Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)
SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Public Management courses. _

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    Michael Newell

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/23 - 5/1

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3897

    Marco Zambotti

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/23 - 5/1

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.631.51 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    $3897

    Marc Goldwein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/29 - 5/7

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    This is a core course for students in the MA in Public Management Program.

    470.638.51 - Negotiating as a Leadership Skill

    $3897

    Michael Siegel

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:25; 1/24 - 5/2

    Conflict is part of organizational life. People in public sector agencies and nonprofit and for-profit organizations disagree over the meaning of regulations, the use of financial resources, office space, leave time, and many other issues. Managers must have the ability to diagnose disputes and to negotiate effectively to resolve conflicts. This course provides the theoretical background and conceptual framework needed for successful negotiation and mediation. Through presentations and discussions students become familiar with the tools necessary for conflict resolution in their agencies and organizations. Analysis of a party's interests, identification of the necessary style, awareness of communication skills, and planning and feedback are part of the process of becoming an accomplished negotiator.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.657.51 - Energy, Security, and Defense

    $3897

    Oliver Fritz

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:25; 1/24 - 5/2

    This course is a seminar-based overview of the role of energy in national security. Using a range of U.S. and non-U.S. case studies, students will review the roles of energy in grand strategy, the role of energy in conflict, and, finally, as a logistical enabler of military operations.

    470.660.51 - Program Evaluation

    $3897

    John Milatzo

    Tuesday 6:30 - 9:10; 1/29 - 5/7

    Program Evaluation is the systematic use of empirical information to assess and improve the efficacy of public or non-profit programs and policies. Evaluation is increasingly required by funders and policy makers concerned with accountability and efficient use of public or philanthropic resources. In addition, many governments and organizations have built the logic of evaluation into their work through systems of performance management and monitoring.

    This course introduces the student to the literature, theories and approaches to evaluating organizational programs, policies and procedures. Students will acquire a broad perspective on types of program evaluation, including formative and summative evaluation, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Students gain practical experience through exercises and assignments involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, analysis of quantitative and qualitative evaluation data, and development of an evaluation plan to measure impact. In addition, topics such as experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental study designs are introduced in the context of a variety of settings, including schools, welfare agencies, mental health organizations, criminal justice settings, environmental programs, nonprofit organizations, and corporations.

    Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    This course may count as a core course for the M.S. in Government Analytics.

    Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods (or equivalent). This course may count as a core course for the M.S. in Government Analytics.

    470.665.51 - Covert Action and National Security

    $3897

    John Sano

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/24 - 5/2

    Covert action (CA) remains a highly controversial and generally misunderstood element within the Intelligence Community. Title 50 of the United States Code defines Covert Action as: “…an activity or activities of the United States Government to influence political, economic, or military conditions abroad, where it is intended that the role of the United States Government will not be apparent or acknowledged publicly.” Lying somewhere between overt diplomatic initiatives and direct military intervention, CA is often referred to as the “third option” when addressing foreign policy issues that impact on U.S. national security interests. Through selected case studies, we will review the mechanisms by which CA is initiated, managed and executed – determining what CA can and equally important, cannot accomplish. We will also see how CA, as conducted by the CIA, is often used in a dual track program alongside State Department initiatives in an effort to resolve particularly difficult foreign policy dilemmas. CA is not unique to the U.S., and is often employed by other countries as well. Whether Russian “active measures,” or French “direct action,” variants of CA continue to form an integral, albeit highly secretive, element of statecraft.

    470.667.51 - Machine Learning and Neural Networks

    $3897

    Mahmoud Lababidi

    Thursday 6:30 - 9:10; 1/24 - 5/2

    Machine learning and, more broadly, artificial intelligence, has recently had a series of unprecedented successes in performing tasks such as image recognition and autonomously playing video games at a higher level of accuracy and performance than humans. These successes are driven by accelerated developments in machine learning, notably neural networks. This course covers a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis This course will cover a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    IMPORTANT: Students are REQUIRED to bring a laptop to class; the laptop should be a PC or Mac laptop (not chromebook) with 4GB RAM (preferably 8GB) minimum. Please contact the instructor with questions..

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis. IMPORTANT: Students are REQUIRED to bring a laptop to class; the laptop should be a PC or Mac laptop (not chromebook) with 4GB RAM (preferably 8GB) minimum. Please contact the instructor with questions.

