Onsite Seminar

JHU Museum Studies Onsite Seminars January Intersession Seminars 2014 (460.610)
A two-week, intensive, period of on-ground museum study in Washington, DC, or in another location organized by the Museum Studies Program, is a required component for graduation. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings; conversations with local museum professionals; observation of and interaction with museum visitors; and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums in the Washington area or an equally suitable site, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and uses of technology in the museum. Students work on directed activities during the two-week period, and the museum visits during the seminars are very focused on the academic work being accomplished. Some seminars require preparatory work before the seminar and follow-up work after the seminar. Please read the descriptions carefully.

Academic Requirements: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program to register for this class, however four or more courses are recommended. (One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602). Requirements may vary for specific seminars, so please read the descriptions carefully.

Enrollment: Most seminars require 14 people to register before they can run. Some seminars may require more than 14. Please read the specific seminar description carefully. (The maximum number of students for each seminar is 20.) If you need the seminar to graduate in that specific semester, please register early. Do not purchase plane tickets or make other investments in your trip until you hear that there are enough participants enrolled. All students will be notified.

Important Note: Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. The museum visits during the seminars are very focused on the academic work being accomplished. Please arrange to spend extra time before or after the seminar in the location if you wish to spend additional time at the museums.

January 2014: Seminar Locations and Dates
1. Washington, DC, Onsite Seminar (460.610.51)
Monday, January 6 – Friday, January 17, 2014
More information below
14 students minimum to run this seminar

2. New York City, NY, Onsite Seminar (460.610.91)
Sunday, January 5 – Friday, January 17, 2014
More information below
14 students minimum to run this seminar

Washington, DC, Onsite Seminar (460.610.51)

Monday, January 6 – Friday, January 17, 2014

Course Description: From Idea to Opening
Exhibitions are the interface between the public and museum collections.   As such they embody many of the vital issues museums are dealing with in a changing world.  Students will visit a variety of Washington, DC museums and support facilities and have conversations with the expert practitioners…all the specialists who collaborate to take an exhibition from idea to opening.  The seminar will explore topics such as innovative strategies, technology, controversy, interpretive planning, marketing and the role of the object’s and visitor’s voice.  Students will meet with traveling exhibition developers, the design director of an independent exhibition firm and the head of the National Park Service Harpers Ferry Design Center, among others.

For the seminar project students will investigate a new learning center at the National Museum of Natural History and create links between objects in the center and objects in art and history museums.

Students will learn/refine media skills to support the documentation of their seminar experiences.  This will involve participation in a shared software environment customized for the seminar to organize daily blogging, video, photography, and social media into a collaboratively produced archive.

Objectives
As a result of participating in this seminar, students will be able to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the exhibition as a collaborative production;
  2. cite, with examples, current exhibition trends;
  3. discuss the concept and application of object-based learning as it applies to exhibition development;
  4. use the techniques of media documentation, production, and presentation;
  5. identify the characteristics, benefits and challenges of a group collaborative approach to a project.

Preliminary list of museums and facilities
National Air and Space Museum; National Museum of Natural History; Newseum; The Smithsonian Institution Office of Exhibits Central; National Park Service Harpers Ferry Design Center National Gallery of Art; National Museum of American History; The National Zoo; National Museum of African American History and Culture

Academic Requirements
Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program to register for this class. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602.

Seminar Leader
The instructor for the Washington, DC seminar is Judith Landau.  This will be the sixth time Ms. Landau has conducted the seminar.  She is the internship coordinator and member of the faculty in the Johns Hopkins University Museum Studies program with over 30 years of museum and teaching experience. Previously, she served as Assistant Director and faculty member of the graduate program in Museum Education at the George Washington University email: jlandau@jhu.edu

Time Commitment
Prepare to be completely “immersed” during the entire two-week period! Students will be busy from 9:00am– 5:00 pm each day, with some evenings and weekend work also required. Do not schedule activities unrelated to the seminar during these two weeks (including the weekend) until the syllabus becomes available. NOTE: There will be some preparatory work for this seminar to be sure everyone is familiar with the software being used.

