Course Schedule

To view Center for Advanced Governmental Studies Spring 2017 Schedule, click here.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)
SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Public Management courses. _

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    John Gans

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/16 - 8/15

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3783

    Leila Austin

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 7/4 - 8/15
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/29 - 8/10

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.614.51 - Government and Social Media

    $3783

    Matthew Laslo

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/10 - 6/28

    Web note: This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications

    470.632.51 - Defense Policy

    $3783

    Robert Haffa

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/3 - 8/14
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/28 - 8/9

    This course describes the principal challenges facing the making of American Defense Policy and explains previous and current policies declared and practiced to meet them. The course is designed to inform students on the most pressing defense issues confronting the United States, and to present them a framework for defense policy analysis. It emphasizes understanding those defense policies, analyzing them, and considering and weighing alternative approaches to achieving national objectives of deterrence and defense. The course fosters an understanding of the array of U.S. military capabilities providing plausible responses to the use of military power in support of U.S. foreign policy objectives. It examines those policies in the areas of nuclear, conventional, and irregular forces, and weighs alternatives in shaping the size and structure of those forces to meet national objectives.

    470.638.51 - Negotiating as a Leadership Skill

    $3783

    Michael Siegel

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/4 - 8/15
    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/29 - 8/10

    Conflict is part of organizational life. People in public sector agencies and nonprofit and for-profit organizations disagree over the meaning of regulations, the use of financial resources, office space, leave time, and many other issues. Managers must have the ability to diagnose disputes and to negotiate effectively to resolve conflicts. This course provides the theoretical background and conceptual framework needed for successful negotiation and mediation. Through presentations and discussions students become familiar with the tools necessary for conflict resolution in their agencies and organizations. Analysis of a party's interests, identification of the necessary style, awareness of communication skills, and planning and feedback are part of the process of becoming an accomplished negotiator.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.653.51 - Russian National Security Policy

    $3783

    Donald Jensen

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/10 - 6/28

    Russia plays a key role in most international issues and openly campaigns to realign the international system away from what it sees as American domination. This course considers the substance and process of Russian national security policy. It acquaints students with the main instruments and mechanisms available to Russian leaders to advance the country’s national interests and key policy priorities. The course considers how Russia formulates and conducts its national security policy, the history that informs it, the political culture that sustain it, the ideas and interests that drive it, and the people and institutions responsible for it. The course addresses Russia’s role in key global and regional issues and its relations with major powers. It places special emphasis on the wars in Ukraine and Syria, Russian concepts of information war, and on Russian military reform.

    470.673.51 - Data Visualization

    $3783

    Christopher Given

    Thursday 6:15 - 8:45; 5/11 - 8/10

    This course instructs students in various visualization techniques and software. Students will learn how to: (1) ask interesting questions about politics, (2) identify data that can be used to answer those questions, (3) collect, clean and document the data, (4) explore and analyze the data with statistical and graphical techniques, (5) create compelling, informative and accurate visualizations and (6) present these visualizations to educated audiences. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Michael Vlahos

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/10 - 6/28

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.713.51 - Resisting Tyranny: Strategic Nonviolent Conflict

    $3783

    Maciej Bartkowski

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 7/3 - 8/14
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/28 - 8/9

    War practitioners, policy makers, and security studies scholars study asymmetric warfare to understand why poorly armed insurgents effectively resist and even defeat technologically advanced and materially stronger armies. This course studies a perfect asymmetry in nonviolent warfare where unarmed ordinary people are able to effectively challenge and eventually defeat a fully armed, resource-rich regimes. In fact, historically, nonviolent movements have been twice as effective against violent regimes as armed insurgencies. This course will consider skills of organized populations in inter-state and intra-state conflicts, including anti-dictatorship, anti-occupation, anti-corruption, anti-violence struggles and analyze how disciplined civilians use nonviolent strategies and tactics to galvanize large and diverse participation, place their violent opponents in dilemma, make repression backfire and cause defections among adversaries' pillars of support.