    470.672.51 - Evolution of American Intelligence

    $3897

    Michael Warner

    Monday 6:15 - 8:55; 1/28 - 5/6

    This course explores the development of US intelligence system and the ways in which it has influenced (and been influenced by) world events. The goal is to understand how an intelligence system evolves as a result of changes in national strategy, technology, and legal & policy factors. By investigating the US intelligence system, students will develop their analytical skills and increase their understanding of the workings of foreign and security policies. The approach will be historical and topical. The history of US intelligence offers a surprising number of illustrative cases and themes—many of which can now be examined in detail using official records and contrarian views, and can even be compared with analogues across nations and time periods. More-recent events are not as well documented in the public, official record, of course, but an understanding of earlier patterns and activities can provide valid insights on contemporary trends.

    470.678.51 - National Security Leadership

    $3897

    Stephen Duncan

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:55; 1/23 - 5/1

    This course analyzes the civilian and military leadership of the principal departments and agencies of the government which are responsible for the nation's security. Attention will be placed upon the problems with which civilian (senior and mid-level political appointees, Civil Service) and military leaders are currently dealing, the processes through which they are selected and evaluated, culture and competence clashes, the inevitable tension in the civil-military relationship, and efforts to improve professionalism in a rapidly changing security environment. An important objective is to improve the critical thinking skills of the students and to inform them on the political, operational, budgetary, legal, and other factors which influence senior officials in the making of defense/homeland security strategies and policies and on the decision-making methodologies employed.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3897

    Benjamin Runkle

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/23 - 5/1

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    470.695.51 - Proseminar: Essentials of Public and Private Management

    $3897

    Thomas Stanton

    Monday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/7 - 5/6

    (The purpose of the class is to help equip students to operate effectively in both the public and private sectors. The class will cover three major topics: (1) an overview of managing public and private organizations, with special attention to their differing missions, capabilities, and environments; (2) a survey of important relationships between the public and private sectors; and (3) the need for improved coordination between the public and private sectors to achieve important public purposes. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge in the context of the issues discussed. Students will be expected to complete a significant paper on a relevant topic approved by the instructor. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA program)

    This class can serve as a core requirement for students in the MA in Public Management and for students in the Dual MA in Government /MBA program.

    470.711.51 - Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy

    $3897

    Mark Lowenthal

    Monday 5:45 - 8:25; 1/28 - 5/6

    This course examines the role that intelligence plays in the formation of national security policy. The course explores the forces and events that have shaped U.S. intelligence. It examines the steps involved in producing intelligence from requirements through collection, analysis and the actual making of policy. The role of intelligence in the major intelligence issues facing the United States today will be discussed as well. The main text for the course will be Dr. Lowenthal’s book of the same title published by CQ Press which has been called the “best introduction to the role of the U.S. intelligence community in the national security policy-making process.”

    470.744.51 - Trade and Security

    $3897

    Edward Gresser

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/24 - 5/2

    Since World War II, American trade policy has been implemented through agreements with a growing array of foreign governments to encourage global economic integration by lowering barriers to international trade. The course will begin with a look at the foundation of this approach to trade policy at the end of World War II and the relationship the Roosevelt and Truman administrations saw between integration and security policy. It will then introduce students to the American trade regime of the early 21st century and the WTO, and examine the ways the U.S. governments has adapted this regime to regional challenges arising from relationships with Japan, China, and the Muslim world, and to policy issues, like resource dependence, sanctions and export controls. The course will have a midterm exam on America’s trade regime and the concepts that have shaped it, and a final paper, in which students will examine an issue of their choice in depth. (Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.752.51 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3897

    Sarah Beebe

    Monday 5:45 - 8:25; 1/28 - 5/6

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3897

    Christine Parthemore

    Monday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/28 - 5/6

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.785.51 - Nuclear Proliferation and Non-Proliferation

    $3897

    Peter Almquist

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/29 - 5/7

    Since 1945, eight states have tested nuclear weapons, and perhaps two dozen others have started -- and stopped nuclear weapons programs. This course considers why some countries pursue nuclear weapons and why others forgo them, an issue that bedevils both policymakers, who concerned about the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and political scientists, who attempt to explain and predict it. The class will delve into past and present examples, discussing and evaluating theories of why states pursue such weapons, the technologies that make it possible, and the policy tools available to prevent it. We will also draw on the parallel efforts to control chemical weapons, biological weapons, and ballistic missiles.

    470.797.51 - Intelligence to Secure the Homeland and Hometown

    $3897

    Wesley Moy

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/29 - 5/7

    This course provides students with an intellectual foundation for understanding the concepts underpinning homeland security intelligence, as well as an overview of the US national homeland security framework including organization and policies. It examines the underlying intellectual constructs used to frame the comprehension of security issues, intelligence based on those issues and the development of policies and strategies that lead to implementing programs that protect the United States infrastructure and its people from attack. Over the term, students will be challenged to examine the various paradigms that shape homeland security intelligence and critically apply them to contemporary homeland security challenges and examine how well or poorly these paradigms are reflected in current responses, organizations and policies.

