Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Online Courses

    460.601.81 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4167

    Phillip Bahar

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.601.82 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4167

    Gregory Stevens

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.602.81 - Museums in the Digital Age

    $4167

    Robin Dowden

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    With the emergence of new media and the ever-expanding use of the Internet, the traditional role and scope of the museum is changing. The museum has a new position in global communication, dissemination of information and cultural understanding. The introduction of technology into the museum is challenging traditional exhibition concepts, introducing new interactions with museum audiences, and affecting the museum’s core operations. This course introduces students to the museum field and explores the impact of media and technology on the museum, including an overview of the historical role of the museum in society and an examination of the current uses and effects of digitization, the Internet, and wireless technologies in these institutions, as well as basic concepts underlying the planning of a technology project for a museum. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.601 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.604.81 - Introduction to Museum Education

    $4167

    William Crow

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    This course introduces students to the educational role of the museum. What benefits and services does museum education provide in a pluralistic society? What do educators do within the museum organization? We begin by tracing the history of education in museums. We review theories about how people learn, what constitutes good teaching practice in the museum, and the unique role that objects play in an informal learning environment. We look at the different kinds of audiences for education programs, how to develop museum experiences including effective education programs and services, how evaluation works in gathering feedback and assessing outcomes in a museum setting, and the role of educators in inter- and intra-museum collaborative projects such as the development of exhibition interpretation, marketing for educational programs, audience building and interpretive planning. This course also considers the role and integration of digital technologies in the provision of educational services, products and programs. As a culminating project, students research and develop a conference proposal based on an education-related topic of their choice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.606.81 - Exhibition Strategies

    $4167

    Gail Ringel

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    This course introduces the diverse strategies and approaches used in exhibition planning, development and implementation. It asks students to think critically about exhibitions and the interface between objects, concept and experience. The course focuses on visitor-centered interpretive design and is applicable to a wide range of institutions. Students spend much of the semester working together in small teams, collaboratively producing a comprehensive exhibition project as they walk through the practical steps in exhibition development and design. Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    460.608.81 - The Business of Museums

    $4167

    Robert Beatty

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Museums are stewards of cultural heritage and intellectual property, vortices of knowledge, and arbiters of taste. They are community icons, places of respite, and public education adjuncts. Museums don’t necessarily deal in products for profit, yet they compete in an entertainment ecology. They must cultivate members, donors, government funds and corporate contributions, and rely on programs, gifts, grants, sponsorships, retail operations, and planned giving to survive. They must advocate for themselves in the legislative arena, while constricted by their nonprofit status. Students will become conversant in the fundamentals of museum business including mission, nonprofit status, transparency, governance, programming, management, finance, fundraising, facilities, legal and ethics issues, the impact of technologies, and everchanging audiences. They will achieve this through readings, thought-provoking essays, engaging discussions, museum news analysis, recorded public talks, and live online discussions with leading museum professionals.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.608.82 - The Business of Museums

    $4167

    Leonard Steinbach

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Museums are stewards of cultural heritage and intellectual property, vortices of knowledge, and arbiters of taste. They are community icons, places of respite, and public education adjuncts. Museums don’t necessarily deal in products for profit, yet they compete in an entertainment ecology. They must cultivate members, donors, government funds and corporate contributions, and rely on programs, gifts, grants, sponsorships, retail operations, and planned giving to survive. They must advocate for themselves in the legislative arena, while constricted by their nonprofit status. Students will become conversant in the fundamentals of museum business including mission, nonprofit status, transparency, governance, programming, management, finance, fundraising, facilities, legal and ethics issues, the impact of technologies, and everchanging audiences. They will achieve this through readings, thought-provoking essays, engaging discussions, museum news analysis, recorded public talks, and live online discussions with leading museum professionals.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.611.81 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    $4167

    Laura-Edythe Coleman

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.615.81 - Museums and Community Engagement

