Course Schedule

SwatchforWeb  Courses that are highlighted are Global Security Courses. (Courses without highlighting are Governmental Studies courses offered over the same term. For requirements about Government Studies courses applying as electives, please visit the Degree Requirements page.)

  • To view Government and Public Management course offerings that can count toward the MA in Global Security Studies, please click here.
  • To view Science, Technology, and International Security course offerings that can count toward the MA in Global Security Studies, please click here.
  • Global Security Studies students may also enroll in 430.601 – Geographic Information Systems and 430.602 – Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications for credit, with instructor permission. For more information, please visit the GIS Course Schedule page.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Washington DC Center

    470.601.51 - Climate Change and National Security

    $3897

    Christine Parthemore
    William Rogers

    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This course provides an in-depth examination of how the effects of climate change could impact national security, international relations, and global stability. Students will begin by examining and discussing the current body of academic literature. As the semester progresses, students will learn and practice how to use cross-disciplinary resources and tools to envision potential relationships between climate change effects and security outcomes.

    470.602.51 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/11 - 12/18

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    This class is an onsite class that can be taken as a videoconference course for those students not in DC. You will login to an adobe classroom link provided by the professor on Tuesdays at 6:00 EST starting on September 11. You will be able to participate fully in the class discussions and interact with students on and offsite and with the professor.

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    Donald Laird

    Thursday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/6 - 12/13

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3897

    Katrina Kosec

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 9/6 - 12/13

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty, and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies. Recommended elective for MA in Public Management)

    This is a recommended elective for MA in Public Management students.

    470.607.51 - Counterintelligence and National Security: 21st Century Challenges

    $3897

    William Nolte

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/11 - 12/18

    Counterintelligence information regarding and operations against foreign intelligence services has always been central to the intelligence process. In many places and at various times, it has been clearly the most significant part of that process. For reasons that will be discussed during the semester, this has not been true in American intelligence for the last half century or so. This class will examine the doctrine and processes of counterintelligence through the 20th century, with the second half of the class pivoting to address the challenges posed by a volatile information and communications environment, a geopolitical environment in which non-states operate as both potential threats and potential partners, and in which insider threats may be as great as those emanating from foreign actors. Finally, the course will address the challenges of operating effective counterintelligence operations in a manner that respects democratic processes and values.

    470.608.51 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/11 - 12/18

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    This is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management

    470.630.51 - Congress and the Making of Foreign Policy

    $3897

    Lester Munson

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/6 - 12/13

    This class will examine the role of Congress in the making of American foreign policy. In particular, this class will discuss the role of Congress in war powers, economic sanctions, human rights advocacy, the approval of international agreements including treaties, international affairs budgets and spending, investigations and oversight of the conduct of foreign policy by the executive branch as well as the impact of Congress on the general direction of American foreign policies and priorities. Special attention will be given to the role of Congress in U.S. policy toward Iran over the past few decades, the use of military force in Iraq and Syria, the role of the legislative branch in U.S policy toward China and Taiwan and the promotion of human rights as a component of American foreign policy. The class will seek to examine the specific actions of Congress on these matters, and their causes and consequences. The class will use books, articles and original source material from committee deliberations and floor action. As we examine these topics, we will come back to larger themes – the balance of power between the executive and legislative branches, the impact of partisan and bureaucratic politics, and the changing role of the United States on the world stage. All this will be discussed with a mind to the role of foreign policy practitioners.

    This course counts towards the Security Studies Concentration

    470.650.51 - Legal Issues in Intelligence and National Security

    $3897

    Mark Zaid

    Monday 7:30 - 10:00; 9/10 - 12/17

    This class will examine the interplay between the laws and the practices and policies of the United States’ Intelligence Community and national security system, both foreign and domestic. While discussion of the history of intelligence activities and laws dating from the origins of our colonial days will necessarily shape the framework of the class, the focus shall particularly be on current debates and challenges faced by the United States in the 21st Century.

    470.664.51 - Identity, Insurgency and Civil War in the World System

    $3897

    Michael Vlahos

    Tuesday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/11 - 12/18

    Societies in civil conflict are in crises of legitimacy and authority. Often we call these conflicts insurgency, revolution, or civil war. These terms can be seen as distinct. Insurgency represents an initial conflict phase, in which a competing movement threatens constitutional identity and its ruling order. Revolution establishes an alternative identity and political order. Civil war resolves the crisis of legitimacy and authority. Moreover, they often seamlessly flow together as one phase evolves into another. The course examines a number of past and present civil conflicts around the globe to illuminate larger patterns. It considers the relevance to America's situation today to the path of civil conflict in the Muslim world, post-Communist Europe, and Latin America.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3897

    Kevin Woods

    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.697.51 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    $3897

    John Sano

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/12

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    470.705.51 - The Midterm Elections and the Media in the Trump Era

    $3897

    Robert Guttman

    Monday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/10 - 12/17

    Historically, the party out of power gains seats in the House and Senate in midterm elections. Historically, when there is a president with low poll ratings like Trump has today, the opposition party wins seats in Congress. However, with the polarization of our politics and the constant tweets of our president the 2018 midterm elections for the House, Senate, Governor's races and state legislatures could be much different than analysts are predicting.

