Course Schedule

For Spring 2018, the following Geographic Information Systems courses count toward your program. Please take note of the prerequisites for these courses as well as the technology requirements. Most of the GIS software runs on Windows. If you’re using a Mac, your computer must be able to simulate Windows. More information can be found here.

Please note that the MS in Government Analytics is an interdisciplinary program. If there is a course offered through Johns Hopkins that you would like to apply to your program but is not listed below, contact Dr. Bachner to determine if the course is indeed appropriate and to secure approval.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)
SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Government Analytics courses.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    John Gans

    Monday 7:15 - 9:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3783

    Marco Zambotti

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/8 - 4/30

    o 470.605 Global Political Economy (3 credits) In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    470.612.51 - Bureaucratic Politics

    $3783

    Ken Masugi

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/11 - 4/26

    This seminar will examine the political support for bureaucracy, how bureaucracy functions in contemporary government and society, and selected current controversies over the purpose and reach of bureaucracy. How does bureaucracy enhance or frustrate liberal democratic ideals? We will take up case studies involving current political issues, such as civil rights enforcement, the war on terror, the role of regulatory agencies, judicial policymaking, relevant student experiences, and the instructor's own experience in various federal and state agencies.

    This class counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Government

    470.613.51 - Managing Risk and Performance: Improving Decisionmaking in Government Agencies

    $3783

    Thomas Stanton

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/10 - 4/25

    The United States has experienced the most significant failure of its financial system since the Great Depression. Differences in governance and management between the survivors and the others are instructive not only for financial firms, but for government agencies and private companies in other sectors of the economy. This course seeks to present learnings that are potentially relevant to government managers and organizations. The basic lesson, of course, is that low probability events with devastating consequences do happen. Nicolas Nassim Taleb (2007) calls such events “black swans.” He argues that they take place much more frequently than people expect. Managers must take the possibility of black swans into account even when times are good; that’s one factor that distinguishes the survivors from the rest. The federal government and private sector have learned this from Katrina, the massive 2010 Gulf oil spill, homeland security events such as September 11, and the Great Recession that emerged from the financial crisis. All of these occurred within a single decade. Students will be expected to produce a research paper on an approved topic relating to (1) a crosscutting theme of governance and risk management at one or more private companies, (2) government regulation and supervision of risk management at one or more private companies, or (3) a cross-cutting theme of governance and risk management at government agencies. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge of successes and failures of governance and risk management. The syllabus can be accessed from the Governmental Studies course descriptions webpage.

    470.627.51 - Financial Management & Analysis in the Public Sector

    $3783

    Eric Litton

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/11 - 4/26

    The primary emphasis of this class will be to teach students how to make more informed business decisions through the use of financial management accounting information. Management accounting is concerned with the information provided managers to plan, manage control, and assess an entity’s activities and performance. Managerial accounting concepts are universal and can be applied to service, government, and nonprofit organizations. This class assumes no formal exposure to management accounting (or financial accounting, for that matter) and as such will focus on how to organize and use information to run/measure/operate a public entity or program. (Core course for the MA in Public Management. This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration. Elective option for Government Analytics students)

    This is a core course for the MA in Public Management program.

    470.631.51 - Economics for Public Decision-Making

    $3783

    Marc Goldwein

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/10 - 4/25

    Economic thinking provides an important set of tools for almost every aspect of public policymaking. This course aims to offer students a basic understanding of economics and its importance in public policymaking. The first half of the course will offer students an understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, including a discussion of when markets can work to achieve policy goals and when “market failures” call for government intervention. The second half of the class will use these economic tools and theories in order to survey several specific policy areas, including health policy, tax policy, and the national debt. (Core course for the MA in Public Management This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration (GSS). Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    This is a core course for students in the Public Management program.

    470.654.51 - Deterrence in the 21st Century

    $3783

    Donald Laird

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course will comprise a comprehensive examination of what deterrence is and what it will require in the 21st century. It will seek to grapple with and provide insights on a range of fundamental questions of theoretical and policy import including, What comprises deterrence in the years ahead?; How should decision makers understand the many new relevant domains and capabilities (not just nuclear, but space, cyber, missile defenses, advanced conventional) in which deterrence issues and concerns may well have to be paramount in their minds?; What are the roles and requirements of extended deterrence in the emerging geopolitical environment?; How might deterrence come to play in emerging areas such as hybrid warfare?; How might deterrence fail?; and What are the intentional and unintentional escalation paths and dynamics, including cross-domain dynamics, likely to be at work in crises and conflicts ahead?

