Course Schedule

To view Center for Advanced Governmental Studies Spring 2017 Schedule, click here.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.601.51 - Climate Change and National Security

    $3783

    Christine Parthemore
    William Rogers

    Thursday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/31 - 12/14

    This course provides an in-depth examination of how the effects of climate change could impact national security, international relations, and global stability. Students will begin by examining and discussing the current body of academic literature. As the semester progresses, students will learn and practice how to use cross-disciplinary resources and tools to envision potential relationships between climate change effects and security outcomes.

    470.602.51 - Government & Politics

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Monday 8:15 - 10:45; 8/28 - 12/11

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    This is a core class for the MA in Government program and an elective for all other programs.

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    John Gans

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/30 - 12/13

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3783

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/28 - 12/11

    o 470.605 Global Political Economy (3 credits) In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    This is a recommended class for Public Management students.

    470.607.51 - Counterintelligence and National Security: 21st Century Challenges

    $3783

    William Nolte

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/31 - 12/14

    Counterintelligence information regarding and operations against foreign intelligence services has always been central to the intelligence process. In many places and at various times, it has been clearly the most significant part of that process. For reasons that will be discussed during the semester, this has not been true in American intelligence for the last half century or so. This class will examine the doctrine and processes of counterintelligence through the 20th century, with the second half of the class pivoting to address the challenges posed by a volatile information and communications environment, a geopolitical environment in which non-states operate as both potential threats and potential partners, and in which insider threats may be as great as those emanating from foreign actors. Finally, the course will address the challenges of operating effective counterintelligence operations in a manner that respects democratic processes and values.

    470.608.51 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/29 - 12/12

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    470.630.51 - Congress and the Making of Foreign Policy

    $3783

    Lester Munson

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/31 - 12/14

    This class will examine the role of Congress in the making of American foreign policy. In particular, this class will discuss the role of Congress in war powers, economic sanctions, human rights advocacy, the approval of international agreements including treaties, international affairs budgets and spending, investigations and oversight of the conduct of foreign policy by the executive branch as well as the impact of Congress on the general direction of American foreign policies and priorities. Special attention will be given to the role of Congress in U.S. policy toward Iran over the past few decades, the use of military force in Iraq and Syria, the role of the legislative branch in U.S policy toward China and Taiwan and the promotion of human rights as a component of American foreign policy. The class will seek to examine the specific actions of Congress on these matters, and their causes and consequences. The class will use books, articles and original source material from committee deliberations and floor action. As we examine these topics, we will come back to larger themes – the balance of power between the executive and legislative branches, the impact of partisan and bureaucratic politics, and the changing role of the United States on the world stage. All this will be discussed with a mind to the role of foreign policy practitioners.

    This course counts towards the Concentrations in Security Studies and Democracy and Governance

    470.632.51 - Security Issues in South Asia

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    The South Asian region, with its complex historical context, a large and diverse population, and contested national borders, especially between nuclearized countries, poses some of the toughest security challenges facing the world. This course highlight salient security challenges in contemporary South Asia, and draws out their implications for U.S. strategic interests in the region. This course examines the sources and implications of the enduring rivalry between nuclearized India and Pakistan, and how it is fueling an ongoing Sino-Indian security competition within the region. Attention is drawn to the sources of militancy in India and in Bangladesh, and to the varied threats to international and regional security due to ongoing conflict in Afghanistan. The Sri Lankan Tamil Tiger insurgency and its eventual defeat in 2009 are be focused upon, alongside some of the climate based threats which no South Asian country is immune, and which also have the potential to exacerbate lingering tensions within the region.

    470.646.51 - Poverty, Inequality, Opportunity: Theoretical Foundations and Policy Implications

    $3783

    John Tambornino

    Thursday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/31 - 12/14

    This course examines enduring issues in political theory – including poverty, inequality, opportunity, citizenship, compassion, obligation, justice, and the role of government, markets, and charity - and their expression in contemporary social policy. The course provides foundations for understanding the theoretical and political dimensions of social policy - and the implications for policy solutions.