    The interactive class will follow the 2018 midterms in real time as the campaigns are taking place all the way through to election day in November. Social media will play a prominent role in the midterms and we will discuss and analyze the social media and traditional media platforms of the candidates. Plus we will discuss how the so-called mainstream media and other media are covering the midterm elections. We will look at the key issues of the campaign: Is Trump the main issue for many voters? Will issues of impeachment and Special Counsel affect voters? Is immigration and health care the key domestic issues? What role will North Korea, Iran, Syria, Mideast peace, Russian meddling in our elections play in the midterms? We will discuss and analyze whether Democrats move too far to the left and Republicans move too far to the right to capture the votes of their base. And, we will look at the winning campaign strategies of the new members of Congress and how they ran victorious campaigns in the Trump era.

    470.724.51 - Managing Dangerous Futures: Global Political Risk Analysis

    $3897

    Seth Kaplan

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/6 - 12/13

    Political risk affects almost every major decision that governments, corporations, nonprofit organizations, and even individuals make, sometimes turning what appears to be a good decision into a bad one, with severe implications. However, few people really understand political risk or how it can be evaluated and mitigated. The goals of this course are to ensure that all students can assess the political risk of a particular country or situation; assess the political risk of a particular business investment; take a much broader perspective on the possible sources of political risk; understand how the way people think and groups function preclude effective decision making (thus making bad decisions more common); evaluate risks using a variety of different risk assessment tools; and leverage a variety of mechanisms to improve risk management.

    470.725.51 - China's Impact on Global Security

    $3897

    Jennifer Staats

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 9/6 - 12/13

    As China's role on the international stage continues to grow, how will its behavior affect the dynamics of global peace and security? Beijing has long espoused a principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of other states, but China is becoming a more central player in efforts to address global security challenges. China's diplomatic outreach in Afghanistan and the Middle East, economic investments in Pakistan and Burma, increased participation in peacekeeping operations, and more vocal presence in multilateral institutions all reflect the country’s expanding influence. Students will put themselves into the position of national security leaders in China, in the United States, and in third countries to explore a range of national interests, priorities, objectives, strategies, and policy tools.

    470.748.51 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3897

    Gary Keeley

    Tuesday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/11 - 12/18

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done particularly from an American-British perspective. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits.

    470.750.51 - Modern Conflict in the Middle East

    $3897


    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This course examines the evolution of armed conflict in the Middle East over the past twenty-five years and why the United States’ conventional military dominance has not guaranteed strategic victory. Attention will be paid to how both states and non-state actors in the region have adjusted to America (and Israel)’s overwhelming conventional military superiority through both asymmetric tactics – i.e. insurgency, terrorism, tunnel warfare – and by exploiting the diffusion of advanced commercial technologies – i.e. improvised explosive devices, UAVs, cyberwarfare, information operations – for lethal or strategic purposes. Students will utilize “rationalist” and cultural frameworks to critically analyze these innovations across multiple conflicts/operations from Operation Iraqi Freedom and various Israeli-Palestinian conflicts to the Syrian civil war and Operation Inherent Resolve against the Islamic State. The course’s objective is to provide a better understanding of why technological superiority does not guarantee strategic success in modern conflict, and of the challenges U.S. policymakers may face in future conflicts both in the Middle East and globally.

    470.752.51 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3897

    Sarah Beebe

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/5 - 12/12

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems. Prerequisite: One of the following: 470.620 “Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community,” 470.711.51 “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy,” AS.470.748.51 “The Art and Practice of Intelligence,” or permission of instructor.

    470.784.51 - Technology of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    $3897

    Charles Blair

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/11 - 12/18

    Students gain the foundational knowledge behind WMD (both weapons of mass destruction and weapons of mass disruption) and about how these weapons threaten U.S. homeland security. Weapons of mass destruction traditionally include nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, while weapons of mass disruption include radiological weapons, such as "dirty bombs." In addition, the course covers the technology behind three WMD delivery vehicles: ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. In assessing each WMD threat, the course first examines the science and technology for each type of weapon and then applies this theory to real world threats emanating from state and non-state actors. Students apply this knowledge by engaging in red team exercises to identify options for preventing and reducing vulnerabilities from WMD. Please note that students do not have to have prior technical knowledge about WMD issues to succeed in this course.

    470.800.51 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3897

    Benjamin Ginsberg

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:00; 9/11 - 12/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    This course will meet on Tuesdays at 6:00 (EST) in Washington, DC. For students who are not in the DC, you may enroll in the class and access the class via Adobe Connect on Tuesdays 6:00 (EST) pm.

    470.851.51 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3897


    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 9/6 - 12/13

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    470.855.51 - Research Study Seminar

    $3897

    Mark Stout

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 9/5 - 12/12

    (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies). This course is designed for students who have already passed 470.851 Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science and either 470.854 Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods or 470.853 Historical Methods (or 470.709 Quantitative Methods with permission from program director). In this class, students will begin and complete a substantial piece of original research explicitly drawing on research methods they learned in the previous two classes. The research study is expected to be methodologically sound and to make a useful contribution to the issue under study. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and writing. The class will also prepare students for final defense. Graduation is subject to approval of the research study by the committee. Students should come into the class prepared with a detailed research question. Students may enroll in this course only in their last semester of the MA program.