    470.722.51 - Intelligence and War

    $3783

    Aris Pappas

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/10 - 6/28

    Intelligence and War will examine the use and misuse of intelligence in the warning of, preparation for, and conduct of war. It will highlight its endemic nature, and its applicability to prevailing in as well as preventing armed conflict. The evolution of intelligence capabilities will be reviewed, and its current status and relevance examined.

    470.748.51 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3783

    Mark Stout

    Monday 5:45 - 8:05; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:05; 5/10 - 6/28

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3783

    Christine Parthemore

    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 5/10 - 6/28

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.790.51 - Strategic Performance Management

    $3783

    Geoffery Seaver

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/15 - 8/14

    470.804.51 - Research & Thesis III: Global Security Studies

    $3783

    Sarah Clark

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/11 - 8/10

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only after they have completed all other 11 courses required for the degree; although under certain circumstances, they may take their last elective along with this course, with the permission of their advisor. 470.804 Research and Thesis is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    470.830.51 - Practicum in Government & Politics

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 5/10 - 8/15

    One of the great strengths of the Government Program is that it brings theory and practice together, and recognizes that it is often from work experience that students gather useful and practical insights and information that can be applied to academic work. This course is designed for students who have an internship or who work in a field that will allow them to use that work experience to conduct research that may be applied to their theses. Permission of instructor is required.

    Only by permission of the instructor may a student register for Practicum.

    470.850.51 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/10 - 6/28
    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/15 - 7/3

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    470.851.51 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/10 - 8/9

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as, measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Please make sure that new title shows in the system i.e. Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    470.853.51 - Research & Thesis II: Global Security Studies

    $3783

    Jacob Straus

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/11 - 8/10

    In this course, students will work closely with the instructor to complete the second paper of the thesis portfolio and to make substantial headway on the third paper of the portfolio as well. Students must pass Research and Thesis I before enrolling in this course. Students may enroll in 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods instead of Research and Thesis II with the permission of the instructor.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Matthew Eckel

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/16 - 8/15

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $500

    Paul Weinstein

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/10 - 8/15

    Non-credit; required for those who have completed all of their course work and have taken the Capstone course, but have not yet completed their Capstone paper.

  • Online Courses

    470.302.81 - Introduction to Graduate Work in Government

    $3783

    Blake Ethridge

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course is an introduction to graduate work and will not count toward your degree, but is designed to help students maximize their performance and excel in graduate studies. The course will combine class work with one-on-one advising and tutoring. The course will cover such topics as research, writing, citation, argument, using evidence, study habits, and managing a graduate-level workload. Teacher and student will meet at the beginning of the semester to assess areas of greatest need and tailor the course to meet them.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 A required non-credit class for provisionally admitted students; an elective for all others that will count towards an elective.

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course is an introduction to government and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.606.81 - U.S. Security in a Disordered World

    $3783

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides an overview of the manifold challenges and opportunities for United States security in the current disordered and changing world. It aims to help students assess why events occur and what policies are developed in response. In that endeavor, the course has three major objectives. First, the course will review the major perspectives on, and debates about, U.S. security and the institutions through which policy is made and executed. Second, the course will review some U.S. security issues through scholarly, policy, political, and historical lenses. Third, the course will help students write for both policy and academic audiences. This course is not open to students who have had 470.606 American National Security.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.615.81 - Speechwriting: Theory and Practice

    $3783

    Ken Masugi

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    The theory and practice of speechwriting are the focus of our study of the great political speeches of all time and especially those of the American political tradition. We will examine the content, structure, and purpose of high rhetoric ranging from Pericles to Solzhenitsyn, from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Franklin D. Roosevelt to contemporary politicians. Based on their knowledge of the best models, students will draft and deliver their own speeches.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.625.81 - Resource Development and Marketing in Nonprofits