    470.650.51 - Legal Issues in Intelligence and National Security

    $3783

    Mark Zaid

    Tuesday 7:30 - 9:00; 8/29 - 12/12

    This class will examine the interplay between the laws and the practices and policies of the United States’ Intelligence Community and national security system, both foreign and domestic. While discussion of the history of intelligence activities and laws dating from the origins of our colonial days will necessarily shape the framework of the class, the focus shall particularly be on current debates and challenges faced by the United States in the 21st Century.

    470.660.51 - Program Evaluation

    $3783

    John Milatzo

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/29 - 12/12

    Program Evaluation is the systematic use of empirical information to assess and improve the efficacy of public or non-profit programs and policies. Evaluation is increasingly required by funders and policy makers concerned with accountability and efficient use of public or philanthropic resources. In addition, many governments and organizations have built the logic of evaluation into their work through systems of performance management and monitoring. This course introduces the student to the literature, theories and approaches to evaluating organizational programs, policies and procedures. Students will acquire a broad perspective on types of program evaluation, including formative and summative evaluation, process evaluation, monitoring of outputs and outcomes, impact assessment, and cost analysis. Students gain practical experience through exercises and assignments involving the design of a conceptual framework, development of indicators, analysis of quantitative and qualitative evaluation data, and development of an evaluation plan to measure impact. In addition, topics such as experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental study designs are introduced in the context of a variety of settings, including schools, welfare agencies, mental health organizations, criminal justice settings, environmental programs, nonprofit organizations, and corporations. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.664.51 - Identity, Insurgency and Civil War in the World System

    $3783

    Michael Vlahos

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/29 - 12/12

    Societies in civil conflict are in crises of legitimacy and authority. Often we call these conflicts insurgency, revolution, or civil war. These terms can be seen as distinct. Insurgency represents an initial conflict phase, in which a competing movement threatens constitutional identity and its ruling order. Revolution establishes an alternative identity and political order. Civil war resolves the crisis of legitimacy and authority. Moreover, they often seamlessly flow together as one phase evolves into another. The course examines a number of past and present civil conflicts around the globe to illuminate larger patterns. It considers the relevance to America's situation today to the path of civil conflict in the Muslim world, post-Communist Europe, and Latin America.

    470.670.51 - The Practice & Politics of U.S. Tax Policy

    $3783

    James Carter

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/28 - 12/11

    Benjamin Franklin famously observed that “nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.” Since Franklin’s day, however, both the form and prevalence of taxation have undergone a dramatic global transformation. This course will review the history of U.S. federal taxation and delve into the practical mechanics of taxation. It will provide students with an understanding of the processes, institutions, and political influences that shape tax policy. Finally, it will examine alternative methods of taxation and consider what the future may hold for federal tax policy. (Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Kevin Woods

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.695.51 - Proseminar: Essentials of Public and Private Management

    $3783

    Thomas Stanton

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/28 - 12/11

    (The purpose of the class is to help equip students to operate effectively in both the public and private sectors. The class will cover three major topics: (1) an overview of managing public and private organizations, with special attention to their differing missions, capabilities, and environments; (2) a survey of important relationships between the public and private sectors; and (3) the need for improved coordination between the public and private sectors to achieve important public purposes. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge in the context of the issues discussed. Students will be expected to complete a significant paper on a relevant topic approved by the instructor. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA program)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA.

