Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Homewood Campus

    420.614.01 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Jomar Maldonado Vazquez

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/29 - 5/7

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    420.637.01 - Conservation Biology and Wildlife Management

    $3972

    Jerry Burgess

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    In this course students examine the meaning and implications of biodiversity with a focus on disciplines associated with conservation biology, wildlife conservation and wildlife management, including taxonomy, genetics, small population biology, chemical and restoration ecology, and marine biology. This includes exploring how conservation biology differs from other natural sciences in theory and in application. Students learn the major threats to biodiversity and what natural and social science methods and alternatives are used to mitigate, stop, or reverse these threats. The course also includes the economic and cultural tradeoffs associated with each conservation measure at the global, national, regional, and local levels. The course is taught in the seminar-style with field trips. Offered in person in Baltimore, Washington DC or off-site annually. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.604.51 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3972

    Joel Carr

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/1

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    420.608.51 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    $3972

    Nathaniel Winstead

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/24 - 5/2

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    420.614.51 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Daniel Stone

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    420.654.51 - Environmental & Natural Resource Economics

    $3972

    Michael Shelby

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/2 - 1/22
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/2 - 1/22
    Saturday 10:00 - 4:00; 1/2 - 1/22

    This course presents the fundamental concepts and applications of economic theory related to renewable and nonrenewable resources, and environmental protection. Topics covered include the economics of resource use and depletion, the relationship between the environment and the economy as a whole, the role of government in addressing market failure, concepts and methods for valuing of environmental benefits, cost-benefit analysis of regulatory policies, and how economic incentives can be used to protect the environment. Offered onsite, annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis.

    Class meets on Tuesday and Thursday evenings and Saturdays during intersession.

    420.704.51 - Practical Engineering Approaches to Climate Adaptation

    $3972

    Eugene Stakhiv

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/24 - 5/2

    This course will briefly examine what risks recent POLICY actions pose to the environmental, economic and social infrastructure of the US and global community – especially the less developed nations – from the standpoint of climate-related natural disasters [floods, droughts, tsunamis, landslides, hurricanes, typhoons, monsoons, storm surges, forest fires, etc], and what technologies and technical options can be enlisted to mitigate the adverse [and some positive] effects associated with global warming.

    This course will focus on a few technical mitigation [e.g. geo-engineering] options, but will focus mainly on practical adaptation options and strategies related to contemporary [and future innovative] infrastructure solutions and existing ‘best management practices’ for coastal erosion, storm preparedness, flood/drought management and preservation of ecological systems. Real case studies, based on recent disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina [New Orleans] and Superstorm Sandy [New York metropolitan region], as well as international examples from the Great Lakes, Columbia R. basin, Rio Grande basin, Mekong River basin, small island states, and both European and African case studies will be used to highlight each of the major engineering-based adaptation strategies.

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3972

    James Taylor

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology Fee is $200.00

    420.302.81 - Chemistry of Natural Processes

    $3972

    Steven Bennett

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of chemistry, of Earth’s interrelated chemical systems, and of how to manipulate and interpret chemical data. Topics include molecules and chemical bonding, states of matter, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Through a series of exercises, students apply chemistry principles to solve real-world environmental problems. Prerequisite: Students are urged to take 420.301 Quantitative Methods for Environmental Sciences before enrolling in this course. Offered online only, one to two times annually.

    Technology Fee is $200.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    $3972

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee is $200.00

    420.603.81 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    $3972

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee is $200.00

    420.604.81 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3972

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.604.82 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3972

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    420.610.81 - Sustainable Business

    $3972

    Diana Watts

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an introduction to sustainable business strategies practiced by US companies. Students will examine the evolution of CSR and triple bottom line management in the context of competing stakeholder interests. Given that sustainability practices differ by sector, company and country, specific illustrations will be discussed in relation to deforestation, water and waste. Attention will be placed on evolving regulatory regimes including compliance mechanisms such as certification and auditing as well as voluntary partnering with NGO’s and government agencies. The discussion of sustainable business strategies will be approached as a policy debate that continues to be shaped at both the national and global levels.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    $3972

    Jorge Santiago-Blay

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.612.81 - Sustainability Science: Concepts and Challenges

    $3972

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Sustainability Science is an interdisciplinary field engaged with understanding the dynamics between natural and social systems and how those interactions challenge the notion of sustainability. This course will start by reviewing the history of the concept of sustainability and will then consider how it has been applied in the environmental sciences. Specifically the goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perspective on this emerging field, understanding its theory, research horizons, and practical applications. Concepts to be reviewed include socio-environmental systems, complex adaptive systems, cross-scalar impacts, tipping points and regime shifts, vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity, equity, sustainable development, political ecology, governance, capital assets and livelihoods. In a seminar context this course will consider these and other concepts from a theoretical perspective but will focus on their application in solving real-world problems.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.634.81 - Bioremediation & Emerging Environmental Technologies