    $4167

    Candace Matelic

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course explores how museums and cultural organizations of all sizes can strengthen their relationships with the communities they serve. No longer are museums measured and judged solely by their internal resources—collections, endowments, facilities, and staff—but rather by the external benefits and value they create for individuals and communities. Growing numbers of museums are learning to make their organizations more meaningful and relevant by involving their communities in ongoing planning and decision-making. They are reframing museum activities to focus on what matters to their communities. By getting involved in community challenges and developing new partnerships, they are identifying underserved audiences and creating memorable visitor experiences. As museums begin this journey towards community engagement, they are initiating and facilitating social change and moving towards social entrepreneurship. This course includes the theory and skills of community engagement, drawing on both research and practice for examples.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.621.81 - Evaluation Theory & Techniques for Museums

    $4167

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course covers evaluation theory, methodologies, and practical implementation of evaluation in museums and similar environments. The class explores the three main stages of evaluation and what can be achieved at each stage. Exhibition and program evaluation will be covered. Students work independently and in small groups to develop an evaluation plan, clear evaluation questions, an interview tool and an observation tool. Students will compare evaluation methods, and learn how to ask the “right” questions. Emphasis is given on thinking about how to evaluate the holistic museum experience – what is working and what is not: educationally, physically, and socially.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.632.81 - Practice of Public History

    $4167

    Russell Stoermer

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    The overarching theme of the course is to introduce students--both traditional and professional--to public history as it is, and might be, practiced. From historic houses to battlefields, institutes, and preservation advocacy, the course is intended to blend theory and experience by providing an informed and engaging overview of the many practical aspects of, trends in, and professional opportunities offered by, public history, as well as introduce them to the challenges that currently face the field. By the end of the course, students will know the many different ways in which public history is practiced today within and without the museum, and be able to broadly evaluate public history sites, from programming and interpretation to marketing and fundraising.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.636.81 - Living Collections

    $4167

    Sarah Chicone

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Zoos, aquaria, botanical gardens, and nature preserves, like many other museums, are collection-based institutions. This course explores the unique character of these institutions in their core functional areas including the special considerations and challenges of caring for, interpreting, and exhibiting living collections. Developed by three museum professionals with specialties in terrestrial, aquatic, and botanic institutions-course topics are explored through the lenses unique to plants, animals, and marine life. In addition to understanding the core functional areas of these museums students will analyze the complex social role of cultural institutions which are devoted to the living world.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.637.81 - Curating Online Exhibitions and Experiences

    $4167

    Nikolaos Apostolides

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Today, every museum must have an effective online presence. Increasingly, museum professionals from multiple disciplines – curatorial, collections management, new media, publications, external affairs, etc. – need to collaborate to create online exhibitions and experiences. It is essential that museum professionals have a solid grounding in the theory of online curation, as well as the practical skills to plan, design, and implement online exhibitions and experiences that capture the imagination of online museum visitors. Students will discuss questions such as: What are the unique challenges of curating online? How are the aesthetics of online spaces similar and/or different from traditional bricks and mortar museum galleries and exhibit spaces? What strategies and methodologies can the curator and other museum professionals apply to successfully educate, inform, and engage online exhibition visitors? What are the trends in curating online museum exhibitions, and where does the future lie in this exciting new area of the museum field? Course readings, assignments and discussions will culminate in a research paper on current trends in online curation in museums.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.638.81 - Preservation of Analog and Digital Photographs

    $4167

    Millard Schisler

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    This course will explore the main principles in caring for analog and digital photographic collections. It has been designed as a broad approach to the subject, but with enough depth to give the student an approach to the care for photographic collections with both historical and natively born digital photographs. This course will provide this insight from looking at the materials that photographs are composed of, understanding the materials and environment that they are housed in, and the technologies and workflows needed to care for analog and natively born digital photographs for long-term preservation. Students will be required to build and present a case study and a final project discussing a topic related to the course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.640.81 - Educational Programming for Museum Audiences

