Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Online Courses

    460.601.81 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4085

    Phyllis Hecht

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.602.81 - Museums in the Digital Age

    $4085

    John Talasek

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    With the emergence of new media and the ever-expanding use of the Internet, the traditional role and scope of the museum is changing. The museum has a new position in global communication, dissemination of information and cultural understanding. The introduction of technology into the museum is challenging traditional exhibition concepts, introducing new interactions with museum audiences, and affecting the museum’s core operations. This course introduces students to the museum field and explores the impact of media and technology on the museum, including an overview of the historical role of the museum in society and an examination of the current uses and effects of digitization, the Internet, and wireless technologies in these institutions, as well as basic concepts underlying the planning of a technology project for a museum. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.601 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.604.81 - Introduction to Museum Education

    $4085

    Mary Redmond-Jones

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the educational role of the museum. What benefits and services does museum education provide in a pluralistic society? What do educators do within the museum organization? We begin by tracing the history of education in museums. We review theories about how people learn, what constitutes good teaching practice in the museum, and the unique role that objects play in an informal learning environment. We look at the different kinds of audiences for education programs, how to develop museum experiences including effective education programs and services, how evaluation works in gathering feedback and assessing outcomes in a museum setting, and the role of educators in inter- and intra-museum collaborative projects such as the development of exhibition interpretation, marketing for educational programs, audience building and interpretive planning. This course also considers the role and integration of digital technologies in the provision of educational services, products and programs. As a culminating project, students research and develop a conference proposal based on an education-related topic of their choice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.604.82 - Introduction to Museum Education

    $4085

    Jacqueline Eyl

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the educational role of the museum. What benefits and services does museum education provide in a pluralistic society? What do educators do within the museum organization? We begin by tracing the history of education in museums. We review theories about how people learn, what constitutes good teaching practice in the museum, and the unique role that objects play in an informal learning environment. We look at the different kinds of audiences for education programs, how to develop museum experiences including effective education programs and services, how evaluation works in gathering feedback and assessing outcomes in a museum setting, and the role of educators in inter- and intra-museum collaborative projects such as the development of exhibition interpretation, marketing for educational programs, audience building and interpretive planning. This course also considers the role and integration of digital technologies in the provision of educational services, products and programs. As a culminating project, students research and develop a conference proposal based on an education-related topic of their choice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.606.81 - Exhibition Strategies

    $4085

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces the diverse strategies and approaches used in exhibition planning, development and implementation. It asks students to think critically about exhibitions and the interface between objects, concept and experience. The course focuses on visitor-centered interpretive design and is applicable to a wide range of institutions. Students spend much of the semester working together in small teams, collaboratively producing a comprehensive exhibition project as they walk through the practical steps in exhibition development and design. Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    460.606.82 - Exhibition Strategies

    $4085

    Richard Kissel

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces the diverse strategies and approaches used in exhibition planning, development and implementation. It asks students to think critically about exhibitions and the interface between objects, concept and experience. The course focuses on visitor-centered interpretive design and is applicable to a wide range of institutions. Students spend much of the semester working together in small teams, collaboratively producing a comprehensive exhibition project as they walk through the practical steps in exhibition development and design. Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.608.81 - The Business of Museums

    $4085

    Leonard Steinbach

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Museums are stewards of cultural heritage and intellectual property, vortices of knowledge, and arbiters of taste. They are community icons, places of respite, and public education adjuncts. Museums don’t necessarily deal in products for profit, yet they compete in an entertainment ecology. They must cultivate members, donors, government funds and corporate contributions, and rely on programs, gifts, grants, sponsorships, retail operations, and planned giving to survive. They must advocate for themselves in the legislative arena, while constricted by their nonprofit status. Students will become conversant in the fundamentals of museum business including mission, nonprofit status, transparency, governance, programming, management, finance, fundraising, facilities, legal and ethics issues, the impact of technologies, and everchanging audiences. They will achieve this through readings, thought-provoking essays, engaging discussions, museum news analysis, recorded public talks, and live online discussions with leading museum professionals.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.609.81 - Museums in a Global Perspective