    470.800.51 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/29 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Matthew Eckel

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/2 - 5/1

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management .

    470.855.51 - Research Study Seminar

    $3897

    Sarah Clark

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/24 - 5/2

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.860.51 - Capstone for Public Management

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 5/7

    This is the final required course in the MA in Public Management program, and students can only take the capstone course in their final semester and after having completed all the other core requirements (Students graduating in the summer semester must take the course in the preceding spring semester). In the semester prior to taking the capstone course and conducting the project, students identify a project topic. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course. To complete the course, students must write a 30- to 35-page capstone paper.

    This is a core requirement for Public Management students. No other students are permitted to register for this course.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 1/23 - 5/7

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

  • Online Courses

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.602.82 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    John Gans

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.605.81 - Global Political Economy

    $3897

    Charles Larkin

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.612.81 - Bureaucratic Politics

    $3897

    Ken Masugi

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This seminar will examine the political support for bureaucracy, how bureaucracy functions in contemporary government and society, and selected current controversies over the purpose and reach of bureaucracy. How does bureaucracy enhance or frustrate liberal democratic ideals? We will take up case studies involving current political issues, such as civil rights enforcement, the war on terror, the role of regulatory agencies, judicial policymaking, relevant student experiences, and the instructor's own experience in various federal and state agencies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.616.81 - Political Ideas, Strategy, and Policy Implementation

    $3897

    Alvin From
    Alice McKeon

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    It is easy, in this age of reactive 24-hour news, to believe that ideas no longer matter in politics. But ideas are the currency of politics, and are central to both campaigning and governing. What candidates stand for matters, and the best policy is the best politics. This class will discuss the critical role ideas play in our American political system. It will examine how ideas define candidates and governments, shape political strategies, and form campaign communications. But, most importantly, it will discuss how campaigning on ideas leads to successful governing. While compromise and negotiation are often derided as weaknesses in today’s political system, we will examine how these techniques have been used to implement policy ideas and further political strategy. From the practical perspective of the instructor’s own legislative and political experience, the class will take up case studies involving the interplay between politics and ideas in recent history in areas such as budget reform, national security, tax reform, crime prevention, trade, and poverty. Through these case studies, we will look at how and why policy ideas succeeded or failed through the lens of elections, political communications, and their positive impact on the public.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.622.81 - Money and Politics

    $3897

    Richard Skinner

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course considers the historical and contemporary relationship between money and government. In what ways do moneyed interests have distinctive influences on American politics? Does this threaten the vibrancy of our representative democracy? Are recent controversies over campaign finance reform and lobbying reform signs that American government is in trouble? This course is reading, writing, and discussion intensive, and we consider the large academic literature on this subject, as well as the reflections of journalists and political practitioners. Election law and regulations on money in politics are always changing, and so part of the course is designed to give students tools at tracking these developments. The overall goal of the course is to foster an understanding of the money/politics relationship in ways that facilitate the evaluation of American democracy.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications. Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.623.81 - Nonprofit Program Development and Evaluation

    $3897

    Steven Mayer

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Formerly Program Development & Evaluation in Nonprofits.) A major goal of this course is to help students become more proficient in recognizing, evaluating, and encouraging the kinds of benefits or outcomes intended by our society’s variety of nonprofit and public programs. We will examine what needs and opportunities are addressed by four major types of programs: those serving individuals, those serving communities, those serving networks or systems, and those serving other organizations. Evaluating each requires different lenses and different tools; we will explore the role of culture and context in choosing particular approaches to evaluation. A view of programs as interconnected rather than isolated will be encouraged. A second goal is to help students become more proficient in managing an evaluation process: We will explore purposes and uses of evaluation, the essential elements of an evaluation inquiry, and ways to communicate and use evaluation results. We will explore the variety of quantitative and qualitative strategies useful for evaluating progress in an organization’s attainment of its intended outcomes or benefits. Students can expect to become more proficient in discussing issues of nonprofit and public “program effectiveness,” and strategies for improving nonprofit and public program designs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.627.81 - Financial Management & Analysis in the Public Sector

    $3897

    Thanh Nguyen

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course focuses on financial aspects of public sector organizations and institutions. The objectives of this course include helping students (1) learn the basics of public sector accounting and the construction of their financial reports, (2) become more intelligent users of the financial statements of public sector organizations such as sovereign, state, and municipal institutions, and (3) better understand the factors that affect the financial condition and financial performance of such entities.

    More specifically, the course focuses on (1) the financial reporting concepts and standards that are applicable to public sector organizations; (2) ratios and other summary indicators used by analysts to evaluate the financial condition and financial performance of public sector and nonprofit organizations; (3) the analysis and interpretation of financial statements of selected public sector organizations; (4) fundamental finance principles; and 5) basic principles of budget formulation.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management.