    470.860.51 - Capstone for Public Management

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Tuesday 8:15 - 10:45; 9/11 - 12/18

    This is the final required course in the MA in Public Management program, and students can only take the capstone course in their final semester and after having completed all the other core requirements (Students graduating in the summer semester must take the course in the preceding spring semester). In the semester prior to taking the capstone course and conducting the project, students identify a project topic. The adviser for the paper will be the faculty member teaching the course. To complete the course, students must write a 30- to 35-page capstone paper.

    This is the final core requirement for the MA in Public Management. This course is for both online and on-campus students. Only students intending to graduate in the Fall of 2018 should take this course unless they receive special permission from Professor Weinstein.

    470.861.51 - Capstone Continuation

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 9/5 - 12/18

    Required for those who have completed all of their coursework and have taken the capstone course for either Public Management or Government Analytics but have not yet completed their capstone paper.

    This is a non-credit course that is only for students completing either their MA in Public Management or MS in Government Analytics capstone project.

  • Online Courses

    470.600.81 - Introduction to Graduate Work

    $3897

    Blake Ethridge

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course is an introduction to graduate work and will not count toward your degree, but is designed to help students maximize their performance and excel in graduate studies. The course will combine class work with one-on-one advising and tutoring. The course will cover such topics as research, writing, citation, argument, using evidence, study habits, and managing a graduate-level workload. Teacher and student will meet at the beginning of the semester to assess areas of greatest need and tailor the course to meet them.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a course designed for our provisional students. It is a non credit course for provisional admits, but can be taken as an elective by other students who are not provisional admits.

    470.602.81 - Government & Politics

    $3897

    Dorothea Wolfson

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course offers an overview of power and politics through the study of the government of the United States. All governments combine coercion and legitimacy. In a stable and legitimate system of government, coercion is hardly noticed. Government comes to be seen as a source of benefits. The purpose of the course is to look behind institutions, practices, and benefits to appreciate how, for what, and for whom we are governed. We shall examine some of the major institutions of American government, some of America's political processes, and some of the key forces competing for power in the U.S. to see how decisions in the areas of economic, social and foreign policy are reached. This is a core course of the Government Program but is open to all students.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3897

    John Gans

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.608.81 - Public Policy Evaluation & the Policy Process

    $3897

    Paul Weinstein

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course is designed to introduce students to the public policymaking process, to the basics of policy analysis, and to the substance of some of today’s major policy debates. The first half of the course focuses on establishing a framework in which to analyze public policy formulation within the United States. The class also reviews the tools for developing and implementing policy. The second half of the course turns to policy analysis of some critical contemporary issues. Building on earlier readings, we will study current debates in economic/tax policy, education, health care, social security, and national security. (Core requirement for the MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government. Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course is a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.611.81 - Introduction to Terrorism Studies

    $3897

    Elena Mastors

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course provide an overview of the principal areas important to the study of terrorism. The course offers a variety of academic, policy, and operational models, theories, approaches, and concepts regarding the definitions of terrorism, the nature and functioning of various terrorist groups across the globe, and a variety of domestic and international governmental operational and policy responses. Through this exploration, students will be able to identify patterns of behavior of both terrorist groups and governmental responses, and will also be able to identify gaps, and principal areas of improvements in how we understand, and respond to this important security challenge.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.620.81 - Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community

    $3897

    David Murray

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course provides students with an overview of intelligence structures within the Five Eyes community (US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). It covers both foreign and domestic agencies, be they civilian, military or police; HUMINT or SIGINT- enabled; security-intelligence or foreign-intelligence oriented; and tactically or strategically-focused. The course will compare how the various Five Eyes security or intelligence services set priorities and objectives, define national interests (versus shared requirements), develop tactical intelligence, create actionable insights, and how they craft timely and relevant assessments for both domestic and foreign partners. Students are expected to be able to draw conclusions on the value of different types of intelligence, from tactical operations intended to mitigate threat to life cases, to strategic insights relating to proliferation or espionage cases. Upon completing the course, students will understand the dynamics that exist amongst operators and analysts, as well as partners within and outside of the alliance, between domestic intelligence clients and foreign agencies, in regards to sensitive national interests and those of the international partnership.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.623.81 - Nonprofit Program Development and Evaluation

    $3897

    Steven Mayer

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Formerly Program Development & Evaluation in Nonprofits.) A major goal of this course is to help students become more proficient in recognizing, evaluating, and encouraging the kinds of benefits or outcomes intended by our society’s variety of nonprofit and public programs. We will examine what needs and opportunities are addressed by four major types of programs: those serving individuals, those serving communities, those serving networks or systems, and those serving other organizations. Evaluating each requires different lenses and different tools; we will explore the role of culture and context in choosing particular approaches to evaluation. A view of programs as interconnected rather than isolated will be encouraged. A second goal is to help students become more proficient in managing an evaluation process: We will explore purposes and uses of evaluation, the essential elements of an evaluation inquiry, and ways to communicate and use evaluation results. We will explore the variety of quantitative and qualitative strategies useful for evaluating progress in an organization’s attainment of its intended outcomes or benefits. Students can expect to become more proficient in discussing issues of nonprofit and public “program effectiveness,” and strategies for improving nonprofit and public program designs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.627.81 - Financial Management & Analysis in the Public Sector