    $4085

    Laura-Edythe Coleman

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    In this intensive course, students participate in collaborative role play to debate urgent issues confronting museums in the 21st century. Through readings, research, and extensive teamwork, students explore, analyze, develop, and discuss a range of policies and procedures that link museums to international communities and trends. Students examine and experience (through simulation) the significant effects and challenges of a globalizing world on museum mission, preservation of cultural heritage, and exhibition practice. Students gain experience in debating global issues that will have an impact on the future of museums as well as developing and writing effective program proposals. The collaborative aspect of this course requires the flexibility to schedule working sessions every other week with an assigned team. Note: Students must have completed two courses in the program to register for this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.611.81 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    $4085

    Porchia Moore

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.611.82 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    $4085

    Laura-Edythe Coleman

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.616.81 - Museums, Law, and Policy

    $4085

    Melissa Levine

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Legal issues and concepts are a fundamental part of the day-today management of museums and the policies that shape the nature of museums. This course introduces students to the ways in which museums are affected by the law and key legal concepts. Discussions and assignments will address practical concerns as well as policy and conceptual matters, incorporated cases, mock negotiations, and group discussions. Students will be able to identify issues from hypotheticals and relevant legal concerns and resources. The course will help students understand legal matters in museum practice in an applied manner. Legal and policy discussions will include current issues in copyright, freedom of speech and censorship matters, and collections issues including cultural heritage developments.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.620.81 - Accessibility in the Museum

    $4085

    Mary McGinnis

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Making museums and their information and collections accessible to people with disabilities concerns more than ramps and restrooms. People with disabilities can encounter barriers to every aspect of the museum experience, from finding out about exhibitions and educational offerings before a visit through advertising or the museum’s website; to getting to, into and around the museum galleries and other public spaces; to hearing tours and lectures, reading labels and signs, and using interactive tools; to participating in educational programs. This course will introduce students to the key concepts and issues associated with making museums accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.621.81 - Evaluation Theory & Techniques for Museums

    $4085

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course covers evaluation theory, methodologies, and practical implementation of evaluation in museums and similar environments. The class explores the stages of evaluation, what can be achieved at each stage, and how to work with clients. Students practice developing clear evaluation questions, developing a robust evaluation plan, choosing appropriate methods, assessing the benefits and trade-offs of different evaluation strategies and designing and refining evaluation tools. Emphasis is given to the opportunities and challenges of evaluating all types of museum experiences (programs, exhibitions, architecture, wayfinding systems, various interpretive technology, etc.) from multiple points of view, including museum visitors and museum staff. Hands-on evaluation practice will be gained through testing and refining observation and interview tools in a museum setting.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.630.81 - Exhibition Design, Construction, and Documentation

    $4085

    David Whitemyer

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Understanding the exhibition design process, from concept to implementation, is valuable not just for exhibition developers, but also for registrars, curators and museum educators. Looking beyond artifacts, storyline and aesthetics, this course examines the rarely explored, but essential, aspects of exhibition design, from drawings and specifications to contracting and installation. Topics will include drawing packages and project documentation, schedules, client and developer responsibilities, project budget, architectural coordination, fabrication techniques, and legal and practical contracting considerations. As with general construction, the exhibition designers and fabricators follow industry standards, and whether a museum is a public or private organization, specific rules must be followed for solicitation and contracting. Prerequisite: Exhibition Strategies (460.606)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Exhibition Strategies (460.606)

    460.633.81 - Core Aspects of Conservation: A 21st Century Approach

    $4085

    Rose Cull
    Daniel Cull

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The conservation, preservation, and restoration of cultural heritage is an increasingly complex practice within the museum context, and one that benefits greatly from widely-shared knowledge and collaborative networks. Today a variety of highly-specialized conservators perform treatments on individual items of high value, while at the same time there are a growing amount of conservation-related issues that collections managers, registrars, and others are responsible for in the process of caring for collections. This class will give students the opportunity to work in and around conservation issues and tasks, while assimilating and contributing to the existing body of knowledge in collections care (preventive conservation). A variety of media used to create and conserve artworks will be discussed. Assignments will be coordinated with or related to current web-based conservation projects, including Wikipedia, ConservationReel, and AIC’s Lexicon Project. Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    460.639.81 - Material Culture and the Modern Museum

    $4085

    Colette Apelian

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    From the Mona Lisa to Archie Bunker’s easy chair, museums play a critical role in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of objects. This course looks closely at the development of material culture studies and its connection to museums in the 21st century. Students will explore collecting as meaningful action, the classification of objects (from academic categorizations to tags and folksonomies) and their access (from collections to archives, to physical and virtual display). Student-developed object biographies will be used throughout the semester to explore the life history of objects, their changing meanings, and their relationship to self, society, and the museum. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to have completed two courses in the program before registering for this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students are strongly encouraged to have completed two courses in the program before registering for this course.