    470.745.51 - Terrorist Financing Analysis and Counterterrorist Finance Techniques

    $3783

    Jason Blazakis

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/30 - 12/13

    This course will provide an overview of current issues in the cyber realm, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective. We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. We will analyze the roles of several different types of cyber actors including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector/business responses. This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. A technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

    470.752.51 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3783

    Sarah Beebe

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/30 - 12/13

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems. Prerequisite: One of the following: 470.620 “Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community,” 470.711.51 “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy,” AS.470.748.51 “The Art and Practice of Intelligence,” or permission of instructor.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3783

    Christine Parthemore

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/29 - 12/12

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.797.51 - Introduction to Homeland Security Intelligence

    $3783

    Ronald Marks

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/31 - 12/14

    This course provides students with an intellectual foundation for understanding the concepts underpinning homeland security intelligence, as well as an overview of the US national homeland security framework including organization and policies. It examines the underlying intellectual constructs used to frame the comprehension of security issues, intelligence based on those issues and the development of policies and strategies that lead to implementing programs that protect the United States infrastructure and its people from attack. Over the term, students will be challenged to examine the various paradigms that shape homeland security intelligence and critically apply them to contemporary homeland security challenges and examine how well or poorly these paradigms are reflected in current responses, organizations and policies.

    470.800.51 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3783

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/29 - 12/12

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only after they have completed all other 11 courses required for the degree; although for financial aid reasons, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    470.804.51 - Research and Thesis III (Global Security Studies)/Research Study Seminar

    $3783

    Sarah Clark

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/31 - 12/14

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed both for students who are following the former thesis track and have already passed 470.804 RTI and 470. RT2 (or 470.709), and those students who are taking the new Research Study track and have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods, and 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods. (Students who switched from the old track to the new and have passed RTI and 470.854 are also eligible.) In this class, students on the thesis track will finish the final chapter of their thesis and complete the thesis as a whole, writing an introduction and conclusion that ties together their three chapters. Students in the new Research Study track will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. For both groups, class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis or research study by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.850.51 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    470.860.51 - Capstone for Public Management

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 8:15 - 10:45; 8/29 - 12/12

    This is the final required course in the MA in Public Management program, and students can only take the capstone course in their final semester and after having completed all the other core requirements (Students graduating in the summer semester must take the course in the preceding spring semester). In the semester prior to taking the capstone course and conducting the project, students identify a project topic. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course. To complete the course, students must write a 30- to 35-page capstone paper.

    This is the final requirement for all Public Management students.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $500

    Jennifer Bachner

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 8/28 - 12/16

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    This course is for students who have taken either 470.860 or 470.862 but have not yet completed their final project and need an additional semester.

  • Online Courses

    470.302.81 - Introduction to Graduate Work in Government

    $3783

    Blake Ethridge

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course is an introduction to graduate work and will not count toward your degree, but is designed to help students maximize their performance and excel in graduate studies. The course will combine class work with one-on-one advising and tutoring. The course will cover such topics as research, writing, citation, argument, using evidence, study habits, and managing a graduate-level workload. Teacher and student will meet at the beginning of the semester to assess areas of greatest need and tailor the course to meet them.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.609.81 - Leadership Skills in the 21st Century

    $3783

    Michael Siegel

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will assist leaders in identifying their personal approach to leadership; provide tips on motivating staff by building trusting relationships and shoring up their credibility; suggest influence and persuasion strategies that leaders need to employ when working with bosses, colleagues, direct reports, and critical stakeholders, including funding agencies; develop strategies to build effective work teams; and consider approaches to monitor organizational performance in an ongoing fashion.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.620.81 - Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community

    $3783

    David Murray

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course provides students with an overview of intelligence structures within the Five Eyes community (US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). It covers both foreign and domestic agencies, be they civilian, military or police; HUMINT or SIGINT- enabled; security-intelligence or foreign-intelligence oriented; and tactically or strategically-focused. The course will compare how the various Five Eyes security or intelligence services set priorities and objectives, define national interests (versus shared requirements), develop tactical intelligence, create actionable insights, and how they craft timely and relevant assessments for both domestic and foreign partners. Students are expected to be able to draw conclusions on the value of different types of intelligence, from tactical operations intended to mitigate threat to life cases, to strategic insights relating to proliferation or espionage cases. Upon completing the course, students will understand the dynamics that exist amongst operators and analysts, as well as partners within and outside of the alliance, between domestic intelligence clients and foreign agencies, in regards to sensitive national interests and those of the international partnership.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.623.81 - Nonprofit Program Development and Evaluation