    $3972

    John Cookson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course presents details of environmental technologies for assessment and remediation of contaminated sites. The course includes a brief review of environmental policy related to impacts of hazardous chemicals and endocrine blockers, but focuses on remediation technologies available for reclaiming contaminated resources and reducing health risks. It covers the application of multiple physical and chemical technologies, but emphasizes use of biological systems for the cleanup of hazardous chemicals. In the course, students are introduced to the nature of hazardous waste, behavior of chemicals in the subsurface, biochemistry of microbial degradation and technology applications. Bioremediation technologies covered include bioventing, air sparging, monitored natural attenuation or intrinsic remediation, and chemical oxidation. Students learn to select appropriate technologies, design a monitoring program for assessing the applicability of bioremediation techniques, develop biological conceptual models for natural attenuation, and understand the key principles for design. Case studies and problem sets acquaint students with field applications and introduce modeling techniques for predicting performance. Offered onsite, infrequently. Prerequisites: 420.601 Geological Foundations of Environmental Science and 420.604 Hydrology and Water Resources, equivalent courses, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.639.81 - Landscape Ecology

    $3972

    Kimberly Gardner

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Landscape ecology is a rapidly developing area of study that explicitly examines the effects of spatial pattern and scale on ecological processes that unfold over areas of several square kilometers or larger. Thus, landscape ecology provides many concepts, tools, and approaches that will enhance the effectiveness of endeavors such as watershed management, ecosystem management, design of conservation reserves and green infrastructure, and smart growth. The goal of this course is to give students a firm grasp of the concepts of landscape ecology and of how they can be applied to enhance the effectiveness of environmental policy, management, regulation, and assessment. Offered online at least every other year. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.644.81 - Sustainable Cities

    $3972

    Eileen McGurty

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines urbanization and its impacts on the environment. The goal of the course is to better understand how urbanization contributes to ecological damage as well as how cities can be constructed in ecologically healthy ways. Topics include land use planning transportation, waste, management, water quality, open space/greening, green building technology, urban design, and urban ecology. The course takes an international perspective by using case studies of cities in North America, Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. The case studies also include a wide range of cities with different populations, geographic scale, and growth rates. Final projects are an in-depth study of one particular city of the student's choice and its attempts to implement programs for sustainability. Offered online, annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.656.81 - Environmental Impact Assessment & Decision Methods

    $3972

    Helen Serassio
    Rhey Solomon

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces the process of environmental impact assessment and policy decision making as required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ). Topics include identification of purpose and need for any actions affecting the environment, development of objectives and decision criteria, and various techniques for assessing impact and comparing alternatives for a given environmental intervention. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches are evaluated with techniques that allow analysis of multiple objectives and conflicting uses of environmental resources. The importance of scientific credibility and public acceptance is demonstrated with actual cases. Offered onsite or online annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.666.81 - Community Development and Sustainability in developing countries

    $3972

    Amir Poudel

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces community development concepts via discussion of the environmental-social-economic nexus in developing countries. Students will seek answers to key questions such as: (a) How rural communities in developing countries interact with their natural environment (b) What are the drivers, tradeoffs, and feedback loops of such interactions and what lessons can be drawn to seek common ground for sustainability (c) how do interaction between social, environmental, and economic dimensions shape communities to adapt to changes in these dimensions (d) what are some of the successful models of sustainable community development and environmental management (e) what is the fundamental concept of sustainability and factors that influence sustainability and its pathways (f) what are some of the efforts in place through government, nonprofits, and the private sector to assist developing countries in attaining sustainability. Students will discuss topics ranging from energy saving stoves in the Himalayas; to indigenous practices in Africa for mitigating human-wildlife conflict within buffer zones; to community-driven approaches for water management and agriculture; to community forestry and leasehold forestry models. In addition to key problems and challenges, students will be introduced to important tools used to translate ideas into sustainable action, such as project logical frameworks. By the end of the course, students interested in international, community, and sustainable development would be able to engage in related debates and be familiar with approaches and techniques for designing sustainability solutions.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.672.81 - Environmental Ethics

    $3972

    Alexios Monopolis

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

    Technology Fee: $200

    420.676.81 - Global Scarcity in Freshwater Systems: Crisis and Solutions

    $3972

    Glenn Patterson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This graduate-level course explores the dual nature of water scarcity worldwide, including both natural and human causes, and what is being done to help people and ecosystems cope with scarcity. The course covers definitions of water scarcity, the geographic extent of the problem, and trends in factors that contribute to it. It also examines several types of actions that are being taken to deal constructively with water scarcity. These actions fall into the general categories of monitoring, supply enhancement, conservation, re-use, pollution control, lifestyle changes to lower our water footprint, and public policy changes. Many of these actions, especially those related to public policy, are incorporated into seven principles of sustainable water management detailed in the course textbook, “Chasing Water: A guide for moving from scarcity to sustainability”, by Brian Richter of the Nature Conservancy. Examination of the principles helps to end the course on a hopeful note by reminding us that humans collectively use only 5-10 percent of the water that falls as precipitation, and we have the capacity to greatly reduce the human suffering and environmental damage caused by poorly managed use of freshwater resources.