    470.657.51 - Energy, Security, and Defense

    $3783

    Oliver Fritz

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/11 - 4/26

    This course is a seminar-based overview of the role of energy in national security. Using a range of U.S. and non-U.S. case studies, students will review the roles of energy in grand strategy, the role of energy in conflict, and, finally, as a logistical enabler of military operations.

    470.665.51 - Covert Action and National Security

    $3783

    John Sano

    Tuesday 6:15 - 8:45; 1/9 - 4/24

    Covert action (CA) remains a highly controversial and generally misunderstood element within the Intelligence Community. Title 50 of the United States Code defines Covert Action as: “…an activity or activities of the United States Government to influence political, economic, or military conditions abroad, where it is intended that the role of the United States Government will not be apparent or acknowledged publicly.” Lying somewhere between overt diplomatic initiatives and direct military intervention, CA is often referred to as the “third option” when addressing foreign policy issues that impact on U.S. national security interests. Through selected case studies, we will review the mechanisms by which CA is initiated, managed and executed – determining what CA can and equally important, cannot accomplish. We will also see how CA, as conducted by the CIA, is often used in a dual track program alongside State Department initiatives in an effort to resolve particularly difficult foreign policy dilemmas. CA is not unique to the U.S., and is often employed by other countries as well. Whether Russian “active measures,” or French “direct action,” variants of CA continue to form an integral, albeit highly secretive, element of statecraft.

    470.667.51 - Machine Learning and Neural Networks

    $3783

    Mahmoud Lababidi

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/11 - 4/26

    Machine learning and, more broadly, artificial intelligence, has recently had a series of unprecedented successes in performing tasks such as image recognition and autonomously playing video games at a higher level of accuracy and performance than humans. These successes are driven by accelerated developments in machine learning, notably neural networks. This course covers a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis This course will cover a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Students are REQUIRED to bring a laptop to class; the laptop should be a PC or Mac laptop (not chromebook) with 4GB RAM (preferably 8GB) minimum. Please contact the instructor with questions.

    470.678.51 - National Security Leadership

    $3783

    Stephen Duncan

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:30; 1/10 - 4/25

    This course analyzes the civilian and military leadership of the principal departments and agencies of the government which are responsible for the nation's security. Attention will be placed upon the problems with which civilian (senior and mid-level political appointees, Civil Service) and military leaders are currently dealing, the processes through which they are selected and evaluated, culture and competence clashes, the inevitable tension in the civil-military relationship, and efforts to improve professionalism in a rapidly changing security environment. An important objective is to improve the critical thinking skills of the students and to inform them on the political, operational, budgetary, legal, and other factors which influence senior officials in the making of defense/homeland security strategies and policies and on the decision-making methodologies employed.

    470.680.51 - The Rise and Fall of Intelligence

    $3783

    Michael Warner

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course emphasizes recent changes in US intelligence and assesses the ways in which persistent and emerging issues in the field are helping or hindering the United States in achieving policy objectives. The goal is to provide answers to three questions: "How does US intelligence work in the modern world?"; "What are the larger dilemmas facing US intelligence overseers and those who use intelligence?"; and “How are these realities likely to shape the future of the Intelligence Community?” The approach will be both historical and topical. The history of intelligence offers a surprising number of illustrative cases and themes—many of which can now be examined in detail using official records and contrarian views, and can even be compared with analogues across nations and time periods. More-recent events are not as well documented in the public, official record, of course, but an understanding of earlier patterns and activities can provide valid insights on contemporary trends. The trends identified in the past and the present will then be explored for their ramifications for the future.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Michael Vlahos

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/11 - 4/26

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.695.51 - Proseminar: Essentials of Public and Private Management

    $3783

    Thomas Stanton

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:00; 1/2 - 1/16
    Thursday 5:45 - 8:00; 1/4 - 1/18
    Saturday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/6 - 1/20

    (The purpose of the class is to help equip students to operate effectively in both the public and private sectors. The class will cover three major topics: (1) an overview of managing public and private organizations, with special attention to their differing missions, capabilities, and environments; (2) a survey of important relationships between the public and private sectors; and (3) the need for improved coordination between the public and private sectors to achieve important public purposes. Students will be encouraged to make the course an interactive one and to share their personal knowledge in the context of the issues discussed. Students will be expected to complete a significant paper on a relevant topic approved by the instructor. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Government/MBA program)

    This is a core course for the Public Management program and the MA in Government/MBA dual degree program. This course is also an intersession class.