    $4167

    Anna Slafer

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Educational programming for today's museums requires more skills than ever before, from defining mission-driven educational goals to conducting summative evaluation, from understanding learning theory and characteristics of a myriad of museum audiences, to designing and implementing technology solutions. Students in this course will learn the steps needed to design sound educational programming in museums, including developmentally appropriate learning theory and strategies for audiences such as children, families, adults, teachers, and students. Prerequisite: Introduction to Museum Education (460.604)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Introduction to Museum Education - 460.604

    460.666.81 - Collection Management

    $4167

    Carlos Hernandez

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.666.82 - Collection Management

    $4167

    Joan Bacharach

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.667.81 - Collection Management Systems

    $4167

    Kate Collen

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    Collections Management Systems, the workhorses of museum information technology, provide staff members and the public alike with access to collections information for a myriad of purposes. In this course, we will look at how these systems have evolved from their traditional role as registration tools to rich repositories of collection information, with the potential to interface with other types of systems, both inside and beyond the museum walls. This course introduces widely used museum Collections Management Systems in a series of developer-led presentations, providing students with the opportunity to evaluate how collections management transactions are performed using various software. Students will learn the basic features of Collections Information Policies and how to apply museum standards to analyze these policies. Data migration planning – from paper to electronic, and electronic to electronic --will be discussed, as well as emerging technologies used in conjunction with traditional Collections Management Systems. This is a must-have course for students with the goal of becoming a registrar, collections manager, or digital curator. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to take Collection Management (460.666) before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students are strongly encouraged to take Collection Management (460.666) before enrolling in this course

    460.670.81 - Digital Preservation

    $4167

    Charles Patch

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    This course introduces students to the current state of digital preservation, preservation challenges, and basic concepts for designing effective digital preservation plans and programs. Topics include the relevance of digital preservation for museums; archival principles that inform preservation practices; standards and policies; considerations in preservation strategies; issues relating to formats, repositories, and processes; and emerging preservation solutions and services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take Collection Management (460.666) before enrolling in this course.

    460.673.81 - Digital Curation Certificate Internship

    $4167

    Joyce Ray

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    The internship, including at least 120 hours of field experience, affords students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with experts who are leading digital curation activities in museums and related cultural heritage organizations in the U.S. and abroad. The internship is a partnership between the university and the host institution, and is customized to meet each student’s needs and career goals. The program will assist students in arranging appropriate internships. Student interns will produce evidence of their accomplishments through work products, project reports, or other documentation in an online course component and will participate in online discussion forums with other students enrolled in digital curation internships during the same semester. The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Students should discuss internship plans with the program coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    460.674.81 - Digital Curation Research Paper

    $4167

    Joyce Ray

    Online 5/16 - 8/22

    The supervised research course enables students to investigate a significant problem or issue in digital curation and to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills. Ideally, the research paper will build on the student’s internship experience. The research paper is expected to result in a publishable or presentable paper that makes a contribution to the literature and field of digital curation. As there is currently a significant need for research in digital curation, and relatively little published literature—especially relating to museums—student research in this program can make a major contribution, and graduates will be prepared for careers as leaders in the field. Course work, assignments, and meetings with a faculty member will take place in an online course environment. The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the digital curation certificate program.

    460.691.81 - Innovation and the Modern Museum

    $4167

    Arthur Molella

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course explores how museums today are searching for new ways to incorporate creativity and innovation in their missions, practices, displays, and programs. Like other educational and cultural institutions, they are seeking to nurture their own cultures of innovation and to play a greater role in “creative place-making” in towns and cities everywhere. This effort is not limited to the “Maker Faires” and exhibits about invention at science and technology centers/museums. It is also seen, for example, in art and design museum displays about artistic creativity, including digital art and videogame graphics; in exhibits about technological, social, and cultural invention in museums of history and anthropology; in novel approaches at children’s museums. Impossible to ignore is the spirit of innovation expressed in modern museum architecture. The course also looks to the future of museum innovation, in such areas as curation, education, and public outreach. It explores how cutting-edge digital technologies, including 3-D imaging and replication, and how ‘virtual museums’ will transform the interpretation and presentation of artifact collections, both within and far beyond museum walls. In weekly discussion forums and special projects, including the development of their own “innovation plans,” students will be encouraged to draw upon their own powers of creativity and innovation.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.695.81 - Museums of the Americas: Facing Challenges in the 21st Century