    470.633.81 - Transnational Organized Crime: Gangsters of the Global Underworld

    $3897

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Transnational organized crime often is not well understood because crime is most often conceptualized as a domestic legal concern. However, transnational organized crime is more than that. It is crime ordered into complex clandestine networks that operates transnationally with little regard for the borders of states. The gravity of the problem lies not only in the increasing complexity of these organizations, but more importantly, with the serious challenge they pose in their ability to penetrate and operate with relative impunity in several states simultaneously. These illegal enterprises not only threaten aspects of state sovereignty and security that traditionally have been taken for granted, but they prove the permeability of national borders and the vulnerability of state institutions. This course will examine a variety of transnational organized criminal groups, their modus operandi, and their illicit activities. It also will focus on some domestic organized crime groups both to provide a depth of understanding of the operations of organized criminal activity in different countries, as well as to show how international groups can make inroads into domestic markets if they cooperate with local groups.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.645.81 - The Budgetary Process

    $3897

    Joelle Cannon

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The federal budget process is an enormously complex mixture of administrative routines and mechanisms designed to bias decisions, avoid blame, or reduce conflict. This course explores the structures of federal budgeting in terms of its varied goals and in the context of the wider governing process. The course will review the budgetary process in both the executive and congressional branching, as well as the interaction of those two systems. In order to gain understanding of the difficult policy choices and political pressures policymakers face, students will be asked to do a simulation of a budget process within the executive branch. The role of entitlements, scoring issues, and tax policy will be examined in the context of the debate over budget policy. The course will start with a short primer on finance theory. (Recommended elective for MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.651.81 - Corruption and Democratic Governance

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Corruption is ubiquitous. It is a universal phenomenon that has always been around and that can be found almost anywhere. Recent years have seen much focus on the relationship between it and democratic governance. Indeed corruption and politics more generally, are inextricably and universally entwined. In this seminar we will take an in-depth look at the relationship between the two. We will ask: What is Corruption? Is it always the same thing everywhere, or does it vary depending on context or place? Do pork barrel politics and political clientelism count as corruption? What are the implications of corruption? Is it necessarily always a bad thing or can it be beneficial? Is the corruption experienced in developed countries qualitatively different from that in developing ones such that democracy suffers more in developing countries? We will seek to answer these and other questions by taking a critical look at the politics of corruption. We will look at the origins, extent, character and significance of corruption from both a developed and developing country perspective. We will cover various theories relating to corruption as well as look at a number of empirical cases.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.658.81 - Religion and American Political Culture

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The relationship between religion and politics in the American context is one of peculiar complexity in the American context. This course has 3 main objectives: 1) to examine in general terms the role of religion in American public and political life as reflected in the debates concerning the use of religious symbolism and discourse in the public sphere; 2) to analyze how religiously informed moral argument has helped to shape public debate on key issues of public policy including the issues of civil rights, abortion, war and peace, and economic policy; and 3) to provide the necessary historical and philosophical context to help understand the present day intersection of religion and politics, and to see how previous generations of Americans approached similar problems.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.659.81 - Radicalization and Deradicalization in Terror Networks

    $3897

    Shiraz Maher
    Joana Cook

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will explore some of the most contested and controversial aspects in contemporary security studies. There are a number of contentious and wide-ranging debates around ideas like radicalization not least concerning its definition, causes, and effects. This course will also prompt you to consider broader issues, such as whether there is a causal link between extremism and violent extremism? Why do some radicalized individuals to embrace terrorism, when other don’t? And should security officials concern themselves with radicalization, or only with its violent offshoots? This course will unpack many of these debates, exploring academic and theoretical literature surrounding the issues of radicalization, recruitment, and deradicalization in modern terrorist networks. It will focus primarily on cases in Europe and the United States, while also exploring new phenomena such as homegrown, self-starter, and lone wolf terrorism.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.671.81 - Risk Management in the Public Sector

    $3897

    William Spinard

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The demand for robust and resilient risk management practices is increasing in the public sector as organizations continue to struggle with explicitly integrating risks into their executive decision making processes. OMB’s recent revision of A-123 places additional pressure on this imperative. The objective of this course is to introduce students to fundamental risk management and measurement practices and demonstrate their relevance to the government sector. It will help students understand risk management principles and practices and how they might apply to their organization. The goal is to give students a comprehensive view of both the risk management processes and some of the key measurement tools for understanding and mitigating operational, credit, market and enterprise risks exposures.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods. If you’ve taken a different statistics course, check with the instructor prior to enrolling. Important Note: This course requires that students use Excel (on their personal computer) and purchase @Risk software (approximately $50).

