiction and nonfiction students earn elective credit in this course, which focuses on craft analysis and discussion but also may involve student and team presentations and a final project of creative or analytical writing. This course combines the content of the previous International Nonfiction and 20th Century World Literature.

    Connects by live video with Baltimore section; instructor alternates locations.

  • Online Courses

    490.658.81 - Techniques of Science-Medical Writing

    $2806

    Laura McClellan

    Online 6/1 - 8/22

    This core course develops and hones the reporting, creative, and explanatory skills demonstrated by the best science-medical writers. The course features writing assignments and exercises in journalistic and literary writing, plus interviewing, ethics, and the use of scientific journals and databases. In some cases, students may be able to choose from a range of writing topics, including nature, technology, health, space, biology, medicine, or other technical or scientific issues. Science Writing students should complete this course before enrolling in any writing workshop. Enrollment is encouraged by other students interested in this growing professional and creative field.

    Technology fee: $150

    490.673.81 - Science-Medical Writing Workshop

    $2806

    Nancy Lord

    Online 6/1 - 8/22

    In a writing workshop, students receive professional guidance in translating complex scientific or medical knowledge and research into graceful, lucid prose. Students submit individual essays or articles, or parts of a larger work in progress. Writing submissions are critiqued by peers as well as by the instructor, then revised. Students are encouraged but not required to take this course from different instructors. (The three section numbers designate the term in which the workshop is offered. Students earn workshop credit by taking any section number multiple times, or by combining any sections.)

    Technology fee: $150

    490.752.81 - Advanced Reporting & Writing in Science

    $2806

    Ronnie

    Online 6/1 - 8/22

    This course continues to build skills in writing and reporting about science, medicine, or technology. This elective course expands into more advanced techniques and also expands knowledge of longer or more sophisticated forms such as magazine essays, narrative nonfiction, and investigative reporting. Students will engage in reporting and writing exercises, which may be discussed in group workshops.

    Technology fee: $150

  • Off-Site or International

    490.753.91 - Nature, Place, and the Environment: A Mountain Immersion in Shenandoah National Park

    $2806

    Susan Eisenfeld
    David Everett

    The quiet wilderness of Virginia’s famous Blue Ridge Mountains provides the source material for this weeklong program for science and nature writers. From our base at Skyland Resort, at the highest point on Skyline Drive, we will explore our writing voices, the latest conservation and environmental issues, and a panorama of mountain forests, streams, and meadows. Students and alumni of the Science Writing Programs at Hopkins receive enrollment priority for this course. Some activities will enrich texture and context for writers who connect to nature through memoir, personal essay, or a special sense of place. For those seeking timely, in-depth news or magazine stories, other activities will focus on how scientists and policy leaders approach regional, national, and global issues such as amphibian decline, invasive species, and climate change. Hiking, horseback riding, and other opportunities will inspire those pursuing adventure-travel writing. In addition to writing exercises and science/nature briefings, this course may include nature walks, day/night hikes, birding outings, field excursions, yoga, guided meditation, fireside storytelling, faculty/student readings, film screenings, and a regular “Storytime” happy hour to discuss writing projects. This June 7-13 course, part of the 2015 Hopkins Conference on Craft, will involve some advance reading assignments. The course satisfies the Residency requirement for the Hopkins MA in Science Writing Program and counts as a full graduate elective course in the MA in Writing Program. This course will have separate sections and fees for graduate credit and non-credit attendance.

    Full Graduate Credit section. Requires $275 fee. Meets June 7-13 in Shenandoah National Park. Special registration policies apply. See http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/writing/the-experience/hopkins-conference-craft-2015/

    490.753.92 - Nature, Place, and the Environment: A Mountain Immersion in Shenandoah National Park

    $2806

    Susan Eisenfeld
    David Everett

    The quiet wilderness of Virginia’s famous Blue Ridge Mountains provides the source material for this weeklong program for science and nature writers. From our base at Skyland Resort, at the highest point on Skyline Drive, we will explore our writing voices, the latest conservation and environmental issues, and a panorama of mountain forests, streams, and meadows. Students and alumni of the Science Writing Programs at Hopkins receive enrollment priority for this course. Some activities will enrich texture and context for writers who connect to nature through memoir, personal essay, or a special sense of place. For those seeking timely, in-depth news or magazine stories, other activities will focus on how scientists and policy leaders approach regional, national, and global issues such as amphibian decline, invasive species, and climate change. Hiking, horseback riding, and other opportunities will inspire those pursuing adventure-travel writing. In addition to writing exercises and science/nature briefings, this course may include nature walks, day/night hikes, birding outings, field excursions, yoga, guided meditation, fireside storytelling, faculty/student readings, film screenings, and a regular “Storytime” happy hour to discuss writing projects. This June 7-13 course, part of the 2015 Hopkins Conference on Craft, will involve some advance reading assignments. The course satisfies the Residency requirement for the Hopkins MA in Science Writing Program and counts as a full graduate elective course in the MA in Writing Program. This course will have separate sections and fees for graduate credit and non-credit attendance.

    Non-credit section. Requires $150 fee. Meets June 7-13 in Shenandoah National Park. Special registration policies apply. See http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/writing/the-experience/hopkins-conference-craft-2015/

    490.786.91 - Reading Appalachia: Narratives of America’s Eastern Valleys and Mountains

    $2806

    David Everett

    Based in world-renowned Shenandoah National Park, this special, one-week reading course focuses on Fiction and Nonfiction inspired by or set in the famous, beautiful mountain chain that binds the historical and cultural narrative of the Eastern United States. The June 7-13 course, part of the 2015 Hopkins Conference on Craft, features discussion and analysis of essays, short stories, books, and other works relating to Appalachia. All major reading should be completed in advance, with the week spent exploring the craft behind it. While this course is not a writing workshop, participants will have ample opportunities to write and, optionally, share their work in a conference reading. The course includes six full days and some evenings that include indoor/outdoor class discussion, writing exercises, hikes, film screenings, fireside storytelling, author visits, and nature lectures – some of them with participants in other conference sections. Reading Appalachia counts as a full elective course in the Hopkins MA in Writing Program. This course will have separate sections and fees for graduate credit and non-credit attendance.

    Full Graduate Credit Section. Requires $275 fee. Meets June 7-13 in Shenandoah National Park. Special registration policies apply. See http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/writing/the-experience/hopkins-conference-craft-2015/

    490.786.92 - Reading Appalachia: Narratives of America’s Eastern Valleys and Mountains

    $2806

    David Everett

    Based in world-renowned Shenandoah National Park, this special, one-week reading course focuses on Fiction and Nonfiction inspired by or set in the famous, beautiful mountain chain that binds the historical and cultural narrative of the Eastern United States. The June 7-13 course, part of the 2015 Hopkins Conference on Craft, features discussion and analysis of essays, short stories, books, and other works relating to Appalachia. All major reading should be completed in advance, with the week spent exploring the craft behind it. While this course is not a writing workshop, participants will have ample opportunities to write and, optionally, share their work in a conference reading. The course includes six full days and some evenings that include indoor/outdoor class discussion, writing exercises, hikes, film screenings, fireside storytelling, author visits, and nature lectures – some of them with participants in other conference sections. Reading Appalachia counts as a full elective course in the Hopkins MA in Writing Program. This course will have separate sections and fees for graduate credit and non-credit attendance.

    Non-credit section. Requires $150 fee. Meets June 7-13 in Shenandoah National Park. Special registration policies apply. See http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/writing/the-experience/hopkins-conference-craft-2015/