    470.696.51 - Ethics and Privacy in Intelligence Operations

    $3783

    Rhea Siers

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course will address the ethical dilemmas and privacy issues that challenge intelligence and government decision makers in an increasingly complex operational and technological environment. We will examine basic moral, ethical and privacy considerations from all sides at several key points in intelligence operations from collection to covert action. The course will analyze the evolving nature of privacy concerns worldwide, with an emphasis on the balance between individual rights and national security needs as executed by intelligence agencies. Students will examine the policy implications inherent in seeking to address these issues. The readings will include diverse and opposing viewpoints as well as practicums and simulations to allow debate of the key positions in "real world" situations. Prior enrollment in 406.665 "The Art and Practice of Intelligence" or 470.711 "Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy" is strongly encouraged.

    470.711.51 - Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy

    $3783

    Mark Lowenthal

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the role that intelligence plays in the formation of national security policy. The course explores the forces and events that have shaped U.S. intelligence. It examines the steps involved in producing intelligence from requirements through collection, analysis and the actual making of policy. The role of intelligence in the major intelligence issues facing the United States today will be discussed as well. The main text for the course will be Dr. Lowenthal’s book of the same title published by CQ Press which has been called the “best introduction to the role of the U.S. intelligence community in the national security policy-making process.”

    470.735.51 - Politics and the Media

    $3783

    Matthew Laslo

    Monday 5:45 - 8:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    Quickly accelerating changes in the ways we get our news are compelling newsmakers and journalists alike to rethink their craft, and their relationships with their audiences, with repercussions for policy, politics and public discourse. This course will examine how innovations – like social networking, mobile platforms, behavioral targeting, etc --are providing journalists and political leaders with new ways to interact with citizens. It will look at how the rapid migration of consumers to the web is leading news organizations of all types to rethink how they organize, pay for and think about themselves. Students in this course will use real time news developments in the nation’s capital as a laboratory for observing the evolving ways news sources and reporters and the public interact. Questions to be considered include whether this digitized and networked environment has implications for the pace and character of changes in public policy. The course will invite practitioners in journalism and politics who are dealing with these developments daily to share their sense of where all this is leading. This course counts towards the Political Communication Concentration.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications

    470.766.51 - Economic Growth:The Politics of Development in Asia, Africa and Beyond

    $3783

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/8 - 4/30

    What makes some countries grow while others do not? What accounts for successful economic development versus stagnation? As these questions become ever more relevant in an increasingly globalized world, this course offers an introduction to the topic. The class will provide an overview of the main classic and current theories of economic development. It will then go on to explore specific current issues in development, including: development aid, role of international organizations, sustainable development, corruption, institution building and regime type. Specific case studies will be examined including China and India, the East Asian ‘tigers’, development failures in Africa and mixed outcomes in Latin America.

    470.830.51 - Practicum in Government & Politics

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 1/8 - 4/30

    One of the great strengths of the Government Program is that it brings theory and practice together, and recognizes that it is often from work experience that students gather useful and practical insights and information that can be applied to academic work. This course is designed for students who have an internship or who work in a field that will allow them to use that work experience to conduct research that may be applied to their theses. Permission of instructor is required.

    Only by permission of the instructor may a student register for Practicum.

    470.851.51 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3783

    Christina Lai

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/10 - 4/25

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    470.854.51 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Matthew Eckel

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 1/10 - 4/25

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    This is a core course for the Public Management program and meets one of the research course requirements for the Global Security Studies program.

    470.855.51 - Research Study Seminar

    $3783

    Sarah Clark

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/11 - 5/3

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.860.51 - Capstone for Public Management

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/9 - 5/1

    This is the final required course in the MA in Public Management program, and students can only take the capstone course in their final semester and after having completed all the other core requirements (Students graduating in the summer semester must take the course in the preceding spring semester). In the semester prior to taking the capstone course and conducting the project, students identify a project topic. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course. To complete the course, students must write a 30- to 35-page capstone paper.

    This is a core requirement for Public Management students and must be taken in the last semester before graduating. Students who intend to graduate in the summer of 2018 should take Capstone in the Spring of 2018.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course is for students in the Public Management and Government Analytics programs who have not yet completed their capstone project. Students who have not yet completed their capstone must sign up for this course.