    $3783

    Karen Osborne

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    The goal of this course is to prepare future nonprofit leaders and board members with the international resource development and marketing fundamentals that help every nonprofit thrive. The course focuses on how to create and nurture an organizational culture where everyone on the staff and board understands, embraces and acts on his or her role in developing strategic relationships with funders, potential funders, and media professionals. You will gain an understanding of the process, the metrics that drive the process, and the milestone markers that lead to success. You will explore how to develop a board and/or cadre of volunteers who give generously, share expertise freely, connect you to the right government officials and media leaders, and invite others to join them. Data driven decision making and all aspects of fund development, marketing and communications will be woven throughout the course. Led by an internationally recognized practitioner, consultant and master teacher, the course will use scenarios, discussion, social media, audio and video clips so that you will walk away with the knowledge you need to secure private and government funding, and social capital as a CEO, senior staff member, board chair or member, and the confidence to do it all well. Core course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management Formerly Resource Development and Marketing in Nonprofits

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.631.81 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    $3783

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policy making. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policy making. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas – including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts towards the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.643.81 - Text as Data

    $3783

    Christopher Lucas

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Politics produces textual data at an ever-increasing rate. From blog posts to judicial opinions, text contains answers to pressing questions in social science. However, statistical analysis of text is not straightforward. In this course, students will develop the tools necessary to collect, analyze, and visualize large amounts of text. The course begins with a hands-on introduction to the programming concepts necessary to collect and process textual data, then proceeds to the key statistical concepts in machine learning and statistics used to analyze text as data. Throughout the course, students develop a research project that culminates in the online display of results from a large-scale textual analysis. NOTE: At a minimum, students in this course should have some programming experience with R and must have a basic understanding of statistical concepts like distributions, model-based inference, and uncertainty. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fees: $175.00 NOTE: At a minimum, students in this course should have some programming experience with R and must have a basic understanding of statistical concepts like distributions, model-based inference, and uncertainty. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.667.81 - Machine Learning and Neural Networks

    $3783

    Mahmoud Lababidi

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Machine learning and, more broadly, artificial intelligence, has recently had a series of unprecedented successes in performing tasks such as image recognition and autonomously playing video games at a higher level of accuracy and performance than humans. These successes are driven by accelerated developments in machine learning, notably neural networks. This course will cover a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.671.81 - Risk Management in Government Agencies

    $3783

    William Spinard

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    The demand for robust and resilient risk management practices is increasing in the public sector as organizations continue to struggle with explicitly integrating risks into their executive decision making processes. OMB’s recent revision of A-123 places additional pressure on this imperative. The objective of this course is to introduce students to fundamental risk management and measurement practices and demonstrate their relevance to the government sector. It will help students understand risk management principles and practices and how they might apply to their organization. The goal is to give students a comprehensive view of both the risk management processes and some of the key measurement tools for understanding and mitigating operational, credit, market and enterprise risks exposures.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods. If you've taken a different statistics course, check with the instructor. Important Note: This course requires that students use Excel (on their personal computer) and purchase @Risk software ($50).

    470.676.81 - From al-Qaeda to Islamic State: Understanding the Roots of the Global Jihad Movement

    $3783

    Shiraz Maher

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    No topic has captured the public imagination of late quite so dramatically as the specter of global jihadism. While much has been said about the way jihadists behave, their ideology remains poorly understood. This course aims to help students explore the intellectual development of jihadist ideology, focusing on how conflict has shaped Islamic theology and law. We go from the movement’s origins in the mountains of the Hindu Kush to the jihadist insurgencies of the 1990s and the 9/11 wars. What emerges is the story of a pragmatic but resilient warrior doctrine that often struggles , as so many utopian ideologies do, to consolidate the idealism of theory with the reality of practice.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.679.81 - Armed Social Movements: Terrorism Insurgency and Crime

    $3783

    Hans Ucko

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Drawing on the social movement literature, this course examines the emergence of irregular armed groups and their decisions to use violence. It explains how social movements turnviolent, how violence dictates their nature, and what this nature can tell us in terms of group strengths and weaknesses. It provides the students with the analytical tools needed to distinguish between terrorism, insurgency, and crime – by focusing and understanding group strategies, behavior, and capabilities. Students will thus be familiarized with the theory on armed group formation and evolution – but the course goes further, by counterposing such theory to the complexities of practice through the consideration of key case studies. The course ends with an overview of state strategies intended to counter a wide variety of threats. Particular attention is paid to the notion of operational art and lines of effort to underline the potential and meaning of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.684.81 - Legislative Language and Policymaking