    $3897

    Than Nguyen

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    The primary emphasis of this class will be to teach students how to make more informed business decisions through the use of financial management accounting information. Management accounting is concerned with the information provided managers to plan, manage control, and assess an entity’s activities and performance. Managerial accounting concepts are universal and can be applied to service, government, and nonprofit organizations. This class assumes no formal exposure to management accounting (or financial accounting, for that matter) and as such will focus on how to organize and use information to run/measure/operate a public entity or program. (Core course for the MA in Public Management. This course counts toward the Economic Security concentration. Elective option for Government Analytics students)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management

    470.640.81 - Challenges of Transnational Security

    $3897

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course focuses on transnational security issues and considers how many of these myriad challenges constitute threats to global peace and security. The combined effects of issues such as drug, weapons, and human trafficking, piracy, terrorism, infectious diseases, and deliberate environmental destruction, along with such critical enablers as corruption, and money movements, are not strangers on the world stage. What is new is their global reach and destructive potential. As a result, these issues have made policy makers consider different conceptions of security and, at times, to move beyond sole considerations of state sovereignty into the realm of human security. Not only are transnational security issues varied in nature and scope, but their effects often are obscured by the fact that many are nascent with gradual and long-term consequences. Further, while some transnational issues may not constitute direct threats to global security, they may threaten the world economy, and quality of life of its citizens. Still others compound and reinforce each other, generating mutations of the original threats. This course will examine a small number of these transnational security issues and relevant policy-making efforts.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.643.81 - Text as Data

    $3897

    Kevin Munger

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Text is not straightforward. In this course, students will develop the tools necessary to collect, analyze, and visualize large amounts of text. The course begins with a hands-on introduction to the programming concepts necessary to collect and process textual data, then proceeds to the key statistical concepts in machine learning and statistics used to analyze text as data. Throughout the course, students develop a research project that culminates in the online display of results from a large-scale textual analysis. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.644.81 - Democracy and Its Modern Critics

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Much of international politics in the last century can be described as a conflict between liberal democracy and its modern critics. During this period the values and political structures of liberal democracy have been extended to more parts of the world than ever before. Yet the same era also saw the emergence of powerful challengers to liberal democracy from both the right and the left. The resulting clash of ideologies defined such conflicts as World War II and the Cold War. In this course we will survey the intellectual roots of Fascism, National Socialism, and Communism. We will also examine the question of Islam and democracy looking at both its proponents and its radical critics in the Islamic world. Among those whose writings we will examine are Karl Marx, V.I. Lenin, Benito Mussolini, Carl Schmitt, Charles Maurras, Syed Qutb, Ali Shariati, Muktedar Khan, and Ruhollah Khomeini. This course counts towards the Security Studies concentration.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.645.81 - The Budgetary Process

    $3897

    Joelle Cannon

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    The federal budget process is an enormously complex mixture of administrative routines and mechanisms designed to bias decisions, avoid blame, or reduce conflict. This course explores the structures of federal budgeting in terms of its varied goals and in the context of the wider governing process. The course will review the budgetary process in both the executive and congressional branching, as well as the interaction of those two systems. In order to gain understanding of the difficult policy choices and political pressures policymakers face, students will be asked to do a simulation of a budget process within the executive branch. The role of entitlements, scoring issues, and tax policy will be examined in the context of the debate over budget policy. The course will start with a short primer on finance theory. (Recommended elective for MA in Public Management. Elective option for Government Analytics students.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course is a recommended elective for MA in Public Management students.

    470.656.81 - Presidential Power and Politics

    $3897

    Michael Siegel

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course considers the evolution of the presidency from its creation by the founders who had “their fingers crossed” while contemplating an executive agent for the emerging government, to its contemporary massive presence in our political system. The class also examines the interactions of the president with the other branches of government—Congress and the Courts—as well as the dynamics and management challenges presented within the executive branch itself. The course focuses on the leadership attributes of effective presidents, as well as aspects of personality or “character” that influence presidential performance. Finally the class focuses on the power and influence exerted by the presidency in domestic public policy and in foreign affairs. Students will be encouraged to develop their own ideas of what makes a great president ion the 21st century.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course counts towards the Concentration in Political Communications.

    470.666.81 - Institutional Fundraising: Raising Maximum Dollars from Government Agencies, Corporations and Foundations

    $3897

    Karen Osborne

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    In this hands-on course, we’ll help you understand the fundamentals of securing funds from institutional donors. As a staff or board leader of a non-profit, understanding the ins and outs of raising funds for priority projects and capacity building from government agencies, corporations and foundations will add to your toolkit for moving your organization forward. We’ll cover how this aspect of fundraising fits into your overall fundraising strategy and plan. We’ll help you identify the right potential funders for important projects, learn how to land capacity-building funds you can use to grow and sustain your organization, cover the basics of relationship-building with institutional decision-makers, help you use data to build credibility with funders, create pitch-perfect corporate presentations and dive into the process of writing winning proposals and applications. Finally, we’ll cover fulfillment and stewardship. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.667.81 - Machine Learning and Neural Networks

    $3897

    Mahmoud Lababidi

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Machine learning and, more broadly, artificial intelligence, has recently had a series of unprecedented successes in performing tasks such as image recognition and autonomously playing video games at a higher level of accuracy and performance than humans. These successes are driven by accelerated developments in machine learning, notably neural networks. This course covers a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis This course will cover a variety of machine learning algorithms from linear regression to nonlinear neural networks. Students will learn to implement these algorithms and understand how they work. Further, students will learn how to select and implement an appropriate algorithm depending on the type of dataset they have, and will be able to use the algorithm to generate predictions. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    470.673.81 - Data Visualization

    $3897

    Cathryn Rabinowitz

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course instructs students in various visualization techniques and software. Students will learn how to: (1) ask interesting questions about politics, (2) identify data that can be used to answer those questions, (3) collect, clean and document the data, (4) explore and analyze the data with statistical and graphical techniques, (5) create compelling, informative and accurate visualizations and (6) present these visualizations to educated audiences. Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Important Note: This course REQUIRES that you bring a laptop that supports Chrome to all class meetings.

