Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)
SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Public Management courses. _

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Homewood Campus

    470.820.01 - Independent Study

    $3897

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 5/30 - 8/22

    Summer 2018 – meetings times to be set b/t student and faculty.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    Christina Lai

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/5 - 8/21

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.638.51 - Negotiating as a Leadership Skill

    $3897

    Michael Siegel

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/31 - 8/16

    Conflict is part of organizational life. People in public sector agencies and nonprofit and for-profit organizations disagree over the meaning of regulations, the use of financial resources, office space, leave time, and many other issues. Managers must have the ability to diagnose disputes and to negotiate effectively to resolve conflicts. This course provides the theoretical background and conceptual framework needed for successful negotiation and mediation. Through presentations and discussions students become familiar with the tools necessary for conflict resolution in their agencies and organizations. Analysis of a party's interests, identification of the necessary style, awareness of communication skills, and planning and feedback are part of the process of becoming an accomplished negotiator.

    470.653.51 - Russian National Security Policy

    $3897

    Donald Jensen

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/30 - 7/11
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/4 - 7/9

    Russia plays a key role in most international issues and openly campaigns to realign the international system away from what it sees as American domination. This course considers the substance and process of Russian national security policy. It acquaints students with the main instruments and mechanisms available to Russian leaders to advance the country’s national interests and key policy priorities. The course considers how Russia formulates and conducts its national security policy, the history that informs it, the political culture that sustain it, the ideas and interests that drive it, and the people and institutions responsible for it. The course addresses Russia’s role in key global and regional issues and its relations with major powers. It places special emphasis on the wars in Ukraine and Syria, Russian concepts of information war, and on Russian military reform.

    470.668.51 - The Politics and Process of American Foreign Policy

    $3897

    John Gans

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/4 - 8/20
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/30 - 7/11

    Overuse is not the only problem with the maxim that American “politics stop at the water’s edge.” The slogan has simply never been true. American foreign policy has always been a result not just of the crises and opportunities the nation has faced but its unique politics and policy processes. American national interests are determined through the democratic processes established by the Constitution and other legislation and affected by the politics that drive the nation’s elections, its conversations and its foreign policies. These politics and processes have been remarkably consistent since the founding even as the nation’s interests have grown significantly. A better understanding of both the politics and processes of American foreign policy will help students appreciate how the country’s policies are made today and will be made in the future.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3897

    Michael Vlahos

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/5 - 8/21
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/31 - 8/16

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.722.51 - Defense Intelligence in War and Peace

    $3897


    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/16 - 8/20
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/18 - 8/22

    “Intelligence and War” will examine the use and misuse of intelligence in the warning of, preparation for, and conduct of war. It will highlight its endemic nature, and its applicability to prevailing in as well as preventing armed conflict. The evolution of intelligence capabilities will be reviewed, and its current status and relevance examined.

    470.732.51 - Communications and Congress

    $3897

    Matthew Laslo

    Monday 6:00 - 9:10; 6/4 - 7/11
    Wednesday 6:00 - 9:10; 5/30 - 7/11

    We're living in a capital city the founders wouldn't even recognize. In recent years the Capitol itself has been outfitted with state of the art green screens, fiber optic cables, minutely pixelated cameras and new, polished studios where politicians of all stripes roll out proposals that are instantly disseminated to their supporters on multiple mediums, including in email blasts begging for campaign contributions. After a brief exploration of the history of political communications, the course will quickly pivot into a real-time examination and training session for surviving - even thriving - in the contemporary world of communications. The course will instill in students the dire need to stay focused on good policy. While students will leave equipped with the tools that will enable them to thrive in this hyper-partisan atmosphere, the hope of the course is to help Hopkins students stand out as policy focused experts in this soundbite-dominated era. The instructor is a veteran congressional reporter who is offering to bring students enrolled in his course with him to attend press conferences and/or hearings, to witness key votes from the press galleries overlooking the House and Senate floors and to study how reporters and politicians interact inside the marble halls of the Capitol. Students will be offered a front row seat to witness the contemporary congressional communications apparatus in person (some students may not be able to take time off work to accompany the professor to the Capitol, which is fine because they can catch up on those events later on C-SPAN, though students are encouraged to shadow him on the Hill for at least one day during the semester, though some may opt for spending more than one day with him). The main focus is on training students to be communications experts in this new, digital world. Students will have one main project during the semester that will require them to develop their own messaging campaign simultaneously on multiple m

    This is an updated course that counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.748.51 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3897