    $3783

    Steven Mayer

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    A(Formerly Program Development & Evaluation in Nonprofits.) A major goal of this course is to help students become more proficient in recognizing, evaluating, and encouraging the kinds of benefits or outcomes intended by our society’s variety of nonprofit and public programs. We will examine what needs and opportunities are addressed by four major types of programs: those serving individuals, those serving communities, those serving networks or systems, and those serving other organizations. Evaluating each requires different lenses and different tools; we will explore the role of culture and context in choosing particular approaches to evaluation. A view of programs as interconnected rather than isolated will be encouraged. A second goal is to help students become more proficient in managing an evaluation process: We will explore purposes and uses of evaluation, the essential elements of an evaluation inquiry, and ways to communicate and use evaluation results. We will explore the variety of quantitative and qualitative strategies useful for evaluating progress in an organization’s attainment of its intended outcomes or benefits. Students can expect to become more proficient in discussing issues of nonprofit and public “program effectiveness,” and strategies for improving nonprofit and public program designs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.641.81 - Introduction to Advocacy and Lobbying

    $3783

    Jason Linde

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Today’s federal reliance on private contractors to perform the basic work of government is neither an accident nor a recent development. It is the predictable and predicted product of a great mid-20th century reform in American government. This course will examine the past and the present of this ongoing reform, place it in historical and comparative (cross-country) perspective, and provide students with an opportunity to consider and debate the paths that Congress, the President and citizens may take to assure that the public interest is served as private actors increasingly perform the work of government.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications

    470.659.81 - Radicalization and Deradicalization in Terror Networks

    $3783

    Shiraz Maher

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will explore some of the most contested and controversial aspects in contemporary security studies. There are a number of contentious and wide-ranging debates around ideas like radicalization not least concerning its definition, causes, and effects. This course will also prompt you to consider broader issues, such as whether there is a causal link between extremism and violent extremism? Why do some radicalized individuals to embrace terrorism, when other don’t? And should security officials concern themselves with radicalization, or only with its violent offshoots? This course will unpack many of these debates, exploring academic and theoretical literature surrounding the issues of radicalization, recruitment, and deradicalization in modern terrorist networks. It will focus primarily on cases in Europe and the United States, while also exploring new phenomena such as homegrown, self-starter, and lone wolf terrorism.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.666.81 - Institutional Fundraising: Raising Maximum Dollars from Government Agencies, Corporations and Foundations

    $3783

    Karen Osborne

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    o In this hands-on course, we’ll help you understand the fundamentals of securing funds from institutional donors. As a staff or board leader of a non-profit, understanding the ins and outs of raising funds for priority projects and capacity building from government agencies, corporations and foundations will add to your toolkit for moving your organization forward. We’ll cover how this aspect of fundraising fits into your overall fundraising strategy and plan. We’ll help you identify the right potential funders for important projects, learn how to land capacity-building funds you can use to grow and sustain your organization, cover the basics of relationship-building with institutional decision-makers, help you use data to build credibility with funders, create pitch-perfect corporate presentations and dive into the process of writing winning proposals and applications. Finally, we’ll cover fulfillment and stewardship. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.682.81 - Mission Meets Profit: Building a Social Enterprise