  • Online Courses

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3783

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.602.82 - Government & Politics

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Online 1/8 - 5/7

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.603.82 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    John Gans

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.605.81 - Global Political Economy

    $3783

    Charles Larkin

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    o 470.605 Global Political Economy (3 credits) In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.608.81 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the Public Management program.

    470.608.82 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3783

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.611.81 - Introduction to Terrorism Studies

    $3783

    Elena Mastors

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provide an overview of the principal areas important to the study of terrorism. The course offers a variety of academic, policy, and operational models, theories, approaches, and concepts regarding the definitions of terrorism, the nature and functioning of various terrorist groups across the globe, and a variety of domestic and international governmental operational and policy responses. Through this exploration, students will be able to identify patterns of behavior of both terrorist groups and governmental responses, and will also be able to identify gaps, and principal areas of improvements in how we understand, and respond to this important security challenge.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.616.81 - Political Ideas, Strategy, and Policy Implementation

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    It is easy, in this age of reactive 24-hour news, to believe that ideas no longer matter in politics. But ideas are the currency of politics, and are central to both campaigning and governing. What candidates stand for matters, and the best policy is the best politics. This class will discuss the critical role ideas play in our American political system. It will examine how ideas define candidates and governments, shape political strategies, and form campaign communications. But, most importantly, it will discuss how campaigning on ideas leads to successful governing. While compromise and negotiation are often derided as weaknesses in today’s political system, we will examine how these techniques have been used to implement policy ideas and further political strategy. From the practical perspective of the instructor’s own legislative and political experience, the class will take up case studies involving the interplay between politics and ideas in recent history in areas such as budget reform, national security, tax reform, crime prevention, trade, and poverty. Through these case studies, we will look at how and why policy ideas succeeded or failed through the lens of elections, political communications, and their positive impact on the public.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a new course offering that counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration.

    470.622.81 - Money and Politics

    $3783

    Richard Skinner

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course considers the historical and contemporary relationship between money and government. In what ways do moneyed interests have distinctive influences on American politics? Does this threaten the vibrancy of our representative democracy? Are recent controversies over campaign finance reform and lobbying reform signs that American government is in trouble? This course is reading, writing, and discussion intensive, and we consider the large academic literature on this subject, as well as the reflections of journalists and political practitioners. Election law and regulations on money in politics are always changing, and so part of the course is designed to give students tools at tracking these developments. The overall goal of the course is to foster an understanding of the money/politics relationship in ways that facilitate the evaluation of American democracy.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications

    470.624.81 - Health Care Analytics and Policy

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course covers the ways in which analytics are being used in the healthcare industry. Topics include data collection opportunities created by the ACA and other laws, the use of analytics to prevent fraud, the use of predictive modeling based on medical records, the insurance industry's increasing use of data and the ethical issues raised by these practices.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.651.81 - Corruption and Democratic Governance

    $3783

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Corruption is ubiquitous. It is a universal phenomenon that has always been around and that can be found almost anywhere. Recent years have seen much focus on the relationship between it and democratic governance. Indeed corruption and politics more generally, are inextricably and universally entwined. In this seminar we will take an in-depth look at the relationship between the two. We will ask: What is Corruption? Is it always the same thing everywhere, or does it vary depending on context or place? Do pork barrel politics and political clientelism count as corruption? What are the implications of corruption? Is it necessarily always a bad thing or can it be beneficial? Is the corruption experienced in developed countries qualitatively different from that in developing ones such that democracy suffers more in developing countries? We will seek to answer these and other questions by taking a critical look at the politics of corruption. We will look at the origins, extent, character and significance of corruption from both a developed and developing country perspective. We will cover various theories relating to corruption as well as look at a number of empirical cases.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.658.81 - Religion and American Political Culture

    $3783

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The relationship between religion and politics in the American context is one of peculiar complexity in the American context. This course has 3 main objectives: 1) to examine in general terms the role of religion in American public and political life as reflected in the debates concerning the use of religious symbolism and discourse in the public sphere; 2) to analyze how religiously informed moral argument has helped to shape public debate on key issues of public policy including the issues of civil rights, abortion, war and peace, and economic policy; and 3) to provide the necessary historical and philosophical context to help understand the present day intersection of religion and politics, and to see how previous generations of Americans approached similar problems.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance.