    Mark Stout

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/4 - 7/9
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/30 - 7/11

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    This is a blended class: During the week of June 10th, class will be held online rather than onsite.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3897

    Christine Parthemore

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/17 - 8/21
    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/12 - 8/16

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.786.51 - Weapons of War: The Technology and Uses of Weapons

    $3897

    Duncan Brown

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/12 - 8/21
    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/12 - 8/16

    Modern warfare utilizes advanced weapons systems. This course will examine various weapon systems ranging from artillery, cruise missiles, aircraft, aircraft launched weapons, ships, submarines and unmanned systems. We will also examine strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. In the examination we will look at capabilities, concepts of operation, and issues surrounding their procurement and use. The course will also involve students working through a crisis scenario utilizing various weapon systems. No pre-existing technical knowledge is assumed nor is any required.

    470.800.56 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3897

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/5 - 8/21

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    This is a videoconference class. Students who live in the DC area are encouraged to attend in person at the DC campus on Tuesdays at 6:00 EST. Students who do not live in the DC area or cannot attend in person will participate in the course via video conference each Tuesday at 6:00 EST.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Matthew Eckel

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 5/30 - 7/9
    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/4 - 7/11

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    This is a core course for students in Graduate Program in Public Management. This course meets one of the Research and Study Process course requirements for the Graduate Program in Global Security Studies.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $3897

    Jennifer Bachner

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 6/3 - 8/19

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    This course is only for Government Analytics and Public Management students who have not yet completed their capstone (but have taken their capstone seminar course already).

  • Online Courses

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for MA in Government Students.

    470.602.82 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    John Gans

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.604.81 - Social Media and The American Presidency

    $3897

    Jenna Brayton

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course will investigate the impact that digital technology has had on the institution of the American presidency. The adoption of the internet in the 21st century, both as a tool and as an information distribution mechanism, has had an astonishing impact on the Office of the Presidency. This course is designed to have students operationalize theoretical concepts and apply them to real world situations. Students will engage with scholarly research, analytical arguments, and real-time case studies on the effective use of social media in all aspects of the presidency: campaigning, public debate, electoral processes, and democracy more broadly. In that spirit, we will examine how the first president of the social media age, Taught by a member of the first White House Office of Digital Strategy, the primary objective of this course is to provide students will the tools and skills to be informed consumers of political social media, as well as to equip them to participate in the political digital conversation.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communication.

    470.605.81 - Global Political Economy

    $3897

    Charles Larkin

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    o 470.605 Global Political Economy (3 credits) In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.606.81 - U.S. Security in a Disordered World

    $3897

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides an overview of the manifold challenges and opportunities for United States security in the current disordered and changing world. It aims to help students assess why events occur and what policies are developed in response. In that endeavor, the course has three major objectives. First, the course will review the major perspectives on, and debates about, U.S. security and the institutions through which policy is made and executed. Second, the course will review some U.S. security issues through scholarly, policy, political, and historical lenses. Third, the course will help students write for both policy and academic audiences. This course is not open to students who have had 470.606 American National Security.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.608.81 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 5/30 - 8/15

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for students in the Graduate Program in Public Management.

    470.615.81 - Speechwriting: Theory and Practice

    $3897

    Ken Masugi

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    The theory and practice of speechwriting are the focus of our study of the great political speeches of all time and especially those of the American political tradition. We will examine the content, structure, and purpose of high rhetoric ranging from Pericles to Solzhenitsyn, from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Franklin D. Roosevelt to contemporary politicians. Based on their knowledge of the best models, students will draft and deliver their own speeches.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration

    470.625.81 - Resource Development and Marketing in Nonprofits

    $3897

    Karen Osborne

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    The goal of this course is to prepare future nonprofit leaders and board members with the international resource development and marketing fundamentals that help every nonprofit thrive. The course focuses on how to create and nurture an organizational culture where everyone on the staff and board understands, embraces, and acts on his or her role in developing strategic relationships with funders, potential funders, and media professionals. You will gain an understanding of the process, the metrics that drive the process, and the milestone markers that lead to success. You will explore how to develop a board and/or cadre of volunteers who give generously, share expertise freely, connect you to the right government officials and media leaders, and invite others to join them. Data-driven decision-making and all aspects of fund development, marketing, and communications will be woven throughout the course. Led by an internationally recognized practitioner, consultant, and master teacher, the course will use scenarios, discussion, social media, audio, and video clips so that you will walk away with the knowledge you need to secure private and government funding and social capital as a CEO, senior staff member, board chair, or member, and the confidence to do it all well. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.631.81 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    $3897

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for students in the Public Management program.