    460.640.81 - Educational Programming for Museum Audiences

    $4085

    Robert Beatty

    Online 1/8 - 5/7

    Educational programming for today's museums requires more skills than ever before, from defining mission-driven educational goals to conducting summative evaluation, from understanding learning theory and characteristics of a myriad of museum audiences, to designing and implementing technology solutions. Students in this course will learn the steps needed to design sound educational programming in museums, including developmentally appropriate learning theory and strategies for audiences such as children, families, adults, teachers, and students. Prerequisite: Introduction to Museum Education (460.604)

    460.641.81 - Digital Media in the Museum

    $4085

    Elizabeth Levy

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Digital media is a crucial part of a museum’s visitor engagement strategy and it plays an integral role in such areas as informational programming, marketing, wayfinding, and interpretation. Students in this course will examine the impact of a wide range of technologies including mobile guides, multi-touch tables, augmented reality games, and immersive theater environments, on both museum professionals and visitors. Through readings, interviews with multimedia professionals, hands-on experience, and papers, students will learn the practical applications of digital technology while developing the critical skills necessary to evaluate both the use of technology and the best way to integrate it into the museum environment. This course provides students with the basic skills to plan, manage, and assess the production of successful in-museum digital media projects. Students will have the opportunity to produce their own project plan for a real or imagined production. Prerequisite: Museums in the Digital Age (460.602)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Museums in the Digital Age (460.602)

    460.657.81 - Fundamentals of Museum Fundraising

    $4085

    Rosalia Crosby

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Through a combination of current and historical readings, case studies, discussions, and written assignments based on “real-life” scenarios, this course will cover general fundraising strategies and ethics, ePhilanthropy, prospect research, grant writing, annual and capital campaigns, corporate giving and cause marketing, special events and stewardship.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.663.81 - Social Media Strategies for Museums

    $4085

    Meagan Estep

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    From #AskACurator to Snapchat selfies, social media has permeated the work of museum staff and the people who visit them. In this course, we will explore social media trends and their relevance for museums, including marketing, fundraising, education, and curatorial functions. Students will explore case studies, talk with leading museum social media practitioners, and develop social media strategies to meet specific museum objectives.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.665.81 - Introduction to Archives

    $4085

    Christopher Steele

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of archives, including an overview relating to the elements of an archival program and the role and work of archivists. Special attention will be paid to the work of archivists in a museum context. The theoretical component of the course will be supplemented with a variety of hands-on exercises, case studies, and informed anecdotes designed to illustrate the relationship between theory and practice. Although American archival tradition will be the focus, international perspectives on archival theory and practice will play an important role in the course of study. Topics include: acquisition; appraisal; arrangement and description; preservation; reference; outreach; archival access systems; legal and ethical issues; and born-digital curation, including digital preservation.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.666.81 - Collection Management

    $4085

    Marla Misunas

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.666.82 - Collection Management

    $4085

    Carlos Hernandez

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.668.81 - Cataloging Museum Collections: History, Standards, and Applications

    $4085

    Kate Collen

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Cultural heritage institutions—including museums, libraries, and archives—have as core responsibilities the safeguarding of the objects in their care and the education of the public about these objects. To support both of these responsibilities, one of the foundational activities of cultural heritage professionals is the cataloging of the objects in their collections. This course will provide both an overview and practicum of cataloging definitions, philosophies, standards, and practices. Recordkeeping methods, numbering systems and data formats will be emphasized, and professionally accepted standards for cataloging various cultural objects will be reviewed. Discussion of the broad application of cataloging data sets, including cross collection aggregation and search, delivery to the public, and Web 2.0 and 3.0 delivery methods will be covered.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.670.81 - Digital Preservation

    $4085

    Lora Woodford

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the current state of digital preservation, preservation challenges, and basic concepts for designing effective digital preservation plans and programs. Topics include the relevance of digital preservation for museums; archival principles that inform preservation practices; standards and policies; considerations in preservation strategies; issues relating to formats, repositories, and processes; and emerging preservation solutions and services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.671.81 - Foundations of Digital Curation