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.681.81 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3897

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    470.681.82 - Statistics and Political Analysis

    $3897

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Introduces students to the concepts central to social science research design and methods used to summarize and present quantitative data. Applications using political and public policy data will be featured. Topics covered include research question formulation, cross tabulations, controlled comparisons, hypothesis testing and bivariate regression analysis. In addition, students will learn to use R, a powerful software program that is popular among political consulting firms, think tanks and government agencies. Government Analytics core course. The course is at the introductory level; there is no prerequisite.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.685.81 - The Challenge of Change: Innovation in Military Affairs

    $3897

    Jason Ridler

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Change is perennial in national security and military affairs, but knowing how, why, and when to embrace change is both difficult and vital. Strategies and tactics may be outdated, new ideas may be resisted, and science and technology continue to change our world faster than we can optimize. The paradox deepens with context: innovation in peacetime has one logic while innovation in war has another. This course unravels the nature of change in military affairs through four themes: ideas, materials, human capital and structure, and, appreciation of the enemy. The course explores these themes through a series of case studies from around the world. Topics include civilian development/military application of science and technology; learning from failure and success (including from other nations); institutional reactions to change; procurement and the role of industry; and, the impact and limitations of individual “champions” of change.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.688.81 - Political Institutions and the Policy Process

    $3897

    Douglas Harris

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Bridging the divide between political science theories of policymaking and the actual workings of the policy process in the institutions of national government, this course examines the individual contributions of each of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as well as the interactions and struggles between those branches. How do these various institutions set the policy agenda, develop and deliberate policy alternatives, make authoritative policy decisions, and implement those decisions? In what ways are the interactions between these institutions best considered conflict or cooperation? Also, how do outside actors and institutions -- the media, interest groups, public opinion, parties and campaigns -- affect policymaking in these various institutional settings? Drawing on the Constitutional design and historical development of these institutions as well as contemporary practice, this course examines the purposes, processes, and outcomes of policymaking from an institutional perspective.

    This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance Technology Fee: $200.00 Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.689.81 - NGOs in Development and Global Policy-Making

    $3897

    Laura Roper

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Formerly Overview of Global Public and Nonprofit Relationship). This course provides an overview of the role of both national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in processes of development, humanitarian response, and the promotion of human rights and active citizenship. The last decade has been one of rapid change in which NGO relationships with government, the private sector, and donors has been in a state of flux, with unprecedented challenges raised about the legitimacy and effectiveness of NGO actors. The course will look at how systemic changes the evolution of transnational advocacy, the aid effectiveness process, the emergence of new development actors from countries (such as India, China and Brazil) to the primacy of the private sector has influenced NGOs. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3897

    Jason Fritz

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.693.81 - Comparative Democracies

    $3897

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course uses the comparative method to look at the varieties of democracies that exist today. In the course, we will ask what is democracy, how do we measure it, and how does it vary across space and time? We will look at how democracy manifests in different constitutional forms e.g. parliamentary versus presidential. We will examine how different electoral and party systems influence variation in outcome within the set of democracies, and how social cleavages interact with, and are molded by, these systems. Further, we will use the answers to these questions to explore the issue of democratic consolidation and to ask why some countries become and stay democratic, while others do not. Case studies will be drawn from Europe, Latin America and Asia.

    This course counts towards the concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.699.81 - Applied Performance Analytics

    $3897

    Carter Hewgley

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Data are everywhere, and many elected officials and government managers understand they need it. But how can they use data to solve problems and shape policy? What is the best way to make decisions based on a data analysis? How do you communicate those decisions, and the rationale behind them, to employees, citizens and stakeholders? This course provides students with an experiential learning opportunity based on a real-world scenario. Students begin by studying foundational concepts and techniques of data collection, analytics, and decision support. They also learn how to navigate multiple interests, asymmetrical information, and competing political agendas as they make difficult decisions about resource allocation and public policy. Along the way, they learn how to turn insights into action by effectively communicating the results of analysis to busy executives and decision makers at all levels of the organization. Their work culminates in a showcase event where the class presents their recommended solutions to government practitioners, who review and critique their proposal.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Students will be required to use Microsoft Excel in the course; the instructor strongly recommends that students have a working knowledge of Excel. Students should be able to execute all of the following functions in Excel: sorting, filtering, pivoting, and making a chart. Recommended prerequisite: Statistics and Political Analysis.

    470.709.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis (or permission from the instructor).