    470.631.82 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    $3897

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    This is a core course for the MA in Public Management.

    470.632.81 - Security Issues in South Asia

    $3897

    Syed Ali

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    The South Asian region, with its complex historical context, a large and diverse population, and contested national borders, especially between nuclearized countries, poses some of the toughest security challenges facing the world. This course highlights salient security challenges in South Asia, and draws out their implications for U.S. strategic interests. It examines the sources and implications of the rivalry between nuclearized India and Pakistan, and how it fuels Sino-Indian security competition. Attention is drawn to the sources of militancy in India, and to the threats to international and regional security arising from the conflict in Afghanistan. The Sri Lankan Tamil Tiger insurgency and its eventual defeat in 2009 are also discussed, alongside the rising Islamist militancy threats in Bangladeshi, and the history of Maoist insurgency in Nepal. Finally, some of the climate-based threats to which no South Asian country is immune will also be discussed.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.661.81 - Political Debates and the US Constitution

    $3897

    Ryan Emenaker

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course explores the political struggles that emerge from the U.S. constitutional system. During the course, we will read contemporary and classic cases in U.S. constitutional law in light of constitutional and political theory. Course discussions will focus on the law as well as the related policy, political, and societal implications of constitutional interpretation. Through paying particular attention to recent decisions and issues before the Court, the course will explore the roles and powers of the branches of federal government, separation of powers, federalism, and the commerce clause. It will also cover individual rights, due process, equal protection, and religious freedoms.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a new course offering that counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.673.81 - Data Visualization

    $3897

    Cathryn Rabinowitz

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course instructs students in various visualization techniques and software. Students will learn how to: (1) ask interesting questions about politics, (2) identify data that can be used to answer those questions, (3) collect, clean and document the data, (4) explore and analyze the data with statistical and graphical techniques, (5) create compelling, informative and accurate visualizations and (6) present these visualizations to educated audiences. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis; Students must have access to a computer that supports Chrome.

    470.676.81 - From al-Qaeda to Islamic State: Understanding the Roots of the Global Jihad Movement

    $3897

    Shiraz Maher

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    No topic has captured the public imagination of late quite so dramatically as the specter of global jihadism. While much has been said about the way jihadists behave, their ideology remains poorly understood. This course aims to help students explore the intellectual development of jihadist ideology, focusing on how conflict has shaped Islamic theology and law. We go from the movement’s origins in the mountains of the Hindu Kush to the jihadist insurgencies of the 1990s and the 9/11 wars. What emerges is the story of a pragmatic but resilient warrior doctrine that often struggles, as so many utopian ideologies do, to consolidate the idealism of theory with the reality of practice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.679.81 - Armed Social Movements: Terrorism Insurgency and Crime

    $3897

    Hans Ucko

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Drawing on the social movement literature, this course examines the emergence of irregular armed groups and their decisions to use violence. It explains how social movements turnviolent, how violence dictates their nature, and what this nature can tell us in terms of group strengths and weaknesses. It provides the students with the analytical tools needed to distinguish between terrorism, insurgency, and crime – by focusing and understanding group strategies, behavior, and capabilities. Students will thus be familiarized with the theory on armed group formation and evolution – but the course goes further, by counterposing such theory to the complexities of practice through the consideration of key case studies. The course ends with an overview of state strategies intended to counter a wide variety of threats. Particular attention is paid to the notion of operational art and lines of effort to underline the potential and meaning of counterterrorism and counterinsurgency.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.684.81 - Legislative Language and Policymaking

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course examines the process of drafting legislation and the consequences of legislative language in the implementation and adjudication of federal policies. Focusing on the various stages of the legislative process, this course considers the expert and political sources of the legislative language in the U.S. Congress and the importance of language in coalition-building for policy passage. Examining the interactions of Congress with the other branches of government, the course also considers how presidents, the executive branch, and the judiciary interpret statutory language.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration

    470.697.81 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    $3897

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.700.81 - Cloud Computing in the Public Sector

    $3897

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides insights into how to utilize shared cloud computing resources through a service provider. These resources can be storage space, software as a service, or compute servers. This is a hands-on course in which students will access a variety of cloud services and work with different cloud providers such as Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon. Students will set up virtual servers, work with cloud file storage, learn about a variety of cloud collaboration options, and much more. This practical course will help students make the transition to working in the cloud from any device, anywhere, anytime. All areas of the public sector, such as education, healthcare and law enforcement, increasingly use cloud computing both to deliver information to clients and share information within and across agencies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.703.81 - Urban Data Analytics