    470.671.81 - Risk Management in the Public Sector

    $3783

    William Spinard

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The demand for robust and resilient risk management practices is increasing in the public sector as organizations continue to struggle with explicitly integrating risks into their executive decision making processes. OMB’s recent revision of A-123 places additional pressure on this imperative. The objective of this course is to introduce students to fundamental risk management and measurement practices and demonstrate their relevance to the government sector. It will help students understand risk management principles and practices and how they might apply to their organization. The goal is to give students a comprehensive view of both the risk management processes and some of the key measurement tools for understanding and mitigating operational, credit, market and enterprise risks exposures.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods. If you’ve taken a different statistics course, check with the instructor prior to enrolling. Important Note: This course requires that students use Excel (on their personal computer) and purchase @Risk software (approx. $50).

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3783

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.688.81 - Political Institutions and the Policy Process

    $3783

    Douglas Harris

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Bridging the divide between political science theories of policymaking and the actual workings of the policy process in the institutions of national government, this course examines the individual contributions of each of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as well as the interactions and struggles between those branches. How do these various institutions set the policy agenda, develop and deliberate policy alternatives, make authoritative policy decisions, and implement those decisions? In what ways are the interactions between these institutions best considered conflict or cooperation? Also, how do outside actors and institutions -- the media, interest groups, public opinion, parties and campaigns -- affect policymaking in these various institutional settings? Drawing on the Constitutional design and historical development of these institutions as well as contemporary practice, this course examines the purposes, processes, and outcomes of policymaking from an institutional perspective.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.689.81 - NGOs in Development and Global Policy-Making

    $3783

    Laura Roper

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Formerly Overview of Global Public and Nonprofit Relationship). This course provides an overview of the role of both national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in processes of development, humanitarian response, and the promotion of human rights and active citizenship. The last decade has been one of rapid change in which NGO relationships with government, the private sector, and donors has been in a state of flux, with unprecedented challenges raised about the legitimacy and effectiveness of NGO actors. The course will look at how systemic changes the evolution of transnational advocacy, the aid effectiveness process, the emergence of new development actors from countries (such as India, China and Brazil) to the primacy of the private sector has influenced NGOs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Mark Stout

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.692.82 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Mark Stout

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.699.81 - Applied Performance Analytics

    $3783

    Carter Hewgley

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Data are everywhere, and many elected officials and government managers understand they need it. But how can they use data to solve problems and shape policy? What is the best way to make decisions based on a data analysis? How do you communicate those decisions, and the rationale behind them, to employees, citizens and stakeholders? This course provides students with an experiential learning opportunity based on a real-world scenario. Students begin by studying foundational concepts and techniques of data collection, analytics, and decision support. They also learn how to navigate multiple interests, asymmetrical information, and competing political agendas as they make difficult decisions about resource allocation and public policy. Along the way, they learn how to turn insights into action by effectively communicating the results of analysis to busy executives and decision makers at all levels of the organization. Their work culminates in a showcase event where the class presents their recommended solutions to government practitioners, who review and critique their proposal.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Students will be REQUIRED to use Excel in the course; the instructor strongly recommends that students have a working knowledge of Excel. Students should be able to execute all of the following functions in Excel: sorting, filtering, pivoting, and making a chart. Recommended prerequisite: Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.704.81 - Strategies in Insurgent and Asymmetric Warfare

    $3783

    Stephen Grenier

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This class examines the phenomenon of irregular warfare—of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies in particular—through a historical lens. The course will give you students insight into the origins, objectives, strategies, and tactics of irregular wars, as well as the principles of counterinsurgency theory and practice. Through the course, you will analyze current irregular wars, understand what caused them and whether they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful, and see how they can be combated.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3783

    Leana Bowman

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management. Students in the Nonprofit Management program are strongly encouraged to take this course.

    470.740.81 - Cyber Policy, Strategy, Conflict and Deterrence

    $3783

    Rhea Siers

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will provide an overview of current issues in the cyber realm, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective. We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. We will analyze the roles of several different types of cyber actors including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector/business responses. This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. A technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.743.81 - Data Mining and Predictive Analytics

    $3783

    Nicole Alioto

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Many government agencies engage in data mining to detect unforeseen patterns and advanced analytics, such as classification techniques, to predict future outcomes. In this course, students will utilize IBM SPSS Modeler to investigate patterns and derive predictions in areas such as fraud, healthcare, fundraising, human resources and others. In addition, students will learn to build segmentation models using clustering techniques in an applied manner. Integration with other statistical tools and visualization options will be discussed. Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisites: 470.681 Statistics and Policy Analysis and 470.709 Quantitative Methods. Students will be REQUIRED to purchase the student version of SPSS Modeler to complete the course.