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3897

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3897

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.682.81 - Mission Meets Profit: Building a Social Enterprise

    $3897

    Lucyna Jodlowska

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The goal of this course is a comprehensive examination of social enterprises- organizations that, broadly speaking, “apply commercial strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being”. Social enterprises are a relatively new, 21st century phenomenon, and are typically referred to as hybrids of nonprofits and for-profits. While they are similar to nonprofits in that their missions and social and/or environmental objectives drive their very existence, social enterprises can have different structures than traditional 501©3s- some much more complex, legally and otherwise. Throughout the course we will learn about the various types of social enterprises that exist, comparing US models to models operating internationally, and analyze their pros and cons, challenges and opportunities. We will also explore how social enterprises challenge traditional business and nonprofit paradigms, what role social enterprises have come to play in international development, and finally, how to go about developing your own social enterprise. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.684.81 - Legislative Language and Policymaking

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines the process of drafting legislation and the consequences of legislative language in the implementation and adjudication of federal policies. Focusing on the various stages of the legislative process, this course considers the expert and political sources of the legislative language in the U.S. Congress and the importance of language in coalition-building for policy passage. Examining the interactions of Congress with the other branches of government, the course also considers how presidents, the executive branch, and the judiciary interpret statutory language.

    This course counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration. Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3897

    Jason Fritz

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines how states (primarily the United States) and other political entities harness military capabilities to pursue of policy objectives. It exposes students to levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus on the practical implications and unique characteristics of military strategy. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear warfare. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of the various theories, the characteristics of the military capabilities animated by them, and, through discussion and case studies, the strengths and limitations of each.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.694.81 - Big Data Management Systems

    $3897

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces students to big data management systems such as the Hadoop system, MongoDB, Amazon AWS, and Microsoft Azure. The course covers the basics of the Apache Hadoop platform and Hadoop ecosystem; the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS); MapReduce; common big data tools such as Pig (a procedural data processing language for Hadoop parallel computation), Hive (a declarative SQL-like language to handle Hadoop jobs), HBase (the most popular NoSQL database), and YARN. MongoDB is a popular NoSQL database that handles documents in a free schema design, which gives the developer great flexibility to store and use data. We cover aspects of the cloud computing model with respect to virtualization, multitenancy, privacy, security, and cloud data management.

    Prerequisite: 470.763 Database Management Systems

    Technology Requirements: A 64-bit computer with a chip that supports virtualization (set via BIOS) Windows Operating System 7, 8, or 10 At least 8 Gb of Physical RAM Oracle VirtualBox version 4.2 (free) Please be in touch with the instructor with questions about the technology requirements.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.763 Database Management Systems. Technology Requirements: A 64-bit computer with a chip that supports virtualization (set via BIOS) Windows Operating System 7, 8, or 10 At least 8 Gb of Physical RAM Oracle VirtualBox version 4.2 (free) Please be in touch with the instructor with questions about the technology requirements.

    470.696.81 - Ethics and Privacy in Intelligence Operations

    $3897

    Rhea Siers

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will address the ethical dilemmas and privacy issues that challenge intelligence and government decision makers in an increasingly complex operational and technological environment. We will examine basic moral, ethical and privacy considerations from all sides at several key points in intelligence operations from collection to covert action. The course will analyze the evolving nature of privacy concerns worldwide, with an emphasis on the balance between individual rights and national security needs as executed by intelligence agencies. Students will examine the policy implications inherent in seeking to address these issues. The readings will include diverse and opposing viewpoints as well as practicums and simulations to allow debate of the key positions in "real world" situations. Prior enrollment in 406.665 "The Art and Practice of Intelligence" or 470.711 "Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy" is strongly encouraged.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.704.81 - Strategies in Insurgent and Asymmetric Warfare

    $3897

    Stephen Grenier

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This class examines the phenomenon of irregular warfare—of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies in particular—through a historical lens. The course will give you students insight into the origins, objectives, strategies, and tactics of irregular wars, as well as the principles of counterinsurgency theory and practice. Through the course, you will analyze current irregular wars, understand what caused them and whether they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful, and see how they can be combated.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3897

    Leana Bowman

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This class can serve as a core requirement for Public Management students

    470.736.81 - Methods of Policy Analytics

    $3897

    Robert Torongo

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Data analytics are an essential part of program and policy evaluation. Policymakers increasingly rely upon analytics when making critical policy decisions. In this course, students will conduct a variety of policy focused data analyses using R. Students will utilize a variety of descriptive and inferential data analysis techniques to inform the design and execution of a policy. Students will utilize data-driven analysis to produce policy memoranda in a variety of domains relevant to today’s practitioners. A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments.