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This class applies data analytic skills to the urban context, analyzing urban problems and datasets. Students will develop the statistical skills to complete data-driven analytical projects using data from city agencies, federal census data, and other sources, including NGOs that work with cities. We will examine a variety of data sets and research projects, both historical and contemporary, which examine urban problems from a quantitative perspective. Over the course of the term, each student will work on a real-world urban data problem, developing the project from start to finish, including identifying the issue, developing the research project, gathering data, and analyzing it, culminating in a research paper. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: 175.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 407.709 Quantitative Methods. This course will use require students to use Stata IC.

    470.719.81 - Technical Collection of Intelligence

    $3897

    Robert Clark

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course covers the application of remote sensing technology to intelligence issues to include geospatial intelligence (GEOINT), measurements and signatures intelligence (MASINT) and signals intelligence (SIGINT). It examines the tradeoffs associated with the use of different imaging, radar, and passive radiofrequency sensors and collection platforms. The methods for processing, exploiting and analyzing raw intelligence data collected by different types of sensors are discussed. The final segment of the course investigates the management issues associated with remote sensing in intelligence.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.723.81 - Western Political and Constitutional Thought

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Many of the ideas which shape today´s world- democracy, liberalism, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, nationalism - have their roots in a "great conversation" (Robert Hutchins) that spans some 25 centuries from ancient Greece until today. The conversation motivating the Western tradition has included a set of perennial questions such as: Who ought to rule - and how do we decide? What is the purpose of politics? What is the best form of constitution? What makes political authority legitimate? What is political justice? What is citizenship? This course is intended as a broad survey of some the most influential political thinkers in the intellectual tradition of Europe and America. Among the many who will be examined are : Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Voltaire, Baron de Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Edmund Burke, Friedrich Nietzsche, G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, Leo Strauss, and Hannah Arendt.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3897

    Karin Orr

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course can count as a core requirement for the Public Management degree. See website for specifics.

    470.743.81 - Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

    $3897

    Nicole Alioto

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Many government agencies engage in data mining to detect unforeseen patterns and advanced analytics, such as classification techniques, to predict future outcomes. In this course, students will utilize IBM SPSS Modeler to investigate patterns and derive predictions in areas such as fraud, healthcare, fundraising, human resources and others. In addition, students will learn to build segmentation models using clustering techniques in an applied manner. Integration with other statistical tools and visualization options will be discussed. Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3897

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.756.81 - Understanding Modern War

    $3897

    Stephen Grenier

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course examines the phenomenon of modern warfare through both a theoretical and historical lens. It will provide insight into the definitions, origins, objectives, strategies, and tactics of modern conflict. Throughout the course you will analyze recent and ongoing conventional, irregular, and hybrid wars and understand what caused them, how they were conducted, and why they ended the way they did. Through a combination of lecture and online discussion, students will analyze these conflicts from a variety of perspectives to include state security and military forces, insurgents, criminals, and terrorists. Prerequisite: AS.470.692 Military Strategy & National Policy.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.769.81 - Data Science for Public Policy

    Holly Brasher

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.774.81 - Nonprofit Governance & Executive Leadership

    $3897

    Charles Dambach

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course advances our understanding of self-governing nonprofit organizations by focusing on the responsibilities, expectations, challenges, and opportunities of nonprofit boards and their executive leadership. This course covers the basic responsibilities of nonprofit boards according to law, custom, and best practices, and it includes ethical concepts, public attitudes, and contemporary legislative and regulatory issues. The course explores theories of effective governance and executive leadership that have had wide influence, and how ethical considerations relate to perceptions of excellence and shape the way staff and volunteer leaders manage people and money. In the discussions, there will be opportunities to compare the role of boards in US nonprofit groups with those in other countries. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.779.81 - Computational Modeling for Political and Policy Analysis