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 1/8 - 5/7

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.751.81 - Politics and Security in the MIddle East

    $3783

    Bryan Gibson

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will examine U.S. policy responses to the changing political and security landscape of the Middle East. Bringing together historical events, primary sources and secondary literature and contextual analysis, this course will provide the necessary analytical skills required to develop a sophisticated understanding of the current political and security situation in the Middle East. Each module, students will engage key topics in modern Middle Eastern politics and security, including the origins of Islam, Arab nationalism and its rise to prominence, the Arab-Israeli and Palestinian-Israeli conflicts, the internal/external struggles against Western imperialism, the competition among Arab states for regional dominance, the Cold War the Middle East, America’s relations with Iran and Iraq, the oil economy of the Gulf, the challenge minorities pose to the region, the rise of Islamic radicalism, the Arab Spring, and the rise of the Islamic State.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.752.81 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems. Prerequisite: One of the following: 470.620 “Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community,” 470.711.51 “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy,” AS.470.748.51 “The Art and Practice of Intelligence,” or permission of instructor.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.763.81 - Database Management Systems

    $3783

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides students with a strong foundation in database architecture and database management systems. The principles and methodologies of database design, and techniques for database application development are evaluated. The current trends in modern database technologies such as Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), NoSQL Databases Cloud Databases, and Graph Databases are examined.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.773.81 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3783

    Chad Briggs

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.789.81 - International/Non-Governmental Organizations and Civil Society in Conflict Zones

    $3783

    Karin Orr

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Since the end of the Cold War the world has seen a scourge of civil conflicts emerging across the globe, such as in Bosnia, Rwanda, Darfur, DRC, South Sudan, and now Syria, global conflicts have put enormous pressure on intergovernmental bodies and governments. Whether too slow to respond, afflicted by political restraints or hindered by bureaucracy, the restrictions on international agencies and governments have often placed NGOs at the fore of response. Partnering with both national governments, military, and international agencies, NGOs have gained recognition for their role in diplomacy, conflict resolution, and peacebuilding. NGOs have gained a prominent role at helping to defuse, mitigate, and prevent conflicts strengthening their influence and recognition. This course will provide an overview on the role that international organizations and civil society (including community based organizations) can have in conflict or post-conflict torn countries. Students will learn how to build strategic partnerships when working with local organizations and NGOs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3783

    Nancy Hall

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the Public Management program.

    470.798.82 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3783

    Lucyna Jodlowska

    Online 1/8 - 5/7

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the Public Management program.

    470.799.81 - State Politics: A Year in the Life

    $3783

    Pamela Prah

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    In this course, each student will be assigned to track a particular state as new legislative sessions begin. During the semester, students will examine the key issues that the legislatures, governors and other branches of state government take up and how social issues, budgets and other challenges are met. Students will explore what makes a state “red” or “blue” and what it means for citizens in those states. Of particular interest are states with governors and other state officials who may have aspirations for the White House and states with new political leaders elected the previous fall.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 The course counts towards the Democracy Studies and Governance Concentration.

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3783

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course only after they have completed all other 11 courses required for the degree; although for financial aid reasons, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Jacob Straus

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.850.82 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3783

    Shawn Reese

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: 175.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3783

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.853.81 - Historical Methods

    $3783

    Jason Ridler

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Historians reclaim, recover, and revise what we know about the past. They enter a dialog with the dead to make sense of our world for the living, knowing full well that their hard-earned results may be overturned with new data, analysis, or insights. Yet questionable or flawed “history” is routinely to justify a range of experiences, policies, and events. In this course, we instill the key skills and analytical framework in which historians use to uncover and recreate the past, taking the journey from question, to research (onsite and online), to argument and revision (and revisionism). The importance of argument, objectivity, personal and temporal bias, evidence, narrative and cultural context are examined in detail, along with case studies of history being used, misused, and abused by historians and other actors.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.854.81 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the Public Management program and meets one of the research course requirements for the Global Security Studies program.

    470.854.82 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3783

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This is a core course for the Public Management program and meets one of the research course requirements for the Global Security Studies program.