    A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments. Please contact the instructor with any questions.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 A good understanding of basic economics and statistics, and an understanding of American government institutions and programs, will be necessary for a student to participate effectively in the class discussions and complete the assignments. Please contact the instructor with any questions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.738.81 - Civic Technology and Smart Cities

    $3897

    Holly Brasher

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Civic technology is an emerging field that combines the work of those in and out of government to government innovation. Civic tech initiatives have been used to extend and improve services, increase efficiency, design applications for citizen engagement, and improve communication across a variety of policy domains. Topics covered in the course include open data platforms and policies, algorithms employed in civic tech, and the civic tech organization ecosystem. Students will use R to build dashboards, open data portals, maps, and predictive models. Smart city technology is a distinct but related field that involves the management of city infrastructure and services with the goal of improving the quality of life of citizens through the use of information and communication technology. Topics include smart infrastructure, connected technologies, and sustainability. Students will use information to identify a community need and design an application that addresses the need. Prerequisite: 470.681.81 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.740.81 - Cyber Policy, Strategy, Conflict and Deterrence

    Rhea Siers

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will provide an overview of current issues in the cyber realm, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective. We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. We will analyze the roles of several different types of cyber actors including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector/business responses. This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. A technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.743.81 - Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

    $3897

    Nicole Alioto

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Many government agencies engage in data mining to detect unforeseen patterns and advanced analytics, such as classification techniques, to predict future outcomes. In this course, students will utilize IBM SPSS Modeler to investigate patterns and derive predictions in areas such as fraud, healthcare, fundraising, human resources and others. In addition, students will learn to build segmentation models using clustering techniques in an applied manner. Integration with other statistical tools and visualization options will be discussed. Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    470.747.81 - The FBI and Fusion Centers: Information Sharing in the Post 9/11 World

    Anthony Lang

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines the “fusion” of information gathering and sharing between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the 79 fusion centers in a Post-9/11 World. We will address federal, state, and international law enforcement jurisdictional issues, the balancing of privacy/civil liberties with information collection/dissemination, and overall assistance to state/local authorities during critical incidents. Students will address broad public policy and perception implications inherent in law enforcement activities. Students will also analyze and discuss case studies such as the Las Vegas Concert, the Orlando Night Club, and the San Bernardino shootings to illustrate the need for timely fusion of information between federal and state law enforcement. The readings and videos will include a variety of diverse and opposing viewpoints relative to law enforcement with practicums and simulations to allow debate in “real-world” situations. An important objective is to determine ways to improve upon the current law enforcement landscape and generate possible solutions to ensure seamless and timely information sharing while safeguarding individual rights.

    This is a new course offering that will count towards the Concentration in Security Studies in the MA in Government Program.

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3897

    Gary Keeley

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done particularly from an American-British perspective. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.748.82 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done particularly from an American-British perspective. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.749.81 - Campaigns and Running for Office

    $3897

    Jason Linde

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    You can see yourself now – taking the oath of office, giving speeches, and making critical decisions impacting thousands or millions of people. But how do you get there? This class provides a practical guide for students who are interested in exploring a run for elected office. Students will learn how to assess if and when they are ready to run, which office to run for, and most importantly, develop the critical skills needed as a candidate to wage and win a contested campaign. These skills include writing a campaign plan and budget, hiring staff and consultants, learning how to fundraise, and working with the media. This class dispels the myth that only those independently wealthy can serve in office by giving students a real understanding of what it takes to run and win.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a new course offering and counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.751.81 - Politics and Security in the MIddle East

    $3897

    Bryan Gibson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course will examine U.S. policy responses to the changing political and security landscape of the Middle East. Bringing together historical events, primary sources and secondary literature and contextual analysis, this course will provide the necessary analytical skills required to develop a sophisticated understanding of the current political and security situation in the Middle East. Each module, students will engage key topics in modern Middle Eastern politics and security, including the origins of Islam, Arab nationalism and its rise to prominence, the Arab-Israeli and Palestinian-Israeli conflicts, the internal/external struggles against Western imperialism, the competition among Arab states for regional dominance, the Cold War the Middle East, America’s relations with Iran and Iraq, the oil economy of the Gulf, the challenge minorities pose to the region, the rise of Islamic radicalism, the Arab Spring, and the rise of the Islamic State.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.760.81 - Comparative Intelligence Systems

    $3897

    Mark Stout

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Do all countries conduct their intelligence activities in the same way? If not, what are the reasons for the differences? This class will consider theoretical ways of understanding and assessing national intelligence systems. It will look at political, historical, and cultural factors which may influence the development and functions of nations’ intelligence agencies and systems. The class will include an examination of the "ways of intelligence" of the United States, the United Kingdom, the USSR/Russia, Germany, China, and Iraq, among others.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.766.81 - Economic Growth:The Politics of Development in Asia, Africa and Beyond