    $4167

    Deborah Ziska

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Inspired by the diverse peoples, cultures, and ecosystems of the Americas, students will explore issues of and museum responses to socioeconomic disparity, climate change and environmental degradation, and cultural heritage preservation. Video and audio interviews with museum and cultural heritage leaders in Colombia, Guatemala, and the United States; live presentations by experts on hemispheric climate change and oceanic marine life; plus a variety of multimedia presentations and assignments, will spotlight innovation, affinities, community engagement, and sustainable practices of museums throughout the Americas in meeting challenges of the 21st century. Students will have the opportunity to analyze and share how museums where they live are responding to similar issues.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    460.610.91 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    Robert Beatty

    Monday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/11 - 5/25
    Tuesday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/12 - 5/25
    Wednesday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/8 - 5/25
    Thursday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/9 - 5/25
    Friday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/10 - 5/25

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    NASHVILLE, TN - TWO-WEEK ONSITE SEMINAR - May 14-25, 2018 The cost of the Onsite Seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class in the Museum Studies Program, which is approximately *$4,085. There is an additional $350 field trip fee for the Nashville seminar. *Pending tuition subject to change effective Summer 2018 Registration Students will register for this course (AS.460.610.91.SU18) in SIS (https://sis.jhu.edu). This course needs 10 students to run. (The maximum number of students is 20.) Those planning to graduate in Summer 2018 will be given preference. (Registration January 16th at 10am - March 1, 2018 at 11:59pm)

    460.610.92 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    Alan Morrison

    Sunday 9:00 - 5:00; 7/8 - 8/19
    Monday 9:00 - 5:00; 7/9 - 8/20
    Tuesday 9:00 - 5:00; 7/10 - 8/21
    Wednesday 9:00 - 5:00; 7/11 - 8/22
    Thursday 9:00 - 5:00; 7/12 - 8/16

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    LONDON, ENGLAND - TWO-WEEK ONSITE SEMINAR - July 8-20, 2018 (460.610.92) The cost of the Onsite Seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class in the Museum Studies Program, which is approximately *$4,085. There is an additional $500 field trip fee for the London seminar. *Pending tuition subject to change effective Summer 2018 Registration Students will register for this course (AS.460.610.92.SU18) in SIS (https://sis.jhu.edu). This course needs 14 students to run. (The maximum number of students is 20.) Those planning to graduate in Summer 2018 will be given preference.

    460.750.91 - Museum Internship

    $4167

    Judith Landau

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/16 - 8/22

    An internship at a student’s local museum, approved by the internship coordinator, may be substituted for one elective course. To fulfill the internship requirement, a student must complete a minimum of 80 hours of work onsite and a project, (either a research paper or a practical product) on an approved topic related to his/her experience, due at the end of the semester. Students also participate in online discussion and course work during the semester. Before registering for the internship option, the student should contact the internship coordinator for approval. At least four to six weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place, the student must submit: 1) a description of the internship weekly duties including activities and/or responsibilities; 2) learning objectives and goals; 3) why this experience should be part of the Museum Studies degree; and 4) a signed letter of commitment from the internship supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

    Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship. This course runs 5/16/18-8/22/18

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    465.732.81 - Engaging Communities in Heritage: Ownership, Stewardship, Sustainability, and Creative Cultural Expression

    $4167

    Linda Norris

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/16 - 8/22

    Museums and other heritage institutions are increasingly recognizing the value of "bottom-up" heritage programming. This class will explore issues related to community engagement in the heritage sector as well as strategize ways to engage various constituencies in the formulation, collection, and presentation of their heritage. We will use global case studies (as related to memory and memorial, sites of conscience, marginalized histories, indigenous heritage, and eco-museums) to explore the challenges faced by such projects. Examining both the failures and successes will result in a broader understanding of best practices in the field and help us formulate effective strategies for future engagement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00