Significant Others
Friends or partners may accompany students to Washington, DC and may share hotel/dorm rooms. However, they are NOT allowed in class or on field trips.

Accommodations
Students are responsible for making their own accommodations. We have secured rooms at a nearby hotel. Click here to check out the accommodations and make reservations.  Two people can easily share.  You are, of course, free to find your own accommodations but we recommend that you stay close to a Metro line for ease of travel to and from classes.

Dress Code
Informal business attire on the days we visit museums; casual at other times.

Getting around town
We will be using the Metro for which you will have to purchase fare cards.  www.wmata.com/. We will also travel by bus to one site and JHU will cover the costs for this.

Travel Information
Visit the Advanced Academic Student Travel page for information about waiver, liability, and emergency contact forms, and travel and health insurance.

Students traveling to Washington, DC must fill out the following forms:

  1. Student field trip release and waiver of liability form:
  2. Emergency contact form:

Seminar Cost
The cost of the Onsite Seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class in the Museum Studies Program, which is approximately $3,563. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals.  There is an additional $300 field trip fee for the Washington, DC seminar due at registration.

Registration
Full payment of tuition and fees is due at the time of registration. If a student decides to drop this course prior to October 15, $500 of the tuition is nonrefundable.  If a student decides to drop this course after October 15, ALL tuition and fees for this course are nonrefundable. If a student decides to drop this course, an add/drop form must be sent to the registration office. A student may not drop the course online. Students will register for this course in ISIS (https://isis.jhu.edu).

IMPORTANT: Students will be charged $500 regardless of their payment method choices (employer assistance, tuition remission, etc. if they later decide to drop this course. *Refunds will be made if there are not enough people to run the course.* The seminar needs fourteen people to register before it can run. (The maximum number of students for the seminar is 20.) Students planning to graduate in Spring 2014 will be given priority. Students will be required to fill out a waiver form and an emergency contact form.

Important Dates 
September 23, 2013: Registration opens
October 15, 2013: Last day to register, emergency contact information due, waiver form due
January 6, 2014: Seminar begins (runs through January 17, 2014)

NYC, New York Onsite Seminar (2014)

Sunday, January 5 – Friday, January 17, 2014

Course Description:  Museum Users!
Museums must articulate their “public value” to civic leaders and funders, and, at the same time, are responding to popular and academic criticisms about the educational, inspirational and/or entertaining nature of the museum experience.  NYC seminar students will visit a range of museums and start by reflecting upon their own expectations, reactions and responses. Through daily activities in a variety of museums, conversations with museum professionals, observations of visitors, and class sessions, students will be introduced to the planning and decision-making processes and some of the most exciting examples of new ways of thinking about participant audiences and the museum experience. As they explore and discuss strategies that are designed to engage visitors, including exhibition design, educational and public programming, live interpretation, and technology-based activities, they will gather and evaluate a diverse catalog of practices for a variety of audiences. The goal of the two-week intensive is to develop a set of strategic and practical recommendations for The Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum. Through individual reflection and final small-group presentations for museum staff, participants will respond to the specific challenges presented by a unique museum/ national landmark/ major attraction that is dedicated to “promoting the awareness and understanding of history, science and service through its collections, exhibitions and programming” and welcomes more than 915,000 people each year.

Details

  • The group will make formal visits to a range of different types of NYC-area museums – art museums, children’s museums, history museums, memorial sites, and science museums, as well as visits to local museum exhibition design studios
  • Everyday we will visit at least one museum/location; most days by public transportation. Students must purchase their own MTA tickets and a student membership to the American Association of Museums.
  • Students will be expected to actively participate in daily discussions, and keep a daily reflection journal.
  • In addition to participation in a group presentation, students will be asked to submit a final paper after the NYC experience. 
  • Students are expected to review museum websites for educational materials and collection information before site visits.
  • If you have a laptop (PC or Mac), a tablet and a smartphone please bring everything with you.
  • Wear warm layers, waterproof shoes or boots, and casual business attire (no jeans).