    $3897

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    What makes some countries grow while others do not? What accounts for successful economic development versus stagnation?” As these questions become ever more relevant in an increasingly globalized world, this course offers an overview of this vast topic. This multi-disciplinary class begins with an exploration of the concept of development and how it has been viewed from both an economic and a political economy perspective. The second part of the course looks at factors (good governance, well-functioning markets, good health and education) that are necessary to achieve economic growth and development and then we move on to look at potential explanations for the absence of these factors (geography, conflict, culture). The concluding part of the course looks at potential solutions, both external and internal. Throughout the course, specific country examples are highlighted.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.767.81 - Defense Policy

    $3897

    Robert Haffa

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course describes the principal challenges facing the making of American Defense Policy and explains previous and current policies declared and practiced to meet them. The course is designed to inform students on the most pressing defense issues confronting the United States, and to present them a framework for defense policy analysis. It emphasizes understanding those defense policies, analyzing them, and considering and weighing alternative approaches to achieving national objectives of deterrence and defense. The course fosters an understanding of the array of U.S. military capabilities providing plausible responses to the use of military power in support of U.S. foreign policy objectives. It examines those policies in the areas of nuclear, conventional, and irregular forces, and weighs alternatives in shaping the size and structure of those forces to meet national objectives.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.769.81 - Data Science for Public Policy

    $3897

    Holly Brasher

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.777.81 - Technology and Terrorism

    $3897

    Charles Blair

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course explores the phenomenon of terrorism and its nexus with technology. Beginning with an emphasis on terrorist group factors most likely to influence terrorists' perceptions and attitudes towards extant and emerging technologies, the course subsequently investigates cases of terrorist use, and noteworthy non-use, of various technologies. Students also receive a broad understanding of the evolution of technology with an emphasis on current and imminent technologies of acute security concern, including weapons of mass destruction, cyber, robotics, and nanotechnologies. The course then addresses counterterrorism technologies and potential terrorist response actions for overcoming such security efforts. Students operationalize all of these elements in the final phases of the course when engaging in Red Team exercises designed to demonstrate which types of terrorists are most likely to pursue certain types of technologies, the role of tacit versus explicit knowledge, likelihood of successful adoption, targeting options, and potential counterterrorism measures. Please note that students do not need to possess a technical background or prior knowledge of terrorism to succeed in this course.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3897

    Leana Bowman

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This class can serve as a core requirement for Public Management students

    470.799.81 - State Politics: A Year in the Life

    $3897

    Pamela Prah

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    In this course, each student will be assigned to track a particular state as new legislative sessions begin. During the semester, students will examine the key issues that the legislatures, governors and other branches of state government take up and how social issues, budgets and other challenges are met. Students will explore what makes a state “red” or “blue” and what it means for citizens in those states. Of particular interest are states with governors and other state officials who may have aspirations for the White House and states with new political leaders elected the previous fall.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3897

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3897

    Jacob Straus

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.850.82 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3897

    Shawn Reese

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.851.81 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3897

    Kathleen Reedy

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897

    Adam Wolfson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.852.82 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.854.81 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course is a core requirement for students in the MA in Public Management.

    470.855.81 - Research Study Seminar

    $3897

    Sarah Clark

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    $3897

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    This course is only for students who are completing their capstone projects for the MS in Government Analytics program.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course is only for students who are completing their capstone projects for the MS in Government Analytics program.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $500

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    470.902.81 - Sports Impact Leadership Certificate

    $3897


    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International (Cross-Listed)

    420.678.91 - Nature Conservation and Sustainability in Cuba

    $3972

    Jill Caporale
    Jerry Burgess
    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    MTWThF 9:00 - 4:00; 1/2 - 1/22

    This cultural and scientific emersion program will investigate Cuba’s agroecology, tropical marine and terrestrial ecosystems as well as the countries unique geology. As wildlife and habitat have faded from the tropics, Cuba’s importance as an ecological bastion has risen. The island has the largest tracts of untouched rain forest, unspoiled reefs and intact wetlands in the Caribbean islands. Cuba also is home to many unique, or endemic, species, including the solenodon, and the bee hummingbird, the world’s smallest bird. In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn about the marine ecology through first-hand investigation of the reefs off the shores of Cuba, and learn about rainforest ecology through observations of Cuban forests. The course will also examine the interplay between geology, ecology, evolution and adaptation in areas such as coastal xeromorphic vegetation, swamp ecosystems, and Viñales National Park.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.612.81 - Sustainability Science: Concepts and Challenges

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Sustainability Science is an interdisciplinary field engaged with understanding the dynamics between natural and social systems and how those interactions challenge the notion of sustainability. This course will start by reviewing the history of the concept of sustainability and will then consider how it has been applied in the environmental sciences. Specifically the goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perspective on this emerging field, understanding its theory, research horizons, and practical applications. Concepts to be reviewed include socio-environmental systems, complex adaptive systems, cross-scalar impacts, tipping points and regime shifts, vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity, equity, sustainable development, political ecology, governance, capital assets and livelihoods. In a seminar context this course will consider these and other concepts from a theoretical perspective but will focus on their application in solving real-world problems.

