Degree Requirements

Curriculum

The curriculum of the Environmental Science and Policy MS degree has been designed with a five-course core to provide the strong foundation of environmental science and policy required of all professionals in the field. These core courses provide rigorous study of the primary subjects affecting environmental issues.

Students focus their studies through elective of five elective courses chosen from a broad range of environmental disciplines including science, policy and regulatory based subjects. These electives provide rigorous, in-depth exploration of specific environmental topics.

Courses are active, intense, and current, involving a variety of learning methods and techniques. Course work prepares students for science, legislative, and management position.

Residency Requirement

The ESP program has a strong online presence and our degree can be completed from a distance. However we do require that at least one course must be taken onsite or via an in-person field study course to fulfill the residency requirement of the degree. Intensive courses are offered in compressed formats, often during the January and May intersessions, to help facilitate the residency requirement. However, it should be noted that there are additional course fees and travel expenses for most field courses.

Paul Kazyak discusses his approach to our intensive field course in Applied Sustainability
Bill Hilgartner highlights a few salient aspects of our field based Environmental Restoration course

Please see course pages (under The Experience) for more information on individual courses. It is best to work with your advisor to select the best residency course for your career goals. It is usually possible to cover these costs using Financial Aid; please consult with your Financial Aid Advisor.

Course Requirements

Provisional prerequisite courses
Provisional students who have not fulfilled one or more of the required courses for admission are required to complete one or more of the following prerequisites.

Provisional students may take appropriate undergraduate level courses (basic statistics and a basic calculus class) at an accredited university or college, or successfully pass the math assessment test to fulfill this Prerequisite. Provisional students should discuss these options with their advisor before taking any outside courses.

Provisional students may also fulfill this prerequisite by taking one semester of general chemistry at an accredited university or college. Provisional students should discuss this option with their advisor before taking any outside courses.

Note: Prerequisite courses do NOT count as courses toward the ESP degree.

MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy (no concentration)

The MS is ESP can be pursued with no concentration or by choosing one of the four concentrations listed below.

No Concentration

Choose Five of the Six possible core courses below:*

Five elective courses

For more information about core and elective courses, please see the Course Descriptions page. Note: All electives are not offered every semester. Also, the location (Washington DC, Baltimore) and mode of delivery (onsite or online) also varies. It is very important that students consult the Environmental Sciences and Policy Course Schedule for specific class offerings and times by semester.

Electives should be chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor and should accommodate individual career goals. When a student elects the MS degree without a concentration, electives may be chosen from any combination of the environmental sciences and policy offerings. Students may also consider related courses in the schools of Engineering, Public Health, SAIS, Business, or Education (see Registering for Courses in Other Divisions/Programs).

Please refer to the Advanced Academic Programs Course Schedule for exact dates, times, locations, fees and instructors. Courses are open only to students who meet enrollment requirements.

 

Capstone Project

The Capstone Project is optional for students pursuing the MS degree without a concentration. However, students in the MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy with particular academic or professional interests, including those who are considering a Ph.D. in the future, may wish to pursue independent research by completing the Capstone (only taught in the Fall and Spring).

The Capstone is required for the MS in ESP with a concentration. Research must be original and bring a new perspective to a field or topic; it may include analysis of previously obtained data, and overview and synthesis of published interpretations of such data, or original primary research in the field or lab. The general guidelines and timeline for the course can be found on the ESP website (Capstone Project). Note, if the project involves human subjects, clearance from the Johns Hopkins Institutional review Board (IRB) may be necessary and should be planned for as this process can take additional time.

Four Optional Concentrations

1. Environmental Monitoring and Analysis

This concentration focuses on identifying, assessing, monitoring, and quantifying environmental problems as well as progress towards the redress of these problems. The concentration enables students to work on various topics with a focus on measurement and analytical techniques.

Required Courses

Choose three of the following:

Electives
Choose five of the following:

Environmental Sciences and Policy Electives

Energy Policy and Climate Courses

  • 425.602 Science of Climate Change and its Impacts

Biotechnology Electives

  • 410.662 Epidemiology: Diseases in Populations

Geographic Information Systems Courses

  • 430.601 Geographic Information Systems
  • 430.602 Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications
  • 430.603 Geospatial Data Modeling

Public Health Electives

  • 187.610 Principles of Toxicology
  • 188.680 Fundamentals of Occupational Health
  • 340.601 Principles of Epidemiology

Engineering Electives

  • 575.727 Environmental Monitoring and Sampling

3. Environmental Management

This concentration focuses on finding balances among economic, environmental, and social interests. The field of study serves business leaders, who must consider environmental impacts of their decisions and develop competitive advantage within an ecologically constrained world. The concentration is also important to environmental leaders who need business skills to keep agencies and nonprofits afloat and who need to include economic issues in their proposed solutions to environmental problems.

Required Courses

Choose three of the following:

Electives
Choose five of the following:

Environmental Sciences and Policy Electives

Energy Policy and Climate Courses

  • 425.601 Principles and Applications of Energy Technology
  • 425.602 Science of Climate Change and its Impacts

Applied Economics Electives

  • 440.622 Cost-Benefit Analysis

Government Program Electives

  • 470.667 The Administrative State: How Washington Regulates

Carey Business School Electives

  • 786.701 The Nonprofit Sector: Scope, Structure, and Dynamics
  • 786.702 Managing the Nonprofit Organization: A Strategic Framework
  • 786.704 Financial Management for Nonprofits
  • 786.706 Resource Development (fund raising)
  • 761.724 Project and Team Management

Whiting School of Engineering

  • 575.407 Radioactive Waste Management
  • 575.423 Industrial Processes and Pollution Prevention
  • 575.707 Environmental Compliance Management
  • 575.747 Environmental Project Management

4. Environmental Planning

The focus of this concentration is to implement solutions to environmental problems in concrete situations. Environmental planning examines the interaction of the built environment and the natural environment in order to reduce impacts and restore the quality of both the natural environment and human settlements.

Required Courses

Choose three of the following:

Electives
Choose five of the following:

Environmental Sciences and Policy Electives

Energy Policy and Climate Courses

  • 425.601 Principles and Applications of Energy Technology
  • 425.602 Science of Climate Change and its Impacts

Geographic Information Systems Courses

  • 430.601 Geographic Information Systems
  • 430.602 Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications
  • 430.603 Geospatial Data Modeling

Whiting School of Engineering

  • 575.731 Water Resources Planning

Real Estate Division of the Carey Business School

  • 767.651 Environmental Issues in Real Estate
  • 767.695 Urban Redevelopment

Accelerated MS for JHU GECS students

Please see specific requirements for this degree.

*Note: Recent changes to the number of core courses required applies to students admitted for Summer 2017 and beyond. Students admitted prior to Summer 2017 will follow the degree requirements in previous year’s academic catalogue.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.