    Technology Fee: $200

  • Off-Site or International

    420.678.91 - Nature Conservation and Sustainability in Cuba

    $3972

    Jill Caporale
    Jerry Burgess
    Kathryn Wagner Hill

    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/7 - 1/22
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/8 - 1/22
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/2 - 1/22
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/3 - 1/22
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 1/4 - 1/22

    This cultural and scientific emersion program will investigate Cuba’s agroecology, tropical marine and terrestrial ecosystems as well as the countries unique geology. As wildlife and habitat have faded from the tropics, Cuba’s importance as an ecological bastion has risen. The island has the largest tracts of untouched rain forest, unspoiled reefs and intact wetlands in the Caribbean islands. Cuba also is home to many unique, or endemic, species, including the solenodon, and the bee hummingbird, the world’s smallest bird. In this course, students will have the opportunity to learn about the marine ecology through first-hand investigation of the reefs off the shores of Cuba, and learn about rainforest ecology through observations of Cuban forests. The course will also examine the interplay between geology, ecology, evolution and adaptation in areas such as coastal xeromorphic vegetation, swamp ecosystems, and Viñales National Park.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    425.646.81 - US Offshore Energy: Policy, Science and Technology

    $3858

    Amardeep Dhanju

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Offshore energy is progressively becoming a significant part of the U.S. energy mix. Oil from offshore platforms now accounts for roughly one-third of the U.S. domestic production, and significant interest has emerged for developing renewable energy resources in the ocean and the Great Lakes. Large-scale offshore wind projects have been proposed along the East Coast, and there is also interest in developing wave energy off the West Coast and the Pacific islands. Ocean current and tidal energy are the other emerging sources. This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to offshore energy analysis. We will discuss both renewable resources such as offshore wind, and conventional resources such as offshore oil and gas. Topics covered will include: resource assessment, state and federal regulations, economics of offshore energy, environmental impact and benefits, space-use conflicts, cultural/tribal issues, public perception, offshore energy technology, and energy infrastructure. We will also review case studies on the proposed Cape Wind project and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In addition, we will discuss the recently launched National Ocean Policy initiative and how it is influencing offshore energy regulation. Subject-matter experts from federal regulatory agencies will be invited as guest speakers. By the end of the course, students will understand policies and regulations governing offshore energy in the U.S. They will also be conversant with the economics of resource development, technological drivers for harnessing the resources, and the scientific advances in assessing and mitigating environmental impact from energy production in offshore areas. Offered onsite at least once every two years.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.800.81 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    $3858

    Daniel Zachary
    Michael Schwebel

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    465.707.81 - Reading the Landscape: Cultural Heritage at Scale

    $4167

    Brenda Barrett

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines the unique challenges faced by academics and practitioners in defining, preserving and managing rural, natural, and urban heritage at a landscape scale. The multiplicity of interests involved add to the complexity and require robust engagement strategies. Students will use a regional, national and international perspective to derive best practices for understanding the breadth of the cultural landscape concept and the opportunities for its sustainable development. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in the Two-Week Onsite Cultural Heritage Management Seminar (465.708).

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.728.81 - Fundamentals of Nonprofits and Nonprofit Management

    $3897

    Leana Bowman

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    (Formerly Influence and Impact of Nonprofits). The goal of this course is to convey the history, size and impact of the nonprofit and philanthropic sector while providing the fundamentals of nonprofit management and the founding of a nonprofit organization. Successful nonprofits today must have strong management systems in place in order to assure quality programs for service and impact. These systems include management of finances, strategic planning, human resources, information technology, marketing, performance measures and other aspects of operations. The course will help the student understand the current thinking regarding "best practices" in managing and improving nonprofit organizations and appreciate the interplay of environmental and organizational factors that influence managerial decision-making. Throughout the course, there will be a comparative perspective that looks at the scope and status of nongovernmental organizations in other countries and the influences on those organizations by their own governments, foreign aid and international philanthropy. Elective course for the Certificate in Nonprofit Management.

    Technology Fee: $200.00 This class can serve as a core requirement for Public Management students