    Technology Fee: $200

    425.602.81 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3858

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    $3782

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    430.602.81 - Remote Sensing: Systems and Applications

    $3782

    Kenneth (Jon) Ranson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces remote sensing as an important technology to further our understanding of Earth’s land, atmospheric, and oceanic processes. Students study remote sensing science, techniques, and satellite technologies to become familiar with the types of information that can be obtained and how this information can be applied in the natural and social sciences. Applications include assessment of land cover and land use, mapping and analysis of natural resources, weather and climate studies, pollution detection and monitoring, disaster monitoring, and identification of oceanographic features.Offered once a year in Spring.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.600.81 - Introduction to Geospatial Intelligence

    $3897

    John O'Connor

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an overview of the four disciplines that have merged to create the new discipline of geospatial intelligence and an introduction to the content of the program. The history of imagery analysis and digital cartography, the art of turning observation into insight and communicating those insights to non-experts, the science behind the sensors and platforms, and the mathematics behind imagery collection sampling strategies. The course studies the issues, technologies, and changes over the past 60 years that have developed into geospatial intelligence, and it will introduce the students to the opportunities and challenges of geospatial intelligence as it has shaped intelligence collection, analysis, reporting, and policy decisions. The outcomes of success in this profession have created new industries, and the course will also review the effects of commercial imagery, smallsats, non-governmental collection, and remotely piloted sensors. Students will be introduced to the concepts that will be covered through the remainder of the Master’s program through the Capstone exercise.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    472.611.81 - Analyzing Social Media and Geospatial Information

    $3897

    Veli-Pekka Kivimaki

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Social media is now present globally in everyday life, and in conflicts. With its reach, social media has also become an increasingly meaningful information source for scholars, advocacy groups, intelligence agencies, and others who are interested in shaping public discourse. This course introduces students to social media as part of present day open source information gathering, and how to plan collection and conduct analysis of information from social media. The course covers the operations security considerations, monitoring real time events, verification of online material, basics of social network analysis, and how to work with imagery sourced from social media, including geolocation of imagery. Automation and the limits of it in different phases of the process, and future developments in social media exploitation will also be discussed. During the course, students will conduct a hands-on investigation using social media data.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    425.601.51 - Principles and Applications of Energy Technology

    $3858

    Thomas Jenkin

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    The course examines energy supply and consumption, and how these activities impact the environment, with a focus on understanding the potential technology, market structure and policy implications for climate change. Students will gain a solid understanding of the science, economics, environmental impact associated with various electricity generation technologies, including renewable energy, conventional generation (existing and future), carbon storage and sequestration, and electricity storage. Transportation topics will address a variety of technologies, including hybrids and fuels cells, as well as the potential role for alternative fuels, including biofuels. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    425.603.51 - Climate Change Policy Analysis

    $3858

    Marcus Sarofim

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 5/7

    After a study of the historical development of climate change policy, this course analyzes current policy options for mitigating and adapting to long-term climate change. The course will examine various approaches available in the U.S. for national-level policy, including regulatory and market-based approaches, particularly cap and trade and carbon taxation. Various models for designing a cap and trade system will be studied, including the European experience and regional programs in the United States. Special attention will be paid to methods for setting initial prices and accounting for discounting of future benefits. The course will focus primarily on national-level carbon management policies, but international agreements will also be included, as well as equity considerations on a global level.

    440.661.51 - Public Economics

    $4285

    Frank Weiss

    Monday 6:00 - 8:40; 1/28 - 5/6

    This course analyzes the determinants and properties of government expenditures and social regulation. The first part of the course is generic: It addresses efficiency and equity in income redistribution; the provision of public goods; coping with externalities, addiction and risk; and voting and bureaucracy, and taxation. The second part of the course is particular: It examines health policy, education policy, statutory pensions, and welfare policy in a comparative international context. Prerequisites: 440.601 Microeconomic Theory; 440.602 Macroeconomic Theory. Corequisite:; 440.606 Econometrics.

  • Homewood Campus (Cross-Listed)

    420.614.01 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Jomar Maldonado Vazquez

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/29 - 5/7

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.