    $3783

    Lucyna Jodlowska

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    The goal of this course is a comprehensive examination of social enterprises- organizations that, broadly speaking, “apply commercial strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being”. Social enterprises are a relatively new, 21st century phenomenon, and are typically referred to as hybrids of nonprofits and for-profits. While they are similar to nonprofits in that their missions and social and/or environmental objectives drive their very existence, social enterprises can have different structures than traditional 501©3s- some much more complex, legally and otherwise. Throughout the course we will learn about the various types of social enterprises that exist, comparing US models to models operating internationally, and analyze their pros and cons, challenges and opportunities. We will also explore how social enterprises challenge traditional business and nonprofit paradigms, what role social enterprises have come to play in international development, and finally, how to go about developing your own social enterprise. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.693.81 - Comparative Democracies

    $3783

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course uses the comparative method to look at the varieties of democracies that exist today. In the course, we will ask what is democracy, how do we measure it, and how does it vary across space and time? We will look at how democracy manifests in different constitutional forms e.g. parliamentary versus presidential. We will examine how different electoral and party systems influence variation in outcome within the set of democracies, and how social cleavages interact with, and are molded by, these systems. Further, we will use the answers to these questions to explore the issue of democratic consolidation and to ask why some countries become and stay democratic, while others do not. Case studies will be drawn from Europe, Latin America and Asia.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a new course offering that counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.694.81 - Big Data Management Systems

    $3783

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to big data management systems such as the Hadoop system, MongoDB, Amazon AWS, and Microsoft Azure. The course covers the basics of the Apache Hadoop platform and Hadoop ecosystem; the Hadoop distributed file system (HDFS); MapReduce; common big data tools such as Pig (a procedural data processing language for Hadoop parallel computation), Hive (a declarative SQL-like language to handle Hadoop jobs), HBase (the most popular NoSQL database), and YARN. MongoDB is a popular NoSQL database that handles documents in a free schema design, which gives the developer great flexibility to store and use data. We cover aspects of the cloud computing model with respect to virtualization, multitenancy, privacy, security, and cloud data management. Prerequisite: 470.763 Database Management Systems

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.763 Database Management Systems Technology Requirements: A 64-bit computer with a chip that supports virtualization (set via BIOS) Windows Operating System 7, 8, or 10 At least 8 Gb of Physical RAM Oracle VirtualBox version 4.2 (free)

    470.698.81 - American Exceptionalism

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will seek to give students a deeper understanding of where the idea of American exceptionalism comes from and what its implications are for America, both domestically and abroad. Students will gain this understanding from reading classic works in the area that trace America’s political development, starting with its Puritan heritage. Early American works will be studied from this period, along with Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. Seminal works of modern political science scholarship on this question will also be assigned, including works from Seymour Martin Lipset, Louis Hartz, Daniel Boorstin, and others. The course will then extrapolate from these historic roots to contemporary issues of America’s foreign policy and rationale for its foreign interventions. The course will conclude with questions of America’s standing in the world, which has in recent years, declined and seek to understand why this is so and what it means for the future understanding of American exceptionalism.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.701.81 - Congress: Why the First Branch Matters

    $3783

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Congress is the First Branch, “the People’s Branch,” and one of the most powerful legislatures the world has ever known. At this moment in history, however, the people do not assess the institution favorably and political scientists and pundits have declared it the “broken branch.” Is Congress “broken” or merely reflective of our political times? In an era of “unorthodox lawmaking” is a return to “regular order” and “textbook lawmaking” realistic or a fantasy? This course will discuss these questions in the context of the evolving nature of Congress as an institution. The class will examine the institutional development of Congress and explore changes in its representative and legislative functions, as well as constitutional responsibility of holding the “power of the purse.” Congress remains a dynamic institution and it behooves citizens to understand its complexity and centrality to governance in the U.S.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.719.81 - Technical Collection of Intelligence

    $3783

    Robert Clark

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course covers the application of remote sensing technology to intelligence issues to include geospatial intelligence (GEOINT), measurements and signatures intelligence (MASINT) and signals intelligence (SIGINT). It examines the tradeoffs associated with the use of different imaging, radar, and passive radiofrequency sensors and collection platforms. The methods for processing, exploiting and analyzing raw intelligence data collected by different types of sensors are discussed. The final segment of the course investigates the management issues associated with remote sensing in intelligence.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3783