    470.709.82 - Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Solutions to both political and policy problems increasingly require an understanding of how to understand and analyze data. Campaigns collect data to identify potential supporters and donors. Government agencies analyze data to evaluate programs. Research organizations use data to support their policy positions. This course will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to perform a cutting-edge statistical analysis. You will learn how to design and test regression models using Stata, an incredibly powerful and widely-used statistical software package. Other topics include interaction terms, measures of fit, internal and external validity, logistic and probit regression, and translating statistical findings for broad audiences. The focus of the course will be on using statistical methods in an applied manner. We will concentrate on using statistics to answer political and policy questions, not on the underlying mathematical theories. Recommended prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis

    Prerequisite: 470.681 Statistics and Political Analysis (or permission from the instructor). Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.710.81 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.710.82 - Advanced Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Jennifer Bachner

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Extends to the concepts taught in Quantitative Methods. Provides students with the tools needed to construct and evaluate advanced regression models. Topics include logs and polynomials, instrumental variables, fixed effects, time series and forecasting models, dynamic causal effect models and regression discontinuity models. Government Analytics core course. Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Prerequisite: 470.709 Quantitative Methods

    470.713.81 - Resisting Tyranny: Strategic Nonviolent Conflict

    $3897

    Maciej Bartkowski

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    War practitioners, policy makers, and security studies scholars study asymmetric warfare to understand why poorly armed insurgents effectively resist and even defeat technologically advanced and materially stronger armies. This course studies a perfect asymmetry in nonviolent warfare where unarmed ordinary people are able to effectively challenge and eventually defeat a fully armed, resource-rich regimes. In fact, historically, nonviolent movements have been twice as effective against violent regimes as armed insurgencies. This course will consider skills of organized populations in inter-state and intra-state conflicts, including anti-dictatorship, anti-occupation, anti-corruption, anti-violence struggles and analyze how disciplined civilians use nonviolent strategies and tactics to galvanize large and diverse participation, place their violent opponents in dilemma, make repression backfire and cause defections among adversaries' pillars of support.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3897

    Karin Orr

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course can serve as a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.728.82 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3897

    Karin Orr

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course can serve as a core requirement for the MA in Public Management.

    470.731.81 - Privacy in a Data-driven Society

    $3897

    Rhea Siers

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course will address the legal, policy and cultural issues that challenge the government and its citizens in the increasingly complex technical environment of privacy. We will examine the challenges in balancing the need for information and data against the evolving landscape of individual privacy rights. The course will examine privacy at all levels: by analyzing the shifting views of individual privacy by citizens as well as the technological challenges in both protecting and analyzing personal information for government use. Using case studies and hypotheticals, we will discuss the issue of transparency in the government use and retention of data. Our cases will range from healthcare.gov to “sunshine laws” to national security uses of information. We will trace the development of legal and policy measures relevant to privacy concerns and envision future solutions needed in an era of great technological innovation including the use of “big data”.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.746.81 - Iran: Security Policy of a Revolutionary State

    $3897

    Bryan Gibson

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course will provide the analytical and contextual skills required to understand the current political and security situation of Iran. After laying out the context of the Iranian Revolution through a brief examination of the Pahlavi years, the course then weaves together Iran’s political, military, diplomatic, social, economic development during the turbulent years between Iran’s 1978-1979 revolution and the 2015 nuclear agreement—covering a time period of roughly 1941 to the present day. This course covers three main inter-related topics: the history and development of the modern Iranian state; the interaction between state and society in modern Iran; and Iran’s diplomatic history in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course concludes with a discussion of Iran’s present-day foreign, security, and defense structures and processes.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3897

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done particularly from an American-British perspective. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.758.81 - Data-Driven Campaigns and Elections

    $3897

    Vanessa Perez

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course examines the ways in which campaigns increasingly rely on data and analytics to inform their voter mobilization and persuasion strategies. Campaigns are leveraging massive databases that contain information on voters’ spending, political engagement and media-consumption habits. Using this information, campaigns make decisions about which television/print ad slots to purchase and which voters to target in get-out-the-vote efforts.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.763.81 - Database Management Systems

    $3897

    Arman Kanooni

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course provides students with a strong foundation in database architecture and database management systems. The principles and methodologies of database design, and techniques for database application development are evaluated. The current trends in modern database technologies such as Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), NoSQL Databases Cloud Databases, and Graph Databases are examined.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.764.81 - Survey Methodology

    $3897

    Eric Lindgren

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course is a comprehensive examination of all aspects of designing questionnaires, conducting survey research, and analyzing survey data. The class will cover question construction, measurement, sampling, weighting, response quality, scale and index construction, IRB, ethics, integrity and quality control, modes of data collection (including telephone, mail, face to face and focus groups), post collection processing and quantitative analysis of data (including chi-square and ANOVA), as well as report writing basics.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.770.81 - Communicating Public Policy

    $3897


    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a new course offering which counts towards the Political Communications Concentration

    470.772.81 - Practical Applications of Artificial Intelligence

    $3897

    Melvin Greer

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Artificial Intelligence and Data Science are transformational technologies that hold the promise of improving the lives of society at large. While the hype around AI is growing, its adoption is anything but straight forward. The successful application of AI to lower risk, understand customers better and automate decision making requires a deep understanding of the right use cases where AI can lead to breakthrough innovations.