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course lays a foundation for managing digital information throughout its life cycle by introducing students to the emerging field of digital curation and by examining the practical issues and tools involved in managing digital collections and repositories over time. Topics include metadata schemas for describing digital assets in different disciplines; sharing digital content beyond the institution to reach wider audiences; requirements for trustworthy repository services; management of research data; policy issues; and user services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.674.81 - Digital Curation Research Paper

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The supervised research course enables students to investigate a significant problem or issue in digital curation and to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills. Ideally, the research paper will build on the student’s internship experience. The research paper is expected to result in a publishable or presentable paper that makes a contribution to the literature and field of digital curation. As there is currently a significant need for research in digital curation, and relatively little published literature—especially relating to museums—student research in this program can make a major contribution, and graduates will be prepared for careers as leaders in the field. Course work, assignments, and meetings with a faculty member will take place in an online course environment. The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    460.684.81 - Museums, Finance, and the Economy

    $4085

    Douglas Robertson

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines how changes in the economy can affect museum income, expenditures, fundraising, endowments and attendance. It explores how various museum practices can mitigate the effects of a weak economy and capitalize on a strong economy. Through case studies of large and small museums, students examine information sources that managers use to identify changes in the local, regional, and national economy, which might affect their institutions. Students gain familiarity with economic and museum financial information by adopting two museums and tracking how changes in their finances and attendance relate to shifts in the economy. This course is critical for all students interested in the “behind-the-scenes” of museum management, including those with little or no background in finance or economics.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.685.81 - Private Collections and Museums: The New Frontier

    $4085

    Barbara Chamberlain

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    An increasingly significant amount of our cultural and historical heritage is in private collections and outside the protective sphere of public institutions. Numbering in the tens of thousands in just the U.S., private collections span a great variety of objects reflecting the wide range of enthusiasts who collect them. This course will explore private collectors and trends in their collecting plus the similarities and differences between public and private collections and museums. It will help prepare students for the unique challenges they may face, illustrated by real world examples and interviews with collectors, curators, collections managers, and service providers plus hands-on experience. It will include developing problem solving strategies and project management skills they can use to adapt and implement institutional ethics and best practices, especially as private collections evolve into public museums. Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    460.686.81 - Culturally Specific Museums

    $4085

    Redell Hearn

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Museums have the potential to provide safe spaces for comprehensive cultural inquiry. Culturally specific museums provide strategic platforms for showcasing diverse sets of art, history and culture with the intention of reaching a broad set of visitors. This course examines the significance of culturally specific museums, both individually and in relation to mainstream museums, to better understand how public culture engages issues of art, history, aesthetics, religion, ethnicity, and politics. Through the combination of contemporary reading material, survey of six national culturally specific museums, synchronous and a-synchronous discussion forums and guest speakers, students will discuss some of the ways in which culturally specific museums help make up the fabric of culture represented in museums in the United States of America.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.702.81 - Studies in World Heritage

    $4085

    Sarah Chicone

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of the World Heritage movement by focusing on the concept of heritage, both tangible and intangible, its historical development, its international conventions, and the role of technology in its past, present, and future. Students will be asked to engage critically with contemporary heritage concepts such as authenticity, ownership, assessment, value, and preservation that form much of our global understanding of the field of cultural heritage studies. Through case studies, lectures, discussions, and readings, students will explore international heritage policy as structured by the institutional complex (UNESCO, ICOMOS, International Center for the Study of Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), the World Bank, and the World Monuments Fund) and consider both its local and global impact.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.707.81 - Reading the Landscape: Cultural Heritage at Scale

    $4085

    Brenda Barrett

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the unique challenges faced by academics and practitioners in defining, preserving and managing rural, natural, and urban heritage at a landscape scale. The multiplicity of interests involved add to the complexity and require robust engagement strategies. Students will use a regional, national and international perspective to derive best practices for understanding the breadth of the cultural landscape concept and the opportunities for its sustainable development. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in the onsite seminar Reading the City (460.704).