    Karin Orr

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management and a highly recommended class for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management

    470.731.81 - Privacy in a Data-driven Society

    $3783

    Rhea Siers

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will address the legal, policy and cultural issues that challenge the government and its citizens in the increasingly complex technical environment of privacy. We will examine the challenges in balancing the need for information and data against the evolving landscape of individual privacy rights. The course will examine privacy at all levels: by analyzing the shifting views of individual privacy by citizens as well as the technological challenges in both protecting and analyzing personal information for government use. Using case studies and hypotheticals, we will discuss the issue of transparency in the government use and retention of data. Our cases will range from healthcare.gov to “sunshine laws” to national security uses of information. We will trace the development of legal and policy measures relevant to privacy concerns and envision future solutions needed in an era of great technological innovation including the use of “big data”.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.747.81 - Campaigns and Elections

    $3783

    Richard Skinner

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces current theories and controversies concerning political campaigns and elections in the United States. We take advantage of the fact that the class meets during the "invisible primary" of the 2016 presidential campaign, and students are expected to follow journalistic accounts closely. The course is split into two major parts. First, we consider the style and structure of American campaigns. For example, we ask how campaigns have changed in the last fifty years, especially concerning the role of parties, the presence of incumbency advantage, and the role of money. In addition, we consider why candidates decide to run, how they position themselves on important issues, and how they design their campaign messages. We also cover the importance of campaign polling, and the tricky task of forecasting election outcomes. Second, we explore the impact of campaigns on voters. For example, we ask whether campaigns ever convince voters to change their opinion, or whether demographic and socioeconomic factors explain most political behavior. The goal of the course is to review the importance of elections in American politics, and to provide the tools to make normative judgments about the health of American democracy.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.758.81 - Data-Driven Campaigns and Elections

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course examines the ways in which campaigns increasingly rely on data and analytics to inform their voter mobilization and persuasion strategies. Campaigns are leveraging massive databases that contain information on voters’ spending, political engagement and media-consumption habits. Using this information, campaigns make decisions about which television/print ad slots to purchase and which voters to target in get-out-the-vote efforts.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.760.81 - Comparative Intelligence Systems

    $3783

    Mark Stout

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Do all countries conduct their intelligence activities in the same way? If not, what are the reasons for the differences? This class will consider theoretical ways of understanding and assessing national intelligence systems. It will look at political, historical, and cultural factors which may influence the development and functions of nations’ intelligence agencies and systems. The class will include an examination of the "ways of intelligence" of the United States, the United Kingdom, the USSR/Russia, Germany, China, and Iraq, among others.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.769.81 - Data Science for Public Policy

    $3783

    Holly Brasher

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis; this course requires some familiarity with the R programming language and RStudio environment.

    470.769.82 - Data Science for Public Policy

    $3783

    Holly Brasher

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Data science is a methodology for extracting insights from data. This course is an introduction to the concepts and tools that are used in data science with an emphasis on their application to public policy questions. The course covers some advanced data mining and machine learning processes including classification and decision trees, cluster analysis, outlier detection, and text analytics while also providing you with training in the basics of data management and data exploration. All of the work in the course will be conducted to prepare you to proficiently conduct predictive analytics in a real world setting. Some familiarity with R programming language and the RStudio environment is helpful. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3783

    Nancy Hall

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    (This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management and a highly recommended class for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3783

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only after they have completed all other 11 courses required for the degree; although for financial aid reasons, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Jacob Straus

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.851.81 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3783

    Miriam Matthews

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3783

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.854.81 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core requirement for the Public Management program and the Global Security Studies Program.