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    $3783

    Holly Brasher

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 This course is ONLY for Government Analytics students who are in their last or next-to-last semester.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $500

    -STAFF-

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    470.901.81 - Performance Analytics: Tools and Techniques

    $3783

    Andrew Nicklin
    Eric Reese

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will enable participants to: 1) launch a sustainable open data program that increases transparency and public engagement; and 2) leverage data to improve performance-based management with an emphasis on budget, operational, and policy decision making. During the course, participants will receive feedback on the strategies they developed.

    This is an executive education course. If you are an AAP student, please do not register for the course. It does not count toward any AAP academic program.

    470.903.81 - Launching Open Data

    $3783

    Eric Reese

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Municipalities across the United States are increasingly using data and evidence to improve the delivery of services for residents. As part of this transformation, governments are increasing the availability of raw data to the public. To do this, civil servants need to refine their data skills and develop new collaborative approaches to tackling some of our most persistent problems. Drawing on best practices from successful Open Data programs, students will create strategies to strengthen their Open Data policies. They will learn how to evaluate Open Data platforms and engage residents in the use and analysis of public data. Most importantly, they will be able to effectively manage Open Data programs within government organizations.

    Please note that this is a non-credit course. It does not count toward any AAP program.

    470.904.81 - Community Engagement: Tools and Techniques for Making Meaningful Connections

    $3783

    Eric Reese

    Online 1/8 - 5/7

    “Community engagement” is prized as both a key incentive for and desired outcome of open data and digital government services. However, all too often, the skills, strategies, and activities necessary to develop meaningful community engagement are deprioritized at best or go unrecognized at worst, leaving civil servants scrambling to activate constituents with little time, resources, or capacity. This online course, developed by the Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University, is a bootcamp designed to introduce and level up essential engagement planning, outreach, and organizing skills, and apply them to a real-world initiative of your choosing. Drawing on best practices in multiple sectors, we’ll delve into the art and science of mobilizing diverse communities, crafting lasting partnerships, and telling the story of our work. Although framed around data and digital initiatives, the skills and strategies learned here can be broadly applied to other government programs as well. Experience working for state or local government strongly recommended, but not required for this course.

    Please note that this is a non-credit course. It does not count toward any AAP program.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    406.661.81 - Technology and Terrorism

    $3673

    Charles Blair

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course explores the phenomenon of terrorism and its nexus with technology. Beginning with an emphasis on terrorist group factors most likely to influence terrorists’ perceptions and attitudes towards extant and emerging technologies, the course subsequently investigates cases of terrorist use, and noteworthy non-use, of various technologies. Students also receive a broad understanding of the evolution of technology with an emphasis on current and imminent technologies of acute security concern, including weapons of mass destruction, cyber, robotics, and nanotechnologies. The course then addresses counterterrorism technologies and potential terrorist response actions for overcoming such security efforts. Students operationalize all of these elements in the final phases of the course when engaging in Red Team exercises designed to demonstrate which types of terrorists are most likely to pursue certain types of technologies, the role of tacit versus explicit knowledge, likelihood of successful adoption, targeting options, and potential counterterrorism measures. Please note that students do not need to possess a technical background or prior knowledge of terrorism to succeed in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    406.663.81 - Defense Policy

    $3673

    Robert Haffa

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course describes the principal challenges facing the making of American Defense Policy and explains previous and current policies declared and practiced to meet them. The course is designed to inform students on the most pressing defense issues confronting the United States, and to present them a framework for defense policy analysis. It emphasizes understanding those defense policies, analyzing them, and considering and weighing alternative approaches to achieving national objectives of deterrence and defense. The course fosters an understanding of the array of U.S. military capabilities providing plausible responses to the use of military power in support of U.S. foreign policy objectives. It examines those policies in the areas of nuclear, conventional, and irregular forces, and weighs alternatives in shaping the size and structure of those forces to meet national objectives.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    406.682.51 - Nuclear Proliferation and Nonproliferation

    $3673

    Peter Almquist

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 1/10 - 5/2

    Since 1945, eight states have tested nuclear weapons, and perhaps two dozen others have started -- and stopped – nuclear weapons programs. This course considers why some countries pursue nuclear weapons and why others forgo them – an issue that bedevils both policymakers, concerned about the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and political scientists, attempting to explain and predict it. The class will delve into past and present examples, discussing and evaluating theories of why states pursue such weapons, the technologies that make it possible, and the policy tools available to prevent it. We will also draw on the parallel efforts to control chemical weapons, biological weapons, and ballistic missiles.