    This course will provide students an opportunity to investigate multiple AI use cases and evaluate their merit. Students will select a specific use case, develop reference architecture and determine an appropriate implementation strategy. The course will culminate in the development and delivery of a lab-to-market strategy for their selected use case.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.773.81 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3897

    Chad Briggs

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.776.81 - Nationalism in the Democratic Age

    $3897

    Alexander Rosenthal

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Nationalism and democracy have been two of the most significant forces shaping the contemporary world. The sense of nationality has provided peoples with a strong sense of shared belonging based around the ideas of a common language, land, and heritage. It has sometimes fuelled the demand for collective freedom and democratic self-determination. At the same time it has been a volatile force generating conflicts within and between nations across the globe. In Europe, the effort at forging a common European identity must confront the challenge of resurgent nationalism in traditional countries like Britain, France, and Austria. Meanwhile traditional states like Britain and Spain must themselves confront secessionist nationalism in Scotland, Catalonia, and elsewhere. The modern Middle East has been shaped in part by the conflicting goals of two major nationalist movements - Arab nationalism and Zionism. In Asia, nationalism is emerging as a dominant theme as countries like China and India rise to political and military power. In spite of economic globalization and the development of international laws and institutions, it is pivotal to understand nationalism if we are to understand world politics today.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 Webnote: This course counts towards the Concentration in Democracy Studies and Governance

    470.798.81 - Financial Management and Analysis in Nonprofits

    $3897

    Leana Bowman

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course surveys the basic tools for financial management and analysis through the lens of a nonprofit leader. Whether students are interested in a career in nonprofit organizations or in working with nonprofit organizations in other capacities, students will learn to be an informed consumer of financial information and an educated user of financial tools. Students will put themselves into the shoes of a nonprofit leader, understand how financial information and tools play an important role in evaluation and decision-making processes, and ask critical questions using the financial information and tools before making decisions and take actions. The course starts with an internal perspective before turning the focus externally. This course is not intended to make students financial experts. Rather, it will provide basic knowledge for students to ask the right questions, know where to get information and answers, and work effectively with financial experts in the field. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course can serve as a core course for the MA in Public Management.

    470.800.81 - Research & Thesis III: Government

    $3897

    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) Directed research in an appropriate subject determined in consultation with the student's adviser is the focus of this final course. Students are expected to propose research topics based on their classwork and/or on material derived from professional experience. Class meetings are designed to give guidance in the clarification of issues, collection of data, assembly of various parts, and the final writing of the thesis. Graduation is subject to approval of the thesis by the thesis committee. Students may enroll in this course and take their last elective with it. They must have completed 7 electives and all other core classes before registering for this course. Although for financial aid reason, they may take their last elective along with this course. Research and Thesis III is offered in all three terms—in the summer, fall, and spring—to provide as much scheduling flexibility as possible. Prerequisite: Students must have passed either Research and Thesis II or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies or have passed 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.850.81 - Research and Thesis I: MA in Government

    $3897

    Jacob Straus

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government) The purpose of this core course in the Government Program is for students to refine their thesis topic, develop their research design and complete a working outline for their thesis. Students will begin to research and write their thesis during this class in earnest. The course format is working sessions focused on specific research-oriented tasks. Emphasis will be placed on completing the literature review and methodology sections of the thesis. Students will also complete by semester end a preliminary chapter of their thesis papers and work with the professor to develop a plan for the other two papers that will comprise the portfolio thesis.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.852.81 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897

    Adam Wolfson

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.852.82 - Research and Thesis II: MA in Government

    $3897

    Ken Masugi

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    (Core course for the MA in Government. Please note that 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Methods may be substituted for this requirement with permission from the instructor) This directed research course is designed to help students complete the second paper of their thesis portfolio (and in some cases if a student has two papers ready for revision, both their second and third papers). Students will work closely with the instructor to revise a current paper, turning it into a research paper that 1) is tightly linked to the theme of the student's first paper and overall thesis portfolio; and 2) meets research and writing standards for being included in the thesis portfolio. Class meetings are designed to give guidance on the methods of research and on the clarity and focus of the research question the student is pursuing. Prerequisite: Students must have passed Research and Thesis I or Research and Thesis II: Global Security Studies.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.853.81 - Historical Methods

    $3897

    Jason Ridler

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Historians reclaim, recover, and revise what we know about the past. They enter a dialog with the dead to make sense of our world for the living, knowing full well that their hard-earned results may be overturned with new data, analysis, or insights. Yet questionable or flawed “history” is routinely to justify a range of experiences, policies, and events. In this course, we instill the key skills and analytical framework in which historians use to uncover and recreate the past, taking the journey from question, to research (onsite and online), to argument and revision (and revisionism). The importance of argument, objectivity, personal and temporal bias, evidence, narrative and cultural context are examined in detail, along with case studies of history being used, misused, and abused by historians and other actors.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.854.81 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management and fulfills a requirement for the MA in Global Security Studies.

    470.854.82 - Fundamentals of Quantitative Methods

    $3897

    Kelsey Larsen

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    The main purpose of this class is to train students to be informed consumers of quantitative studies, in addition to teaching the tools of basic statistical work. The emphasis in this class is on application and understanding of existing results, rather than on theory or derivations. The course material will cover basic descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and data collection. The key learning objective is for students to finish the class with a better understanding of the statistical and econometric results they may encounter, both in papers they read in other classes, as well as in the course of their work. The second key objective is for students to have the skills to employ basic quantitative tools in their own work in the fields of public policy and global security studies. As much as possible, assignments and readings used in class will be drawn from the public policy and security fields. There is no mathematical or statistical pre-requisite for the class. (Core course for the MA in Public Management and the MA in Global Security Studies.)

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This is a core course for the MA in Public Management and fulfills a requirement for the MA in Global Security Studies.