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    $3783

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods. Note: This course is ONLY for MS in Government Analytics students.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $500

    -STAFF-

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    470.902.81 - Sports Impact Leadership Certificate

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    406.681.81 - Technology of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    $3673

    Charles Blair

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    Students gain the foundational knowledge behind WMD (both weapons of mass destruction and weapons of mass disruption) and about how these weapons threaten U.S. homeland security. Weapons of mass destruction traditionally include nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, while weapons of mass disruption include radiological weapons, such as "dirty bombs." In addition, the course covers the technology behind three WMD delivery vehicles: ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. In assessing each WMD threat, the course first examines the science and technology for each type of weapon and then applies this theory to real world threats emanating from state and non-state actors. Students apply this knowledge by engaging in red team exercises to identify options for preventing and reducing vulnerabilities from WMD. Please note that students do not have to have prior technical knowledge about WMD issues to succeed in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.644.81 - Sustainable Cities

    $3819

    Eileen McGurty

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course examines urbanization and its impacts on the environment. The goal of the course is to better understand how urbanization contributes to ecological damage as well as how cities can be constructed in ecologically healthy ways. Topics include land use planning transportation, waste, management, water quality, open space/greening, green building technology, urban design, and urban ecology. The course takes an international perspective by using case studies of cities in North America, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The case studies also include a wide range of cities with different populations, geographic scale, and growth rates. Final projects are an in-depth study of one particular city of the student's choice and its attempts to implement programs for sustainability. Offered online, annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.646.81 - Transportation Policy and Smart Growth

    $3819

    Christopher Van Wyk

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course examines how transportation policy and decisions can alleviate or prevent problems resulting from urban sprawl. How can transportation decisions and planning contribute to more livable urban design and land use patterns that promote smart growth that is environmentally and ecologically sustainable? Students discuss how different environmental media land, water, and air are affected by our transportation systems and resulting development patterns, and how the design of transportation systems the highways, roads, transit systems, and bike and walk paths can more closely harmonize with nature and provide communities with a better quality of life. A wide range of policy options is examined, from altering the structure of road pricing to redesigning neighborhoods and altering urban form. A number of case studies are examined to illuminate the issues and principles raised in the course. Offered online at least every other year. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.665.81 - Climate Change on the Front Lines: The Study of Adaptation in Developing Countries

    $3819

    Amir Poudel

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    Poor and developing countries are predicted to bear the brunt of climate change. This course will focus on key sectors such as agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, water resources, human health, and tourism and the ways in which poorer and developing counties are impacted by and adapting to climate change. This course may focus on a region or a specific country depending on the instructor. Assessment and evaluation of demographic trends, environmental challenges such as retreating ice, potential flood hazards, ecosystem impacts, as well as health issues will be incorporated. International instruments such as adaptation funds, carbon funds, clean development mechanisms, and reduced deforestation/degradation strategies and policies will be investigated in a comparative analysis of impacts and adaptation responses of countries around the world. Offered online, annually.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.671.81 - Global Land Use Change

    $3819

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course provides a comprehensive examination of global land use change including the current spatial and historical extent of forests and grasslands, methods used to detect forest cover and its current and historical changes. Reviewing these patterns will lead to an understanding of the past and present drivers of land use change. In this course, we will consider the hydrological, and major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus) and the impacts that forests and grasslands (and the loss of these ecosystems) has had on these cycles. The impact of forest loss on biodiversity, long term functioning of ecosystems and climate will also be discussed. After reviewing the effects of a loss of these environmental processes, we will bridge the physical and biological sciences with the social sciences by examining economic impacts and socioeconomic drivers of deforestation. Lastly, current policies and the potential effect of policies that aim to reduce deforestation such as REDD will be discussed.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    425.638.81 - Adaptation to Climate Change