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.710.81 - The Protection of Global Cultural Heritage: Laws, Policies, Politics, and Advocacy

    $4085

    Terressa Davis

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will consider the laws, policies, and politics that provide for the public commemoration of tangible and intangible heritage. It will explore ideas related to cultural property across a global and digital landscape including indigenous claims, institutional ownership, and legal rights. Beyond gaining an understanding of applicable laws and policies from a global perspective, students will also examine the politics of heritage and its social and economic impact, including the ways in which it is used in projects of nation building, cultural appropriation, economic development and sustainability, identity, and cultural hegemony. To this end we will take an in depth look at the current threats to world heritage and the laws and policies governing the response of the global community. We will consider what can and cannot, and for that matter what should and should not be done to protect both tangible and intangible world heritage at both the local and international levels and what this means for local and global communities.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.740.81 - Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age

    $4085

    Douglas Pritchard

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    A neolithic settlement in Scotland, at risk due to coastal erosion, is digitally preserved through precise 3D laser scanning; the construction of the massive towers at Cologne Cathedral is brought to life with digital photogrammetry and augmented reality; multilayered cultural heritage information, images, and damage assessments are catalogued in open source databases. These are just a few examples of how a growing number of scholars, researchers, and practitioners are using the latest technology as a means to document, visualize, interpret, and preserve cultural heritage worldwide. This course will explore the ways in which cultural heritage professionals are implementing the latest digital technologies to enhance research, conservation, management and preservation of tangible and intangible heritage, as well as methods of education and engagement for visitors. Through lectures, readings, assignments, and social media, students will identify, analyze and debate the use of documentation, visualization and content creation technology currently being used in the cultural heritage engagement, studies and practice, as well as envision its use for the future.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    460.610.91 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    $4085

    Dina Bailey

    Monday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/12 - 5/7
    Tuesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/6 - 5/1
    Wednesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/7 - 5/2
    Thursday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/8 - 5/3
    Friday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/9 - 5/4

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Field Trip/Seminar Fees: $350.00 ATLANTA SEMINAR, March 12-23, 2018 - Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, one of which must be 460.601 or 460.602, to register for this class. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. This course has a non-refundable $350 fee. If you drop this course, you will be refunded the tuition only, but not the $350 fee. Note that tuition/fees may not appear immediately on your billing statement but the previously stated refund information still applies.

    460.610.92 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    $4085

    Dean Krimmel

    Monday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/12 - 5/7
    Tuesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/6 - 5/1
    Wednesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/7 - 5/2
    Thursday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/8 - 5/3
    Friday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/9 - 5/4

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Field Trip/Seminar Fees: $350.00 BALTIMORE SEMINAR, March 12-23, 2018: Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, one of which must be 460.601 or 460.602, to register for this class. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. This course has a non-refundable $350 fee. If you drop this course, you will be refunded the tuition only, but not the $350 fee. Note that tuition/fees may not appear immediately on your billing statement but the previously stated refund information still applies.

    460.610.93 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    $4085

    -STAFF-

    Monday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/12 - 5/7
    Tuesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/6 - 5/1
    Wednesday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/7 - 5/2
    Thursday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/8 - 5/3
    Friday 8:00 - 5:00; 3/9 - 5/4

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Field Trip/Seminar Fees: $350.00 NEW YORK SEMINAR, March 12-23, 2018: Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, one of which must be 460.601 or 460.602, to register for this class. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. This course has a non-refundable $350 fee. If you drop this course, you will be refunded the tuition only, but not the $350 fee. Note that tuition/fees may not appear immediately on your billing statement but the previously stated refund information still applies.

    460.673.91 - Digital Curation Certificate Internship

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    The internship, including at least 120 hours of field experience, affords students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with experts who are leading digital curation activities in museums and related cultural heritage organizations in the U.S. and abroad. The internship is a partnership between the university and the host institution, and is customized to meet each student’s needs and career goals. The program will assist students in arranging appropriate internships. Student interns will produce evidence of their accomplishments through work products, project reports, or other documentation in an online course component and will participate in online discussion forums with other students enrolled in digital curation internships during the same semester. The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    460.750.91 - Museum Internship

    $4085

    Judith Landau

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    An internship at a student’s local museum, approved by the internship coordinator, may be substituted for one elective course. To fulfill the internship requirement, a student must complete a minimum of 80 hours of work onsite and a project, (either a research paper or a practical product) on an approved topic related to his/her experience, due at the end of the semester. Students also participate in online discussion and course work during the semester. Before registering for the internship option, the student should contact the internship coordinator for approval. At least four to six weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place, the student must submit: 1) a description of the internship weekly duties including activities and/or responsibilities; 2) learning objectives and goals; 3) why this experience should be part of the Museum Studies degree; and 4) a signed letter of commitment from the internship supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

    Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship course.