Course Objectives
As a result of participating in this course, students will be able to:

  • Define and apply a spectrum of approaches and strategies employed by museums to engage visitors
  • Identify current and future issues facing museum professionals, including designers, educators and curators
  • Examine and discuss the diverse ways that museums encourage interactivity and meet the various needs and expectations of their current and potential visitors
  • Develop criteria and tools for measuring levels of visitor engagement in a particular institution or exhibition
  • Identify the characteristics, benefits and challenges of working on a collaborative project
  • Practice observation, reflection and professional presentation skills in critiquing and offering recommendations to peers and colleagues

Assessment
You will be graded on the quality of your participation in all Seminar activities and assignments, as well as adherence to requirements for attendance and engagement as follows:

  • 10% Attendance (all events/project work, etc.)
  • 20% Blog (Individual journals/ daily reflections)
  • 10% Onsite Participation (questions, contributions)
  • 35% Group project (Group Presentation)
  • 25% Reflective Paper (Due one-week after conclusion of course)

Academic Requirements
Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program to register for this class, one of which must be 460.601 or 460.602.

Seminar Team
The seminar will be organized by Sonnet Takahisa, currently a consultant who works in museums, cultural institutions and schools, focusing on teaching and learning, public engagement, community building, and educational reform.  For over thirty years, she has been a consistent voice for excellence and equity on national and local task forces for museums and libraries, the NYC Department of Education, government funding agencies, and private foundations.  Recently she served as Vice President for Education at Seaport Museum New York where she was a member of the administrative team focusing on overall master planning issues. Ms. Takahisa has over 30 years of experience in museums and schools; she has served on numerous review panels, task forces, boards, and as a consultant to museums, arts organizations, schools, and afterschool programs. She worked as an educator at the Boston Children’s Museum, Seattle Art Museum, and Brooklyn Museum.  She excels at bringing together people from different worlds and creates opportunities in which they can work collaboratively; this continues to be a valuable asset in her work as a consultant to schools and cultural institutions around the world.  Sonnet Takahisa will be joined by other metropolitan-area JHU faculty and alumni throughout the seminar.

Carolina Puente will serve as the teaching assistant.

Time Commitment
Bring warm clothes and comfortable shoes, and be prepared to explore the NYC museum world.  The seminar will begin on Sunday, January 5 for orientation and students will be busy from 9:00am – 5:00pm each day, with some evenings and weekend work required. 

Significant others
Friends or partners may accompany students to NYC and may share hotel rooms.  However, they are NOT allowed in class or on visits to museums and other sites.

Accommodations
A block of rooms will be reserved at a centrally located hotel, with good subway access to most NYC neighborhoods. Students will be responsible for getting their own NYC MTA subway and/or NJ metro pass to travel to museum sites.

Travel Information
Please see the Advanced Academic Student travel page for information about waiver, liability, and emergency contact forms, and travel and health insurance.

Seminar Cost
The cost of the Onsite Seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class in the Museum Studies program, which is $3361.  Students are responsible for travel to and from NYC, accommodations, local travel (unlimited NYC Seven-Day Metrocards are recommended), and meals, as well as any specific field trips.  Additional fees for the NYC seminar include a $300 field trip fee due at the time of registration.

Registration
Full payment of tuition and fees is due at the time of registration. If a student decides to drop this course prior to October 15, $500 of the tuition is nonrefundable.  If a student decides to drop this course after October 15, ALL tuition and fees for this course are nonrefundable. If a student decides to drop this course, an add/drop form must be sent to the registration office. A student may not drop the course online. Students will register for this course in ISIS (https://isis.jhu.edu).

IMPORTANT: Students will be charged $500 regardless of their payment method choices (employer assistance, tuition remission, etc. if they later decide to drop this course. *Refunds will be made if there are not enough people to run the course.* The seminar needs fourteen people to register before it can run. (The maximum number of students for the seminar is 20.) Students planning to graduate in Spring 2014 will be given priority.  Students will be required to fill out a waiver form and an emergency contact form.

Important Dates
September 23, 2013: Registration opens
October 15, 2013: Last day to register, emergency contact information due, waiver form due
January 5, 2014: Seminar begins (runs through January 17, 2014)

Questions about the seminars, email Phyllis Hecht