    $3897

    Kyle Joyce

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course will introduce computational modeling and demonstrate how computational modeling can be used to understand political and policy analysis. Specifically, the course will focus on agent-based modeling, which is a commonly-used approach to build computer models to better understand proposed policies and political behavior. Agent-based models consist of a number of diverse "agents,'’ which can be individuals, groups, firms, states, etc. These agents behave according to behavioral rules determined by the researcher. The interactions with each other and their environment at the micro-level can produce emergent patterns at the macro-level. These models have been used to understand a diverse range of policy issues including voting behavior, international conflict, segregation, health policy, economic markets, ethnic conflict, and a variety of other policy issues. The course will consist of two parts: First, we will examine the theoretical perspective of computational modeling. Second, you will be introduced to a software platform that is commonly used to develop computational, and, in particular agent-based modeling.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.792.81 - Social Science in National Security and Intelligence

    $3897

    Todd Helmus

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course examines the role of social science in national security decision making and intelligence. The course lectures, readings and classroom discussion are intended to help students understand the ambivalent relationship between social scientists on the one hand and intelligence personnel and national security policy makers on the other. It also considers the opportunities and limitations in the ways social science could contribute to policy making and how social science has contributed to key national issues. The course will help the student become a savvy consumer of social science.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.795.81 - The Constitution and National Security

    $3897

    Margaret Williams

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course exams the interpretation of constitutional powers and rights under conditions of heightened national security. We will consider the Supreme Court's role in constitutional interpretation, and the balance of power among the three branches. The course will also examine the tension between security and liberty during a time of war. Topics covered during this semester will include military tribunals, unitary theory of the executive, congressional oversight, war-making power, intelligence authorities, and treatment of detainees.

    Technology Fe: $175.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3897

    Leana Bowman

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course can count as a core requirement for the Public Management degree.

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3897

    Jacob Straus

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.850.82 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3897


    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.851.81 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3897

    Kathleen Reedy

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.852.82 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897


    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.855.81 - Research Study Seminar

    $3897

    Sarah Clark

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    Holly Brasher

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course is only for students in the Master's in Government Analytics program. Students in the program should take this course in their last or next-to-last term.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $3897

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.901.81 - Getting Started with Performance Analytics

    $3897

    Jennifer Grams
    Eric Reese
    Lena Geraghty
    Moses Pounds

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course will enable participants to: 1) launch a sustainable open data program that increases transparency and public engagement; and 2) leverage data to improve performance-based management with an emphasis on budget, operational, and policy decision making. During the course, participants will receive feedback on the strategies they developed.

    This is a non-credit course. AAP students should not enroll in this course.

    470.902.81 - Sports Impact Leadership Certificate

    $3897


    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

    470.904.81 - Community Engagement: Tools and Techniques for Making Meaningful Connections

    $3897

    Jennifer Grams
    Eric Reese
    Laurenel McCann

    Online 6/27 - 8/22

    “Community engagement” is prized as both a key incentive for and desired outcome of open data and digital government services. However, all too often, the skills, strategies, and activities necessary to develop meaningful community engagement are deprioritized at best or go unrecognized at worst, leaving civil servants scrambling to activate constituents with little time, resources, or capacity. This online course, developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University, is a bootcamp designed to introduce and level up essential engagement planning, outreach, and organizing skills, and apply them to a real-world initiative of your choosing. Drawing on best practices in multiple sectors, we’ll delve into the art and science of mobilizing diverse communities, crafting lasting partnerships, and telling the story of our work. Although framed around data and digital initiatives, the skills and strategies learned here can be broadly applied to other government programs as well. Experience working for state or local government strongly recommended, but not required for this course.

    This is a non-credit course. AAP students should not enroll in this course.

    470.905.81 - Foundations of Applied Analytics in Government

    $3897

    Eric Reese
    Matthew Pazoles
    Jennifer Grams

    Online 6/24 - 8/22

    This course will provide an introduction to advanced data analytical techniques and how they are being used in cities to improve the quality of life for residents. Participants will gain practical experience in scoping data science problems, applying statistical analyses, and communicating results.

    This is a non-credit course offering. AAP students should not enroll in this course.

  • Off-Site or International

    470.648.91 - European Security: Russian Challenge, Western Response

    $3897

    Donald Jensen
    Mark Stout

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/16 - 8/22
    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/17 - 8/22
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/18 - 8/22
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/12 - 8/22
    Friday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/13 - 8/22

    Russia has returned to an assertive foreign policy with military interventions in Ukraine and Syria and intrusion into the internal affairs of Western democracies. Two tools of Russian power demand close study: the armed forces and the state’s capacity for information warfare. Western planners and policy makers are preparing for the potential threat of Russian military attack and also for the actual threat of ongoing subversion, destabilization and “active measures.” Russia, meanwhile, continues to present itself as being under threat from the West, and is mobilizing to address that “threat.” Russia’s security initiatives, even if it views or presents them as defensive measures, could have severe consequences for its neighbors. This course will seek to answer three questions: What kind of threat does Russia pose? How adequate has been the Western response? What are the prospects for the continent’s security if the Putin system itself may be in decline? It will seek to answer these questions through seminar sessions in Washington, readings, discussions and visits with security officials and experts in key European capitals Brussels, Kiev, and Tallinn.