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course examines the process of drafting legislation and the consequences of legislative language in the implementation and adjudication of federal policies. Focusing on the various stages of the legislative process, this course considers the expert and political sources of the legislative language in the U.S. Congress and the importance of language in coalition-building for policy passage. Examining the interactions of Congress with the other branches of government, the course also considers how presidents, the executive branch, and the judiciary interpret statutory language.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Web note: This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.685.81 - The Challenge of Change: Innovation in Military Affairs

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Change is perennial in national security and military affairs, but knowing how, why, and when to embrace change is both difficult and vital. Strategies and tactics may be outdated, new ideas may be resisted, and science and technology continue to change our world faster than we can optimize. The paradox deepens with context: innovation in peacetime has one logic while innovation in war has another. This course unravels the nature of change in military affairs through four themes: ideas, materials, human capital and structure, and, appreciation of the enemy. The course explores these themes through a series of case studies from around the world. Topics include civilian development/military application of science and technology; learning from failure and success (including from other nations); institutional reactions to change; procurement and the role of industry; and, the impact and limitations of individual “champions” of change.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.697.81 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Formerly Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods. Core course for MA in Public Management and may be taken in place of 470.852 Research and Thesis II with permission from the instructor. Core course for Government Analytics.) Students will learn how to construct and evaluate multivariate regression models, which are useful for answering causal questions about issues related to political behavior, policy and governance. Topics include multivariate regression, interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity and logistic and probit regression. The focus of the course is on using statistical methods in an applied manner. The course will also introduce students to Stata, a widely-used statistical software program. Recommended prerequisite: Political Analysis and Statistics.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Recommended Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Formerly Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods. Core course for MA in Public Management and may be taken in place of 470.852 Research and Thesis II with permission from the instructor. Core course for Government Analytics.) Students will learn how to construct and evaluate multivariate regression models, which are useful for answering causal questions about issues related to political behavior, policy and governance. Topics include multivariate regression, interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity and logistic and probit regression. The focus of the course is on using statistical methods in an applied manner. The course will also introduce students to Stata, a widely-used statistical software program. Recommended prerequisite: Political Analysis and Statistics.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.721.81 - Comparative Federalism: The United States and the European Union

    $3783

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Federalism the division of power and sovereignty between a central authority and local governments has emerged as one of the most important themes of contemporary Western politics in both the United States and Europe. For the United States the division of power between the Federal and State governments lies at the very heart of the American Constitution. At the same time disputes over the precise balance of Federal and State power has been a major fault line in American politics since Federalists and anti-Federalists at the time of the founding. For Europe the destruction of two World Wars showed the destructive side of nationalism and acted as an impetus to leverage Europe’s common history and cultural inheritance to forge a supranational political and economic union dedicated to peace and prosperity. Since the end of the Cold War and the Treaty of Maastricht the process of European integration has speeded up rapidly resulting in a common European currency as well as common legal and political institutions. At the same time concerns about the perceived loss of sovereignty, national identity, and democratic accountability have led in some places to backlashes against Brussels and resurgent nationalism. There is also the broader question of the European Union’s goals and identity is it principally an economic union or is it a super-state in the making? In this course we will explore Federalism in its institutional, legal, philosophical, and historical aspects in both America and Europe.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    In the United States, the flourishing of nonprofit initiative is intertwined with our country's legal and tax systems, the needs of the nation in wartime, interest groups addressing social and economic inequities, the federal role in social service delivery and foreign aid, rising wealth, and perceived threats to internal security. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Many of the principles recommended as "best practice" can be applied to nongovernmental organizations in other countries as well.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.751.81 - Politics and Security in the MIddle East