    470.862.81 - Capstone for Government Analytics

    $3897

    Holly Brasher

    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    This course is only for students in the MS in Government Analytics Program. The course guides students through the process of developing and executing an original data analysis project aimed at addressing a public policy, political or governance challenge. Prerequisites: Statistics and Political Analysis, Quantitative Methods, Advanced Quantitative Methods.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This course is only for students pursuing the MS in Government Analytics and should be taken in students' last or next-to-last term of that program.

    470.888.81 - Thesis Continuation

    $3897


    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    Required for those who have completed all of their course work, including the Research and Thesis class, but are still working on their thesis. Details of this offering will be posted soon.

    Technology Fee: 200.00

    470.902.81 - Sports Impact Leadership Certificate

    $3897


    Online 9/5 - 12/18

    The Sports Impact Leadership Certificate (SILC) program serves as a hub for sharing ideas and innovations to build a more sophisticated industry, with a greater community impact through sport. SILC, in partnership with Johns Hopkins University Advanced Academic Programs, offers you the opportunity to earn an innovative non-credit certificate with support from a world-class academic institution. SILC provides working professionals access to a network of top tier faculty, peers and organizations working with athletes, teams, leagues, nonprofit organizations, major consultancies, top firms and other sports industry stakeholders. SILC provides professional development including essential tools, perspectives and meaningful relationships that will help you and your organization adapt and capitalize on future trends and opportunities.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International (Cross-Listed)

    420.601.91 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    $3972

    Jerry Burgess

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/11 - 12/18

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    This course will meet on the DC campus, but there will be a weekend day time field trip to explore local geology and tectonic history. Field Trip Fee is $75.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.603.81 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    $3972

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/18

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Rhey Solomon
    Helen Serassio

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/18

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.671.81 - Global Land Use Change

    $3972

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/18

    This course provides a comprehensive examination of global land use change including the current spatial and historical extent of forests and grasslands, methods used to detect forest cover and its current and historical changes. Reviewing these patterns will lead to an understanding of the past and present drivers of land use change. In this course, we will consider the hydrological, and major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus) and the impacts that forests and grasslands (and the loss of these ecosystems) has had on these cycles. The impact of forest loss on biodiversity, long term functioning of ecosystems and climate will also be discussed. After reviewing the effects of a loss of these environmental processes, we will bridge the physical and biological sciences with the social sciences by examining economic impacts and socioeconomic drivers of deforestation. Lastly, current policies and the potential effect of policies that aim to reduce deforestation such as REDD will be discussed.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    475.605.81 - Program Development and Evaluation

    $3566

    Jeffrey Kantor

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/18

    From the perspective of funders, this course explores ways in which initiatives become sponsored programs, the role of strategic planning, how proposals are designed and disseminated, how responses are solicited and evaluated. The important role that communication plays is emphasized, and communication strategies and work products are examined. The course also allows students to become familiar with key roles and relationships, such as those played by the program officer, the proposal development specialist, and the principle investigator.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    420.679.51 - International Water: Issues and Policies

    $3972

    Winston Yu

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/12

    This course is a broad survey of the international water issues facing the 21st century. Topics to be covered include, water security, privatization of water service delivery, conflict and cooperation on trans-boundary rivers, the role of large multi-purpose reservoirs (for hydropower, water supply, irrigation), water as a human right, achieving the Sustainable Development Goals on water supply and sanitation, the role of water in food security, water institutions and policies, and climate change. Any discourse today on sustainable development is not complete without a discussion of the important role of water to society, economic growth, and poverty reduction. Our objective in this course is to gain a broad overview of these issues, primarily from the sustainable development lens, and to critically evaluate these challenges from a multi-disciplinary perspective (e.g. economics, environment, social, engineering, public health). This is important as solutions to water problems will require many different disciplines and expertise working together.

    420.687.51 - Science Communication and Policy Engagement

    $3972

    Rebecca Aicher

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/10 - 12/17

    This course provides students with an introduction to the theory and practice of communicating science and engaging with different types of audiences including policymakers, the public, and the media. Science is valued by many and sharing our understanding of science and technology is a crucial part of engaging beyond the scientific community. In this course, we will explore current research on the science of science communication, as well as how to create narratives for engagement based on the goals and audience. Students will have the opportunity to discuss engagement strategies and communication methods, design an engagement plan, and practice using their skills for engaging with policymakers, public audiences, the media, and more.

    425.605.51 - Introduction to Energy Law & Policy

    $3858


    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 9/5 - 12/12

    This course will provide an overview of the major laws and policies that shape and regulate the complex energy system the United States and, to a lesser degree, the world. The goal is to provide students with a framework for understanding the energy laws and policies of today and those likely to be important in coming years. The course will review laws and policies for all major types of energy, including fossil fuels, nuclear, and renewables, as well as issues related to extraction, conversion, distribution, use, and conservation. Laws and policies ranging from local level to state, federal, and international levels will be included. Laws and policies will be presented again in the context of profound and rate changes occurring in the energy system, climate change and other environmental issues, economics, national security, and population growth. The course will be largely empirical, but attention will be given to major theories. Most aspects of the course will be illustrated by reference to contemporary issues, such as the recently unveiled Clean Power Plan, court decisions, climate change negotiations, and changes in state policies and federal tax policies for renewables. Offered on-site at least once every two years.