    This course has a course fee of $1700 of which $700 is non-refundable. If you drop this course prior to March 26, you will be refunded only the tuition plus the refundable portion of the fee. If you drop this course after March 26, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop. This course needs 10 students to run. (REGISTRATION RUNS: January 25 at 10am to March 26 at 11:59pm).

    470.707.91 - International Security and Intelligence

    $3897


    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/30 - 8/22

    This course offers a unique opportunity to work with leading British and American practitioners and academics from the security and intelligence worlds. It considers the claims of state secrecy, the threat of nuclear proliferation, of cyberattack, terrorism, the problems generated by the demand for regional security, and the security challenges of revolutions and governing diversity. Intelligence collection, analysis of the product, and its dissemination to customers remain at the core of the intelligence cycle. Counterintelligence and covert action play more opaque but still vital roles at the heart of the nation state. Understanding these perspectives, what intelligence can achieve, but also its limitations, are major themes. This four-week course is offered at Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.

    470.755.91 - Sustainable Cities in Germany: Lessons for the United States

    $3897

    Dale Medearis
    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/8 - 5/25
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/9 - 5/25
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 5/25
    Friday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/11 - 5/25
    Saturday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/12 - 5/25

    This course addresses two important, but overlooked global urban phenomena – the development of world-class urban sustainability plans in Berlin and the Stuttgart region and their suitable transfer and application to cities in the U.S. This class will be designed to expose the student to the evolution and performance of renewable energy, public transit, water infrastructure, workforce training and social inclusion innovations - in these metropolitan regions and the ways that they may (or not) be considered suitable for adoption in the US. By the end of this course the student will have developed an appreciation for the pioneering urban sustainability programs of Berlin and Stuttgart and the phenomena of cross-national policy transfer to the U.S.

    Registration for the course will open on November 15th and close on February 1st. Students will register for this course in SIS. Payment of Tuition and Course Fee is due at the time of registration (Tuition $3,783 + Course Fee $500). If a student decides to drop this course, $500 of the tuition is non-refundable and also the course fee is non-refundable, regardless of a student’s payment method (financial aid, employer assistance, tuition remission, etc.). Please note: This course does not follow the regular tuition refund schedule and ALL tuition and fees for the course are NON-REFUNDABLE after the course closes on February 1st. SPECIAL NOTE: STUDENTS IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND POLICY PROGRAM MAY USE THIS COURSE TO FULFILL THEIR RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT. The course needs 10 people to run and closes at 15. Refunds will be made if there are not enough people register to run the course. Registration will be on a first come, first served basis. Estimates for Travel and Accommodations in Germany for the duration of the course are $1,550. In addition, students are responsible for their roundtrip transportation to Berlin. DO NOT PURCHASE TRAVEL OR MAKE OTHER INVESTMENTS IN YOUR TRIP UNTIL YOU HEAR FROM DR. HILL THAT THERE ARE ENOUGH PARTICIPANTS TO RUN THE COURSE. This will be determined by February 2nd or possibly earlier.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Rhey Solomon

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    425.602.81 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3858

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/30 - 8/22

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    $3782

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/30 - 8/22

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    472.600.81 - Introduction to Geospatial Intelligence

    $3897

    John O'Connor

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides an overview of the four disciplines that have merged to create the new discipline of geospatial intelligence and an introduction to the content of the program. The history of imagery analysis and digital cartography, the art of turning observation into insight and communicating those insights to non-experts, the science behind the sensors and platforms, and the mathematics behind imagery collection sampling strategies. The course studies the issues, technologies, and changes over the past 60 years that have developed into geospatial intelligence, and it will introduce the students to the opportunities and challenges of geospatial intelligence as it has shaped intelligence collection, analysis, reporting, and policy decisions. The outcomes of success in this profession have created new industries, and the course will also review the effects of commercial imagery, smallsats, non-governmental collection, and remotely piloted sensors. Students will be introduced to the concepts that will be covered through the remainder of the Master’s program through the Capstone exercise.

    Technology Fee: $175.00