    $3783

    Bryan Gibson

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course will cover key topics relating to Middle East politics and security, with a particular emphasis on emerging dynamics of the region in the wake of the Arab Uprisings. The course will explore several key themes such as the rise of sectarianism, evolving trends in Islamist militancy, and the status of social movements and identity politics in the Middle East. It will also address longstanding issues such as the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Iran's role in the region. Finally, the course will also examine U.S. policy responses to the changing political and security landscape of the Middle East. Classes will alternate between broader, theme-related sessions and country-specific cases.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.758.81 - Data-Driven Campaigns and Elections

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course examines the ways in which campaigns increasingly rely on data and analytics to inform their voter mobilization and persuasion strategies. Campaigns are leveraging massive databases that contain information on voters’ spending, political engagement and media-consumption habits. Using this information, campaigns make decisions about which television/print ad slots to purchase and which voters to target in get-out-the-vote efforts.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.763.81 - Database Management Systems

    $3783

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides students with a strong foundation in database architecture and database management systems. The principles and methodologies of database design, and techniques for database application development are evaluated. The current trends in modern database technologies such as Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), NoSQL Databases Cloud Databases, and Graph Databases are examined.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.764.81 - Survey Methodology

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course is a comprehensive examination of all aspects of designing questionnaires, conducting survey research, and analyzing survey data. The class will cover question construction, measurement, sampling, weighting, response quality, scale and index construction, IRB, ethics, integrity and quality control, modes of data collection (including telephone, mail, face to face and focus groups), post collection processing and quantitative analysis of data (including chi-square and ANOVA), as well as report writing basics.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.774.81 - Nonprofit Governance & Executive Leadership

    $3783

    Charles Dambach

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course covers the basic responsibilities of nonprofit boards according to law and custom and includes ethical concepts, public attitudes, and contemporary legislative and regulatory issues. The course explores theories of effective governance and executive leadership that have had wide influence, and how ethical considerations relate to perceptions of excellence and shape the way staff and volunteer leaders manage people and money. There will be opportunities to compare the role of boards in US nonprofit groups with those in other countries, with a special emphasis on countries whose legal systems provide for significant state control of nongovernmental initiative. This is a required course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.795.81 - The Constitution and National Security

    $3783

    Margaret Williams

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course exams the interpretation of constitutional powers and rights under conditions of heightened national security. We will consider the Supreme Court's role in constitutional interpretation, and the balance of power among the three branches. The course will also examine the tension between security and liberty during a time of war. Topics covered during this semester will include military tribunals, unitary theory of the executive, congressional oversight, war-making power, intelligence authorities, and treatment of detainees.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3783

    Nancy Hall

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Elective for Research Administration) The basic tools for financial management and analysis are covered in this course with a focus on those aspects that will: 1) provide needed skills to students planning careers in public and nonprofit organizations and 2) provide those working for government with tools to evaluate nonprofit and private sector organizations with which they interact. Topics include legal and audit requirements for financial reporting, disclosure laws, and state and federal registration requirements. The course will also address interpreting financial statements and assessing and managing for financial health. These basic management tools are necessary not only for basic financial management but also for creating the financial component of a Request For Proposal (RFP) from a US funding source and for those striving for organizational sustainability through "social enterprise" or earned income ventures in general.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3783

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only after they have completed all other 11 courses required for the degree; although for financial aid reasons, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3783

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    (Core course for the MA in Government and MA in Global Security Studies. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis I: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.862.81 - Capstone Seminar: Development and Execution of a Data Analysis Project

    $3783

    Holly Brasher

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Technology Fees: $175.00 This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics program. Students should take this course in their last (or next-to-last) term of the Government Analytics program.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $3783

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    non-credit; required (beginning Summer 2007) for those who have completed all of their course work including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    Technology Fees: $175.00 For those who have completed all of their course work including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. You'll work with the instructor to submit your work and complete your thesis.

    470.901.81 - Performance Analytics: Tools and Techniques

    Carter Hewgley
    Andrew Nicklin

    Online 5/1 - 8/15

    This course will enable participants to: 1) launch a sustainable open data program that increases transparency and public engagement; and 2) leverage data to improve performance-based management with an emphasis on budget, operational, and policy decision making. During the course, participants will receive feedback on the strategies they developed.

    This is an executive education course