    $3782

    Thomas Peterson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    Global climate change risks are increasingly complex and may ultimately affect virtually every facet of our economic, energy, community, and environmental systems. At the same time, policy and investment responses to climate resiliency needs are similarly complex, controversial, and high stakes. Perhaps no issue facing leaders of today and tomorrow is more cross- cutting in nature or in greater need of improved understanding and capability than climate change risk. This course will provide a comprehensive framework for understanding, assessing, and applying climate change risk, vulnerability, a hazard assessment for the development of risk reduction an adaptation response. In the process, it will examine the status, limitations, and strengths of current assessment and action planning approaches across varying sectors, scales, and impact areas. The course will also include a review of methods prioritizing actions and addressing feasibility, flexibility, and logistical needs as applied to specific facilities, such as military installations, as well broader communities and multistate regions. Individual and group learning exercises will be involved. Offered on-site at least once every two years.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    406.676.51 - The Politics of Cybersecurity

    $3673

    James Norton

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/31 - 12/14

    In recent years, the United States has become dependent on cyber virtual networks as the engine for our society. However, this digital infrastructure remains extremely vulnerable to cyber attacks. Protecting the networks we rely on presents unique challenges, as networks are without borders and bear the stress of attack millions of times each day. This course will explore the challenges and political factors impacting the judicial, legislative, executive branch agencies of Department of Defense, Homeland Security, National Security Agency, and private industry as they all work to secure and create a national cyber security apparatus. The intelligence community is facing an enormous challenge in working to prevent the transfer of the United States’ intellectual property and identifying the cyber attackers. We will discuss the political implications of establishing laws addressing how information is to be shared between governments and industry and the authorities needed for the DoD and intelligence community to operate domestically. We will discuss the impact of the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and examine the evolving relationship of Congressional oversight and legislative mandates. Issues such as jurisdiction of congressional committees, the budget, and the authorization and appropriations processes will be covered. Major policy and counter-terrorism issues of special concern to Congress will also be addressed in this course. Guest speakers will be invited from DHS, Capitol Hill and the media, allowing us to examine the issues from a variety or perspectives.

    406.680.51 - The Impact of Science on National Security

    $3673

    Leonard Buckley

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    This survey course will explore the role of science and technology in the national security of our Nation. The focus will be on how science directly impacts nation security. The Federal role in funding science and technology along with a description of the Federal Laboratory system will be discussed. A high level view of the physics and chemistry behind various national security issues will be presented. These issues will include situations involving chemical, biological and explosive compounds and the science behind the tasks of sensing and protection involving these threats. The science and engineering behind the topics such as remote sensing, unmanned vehicles, autonomy, energy, climate change, and genome engineering will also be addressed. The course will be conducted in a part lecture/part discussion format.

    420.612.51 - Sustainability Science: Concepts and Challenges

    $3819

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/28 - 12/11

    Sustainability Science is an interdisciplinary field engaged with understanding the dynamics between natural and social systems and how those interactions challenge the notion of sustainability. This course will start by reviewing the history of the concept of sustainability and will then consider how it has been applied in the environmental sciences. Specifically the goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perspective on this emerging field, understanding its theory, research horizons, and practical applications. Concepts to be reviewed include socio-environmental systems, complex adaptive systems, cross-scalar impacts, tipping points and regime shifts, vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity, equity, sustainable development, political ecology, governance, capital assets and livelihoods. In a seminar context this course will consider these and other concepts from a theoretical perspective but will focus on their application in solving real-world problems. Offered on-site, infrequently.

    There is a field trip fee of $100.00.

    425.603.51 - Climate Change Policy Analysis

    $3782

    -STAFF-

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/29 - 12/12

    After a study of the historical development of climate change policy, this course analyzes current policy options for mitigate for and adapting to long-term climate change. The course will examine various approaches available in the U.S. for national-level policy, including the regulatory approach and the market-based approaches, particularly cap and trade and carbon taxation. Various models for designing a cap and trade system will be studied, including the European experience and regional programs in the United States. Special attention will be paid to methods for setting initial prices and accounting for discounts. The course will focus primarily on national-level carbon management policies, but international agreements w also be included, as well as equity considerations on a global le Offered online or on-site twice per year.