Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.615.51 - Environmental Restoration

    $3819

    William Hilgartner

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/9
    Saturday 9:00 - 1:00; 7/1 - 8/12

    This is field-centered course focused on the prehistoric and land use histories of river, freshwater tidal wetland, serpentine and deforested environments that have been restored/designed in the Maryland and DC region. Knowledge of prehistoric ecological conditions and post-settlement impact along with modern ecological studies provide important long-term guidelines for restoration, mitigation and conservation measures. Saturday or Sunday field trips (6 sites) include identification of plant indicator species, bird identification, background on geology, paleoecology, historical impact, conservation and restoration approaches at the field sites. Site locations include Gettysburg Battlefield, Soldiers Delight Environmental Area, Big Spring Run Restoration (Lancaster), Severn River and Kenilworth Marsh, DC. Weeknight classroom sessions include plant identification of grasses, sedges and trees, birds as habitat indicators, and slide/lectures on vegetation, land use history and paleoecological data derived from pollen, macrofossil, geochemical and geomorphic analyses of the field sites. The pros and cons of different restoration and conservation approaches are reviewed. Offered every other year.

    Field Trip Fee: $100. This course corresponds to the Summer II schedule with evening classes on Wednesdays and six Saturdays for Fieldwork.

    420.626.51 - Field Methods in Ecology

    $3819

    David Curson

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 5/15 - 8/14

    This course centers on practical field exercises to develop both technical proficiency and broader understanding of varied ecological systems. Field methods include quadrate, transect, and SAV sampling as well as multiple techniques for surveying animal communities and monitoring water quality. While analyzing their own data, students develop deeper understanding of fundamental concepts such as species-area curves, importance values, species diversity, and community similarity indices. Students also are introduced to paleoecological tools such as sediment coring. Several ecological processes including succession and the effect of disturbances on community structure are demonstrated. The significance, advantages, and disadvantages of various surveying methods are explored in classroom meetings, but for much of the course students conduct their studies in the forests, fields, and wetlands of the area. This course is offered onsite only with fieldwork scheduled for a succession of Saturdays; some sections may conduct field trips on one or two Fridays and/or Sundays. Offered most summers. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience

    Field Trip Fee: $100.00. Field Trips - Saturday (9-5) field trips: July 1st, 8th, 22nd Sunday (9-5) trip: July 16th

    420.631.51 - Field Methods in Stream & Water Quality Assessment

    $3819

    Daniel Boward

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/1 - 7/13
    Saturday 8:30 - 5:00; 6/24 - 8/12
    Saturday 8:00 - 5:00; 7/7 - 7/9

    This course provides an overview of field methods used to sample and assess various biological, physical, and chemical components in streams, rivers, and lakes. It allows students to determine the impact human activity has on aquatic environments. Students gain hands-on experience with standard sampling techniques, and with the detection, identification, and quantification of biological specimens and chemical pollutants in the aquatic environment. Students discuss water quality standards and federal regulations such as the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act. Also included are study design, gear selection, sample preservation, and safety. Basic approaches to analyze and report findings are covered, with emphasis on methods currently practiced by government resource agencies. Offered onsite every two years. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    Field Trip Fee: $100. The Saturday June 24 meeting will be at the Homewood Campus in Baltimore, and there will be an overnight extended field trip to Camp Singewald from Friday July 7 to Sunday July 9. The following is the tentative course schedule Lecture - Thursday, June 1 - 6-9 PM Lecture - Thursday, June 8 - 6-9 PM Field Trip - Saturday, June 10 - 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (DCMD suburbs area) Lecture - Thursday, June 15 - 6-9 PM Lecture - Thursday, June 22 - 6-9 PM Lab - Saturday, June 24 - 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Homewood/Olin Hall rock lab) Lecture - Thursday, June 29 - 6 - 9 PM Extended Field Trip Camp Singewald - Friday, July 7 10:00 AM - Sunday, July 9 2:00 PM Final Exam - Thursday, July 13 - 6-9 PM

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3819

    James Taylor

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    $3819

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.604.81 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3819

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.608.81 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    $3819

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    $3819

    Jerry Burgess

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3819

    Helen Serassio
    Rhey Solomon

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.642.81 - Public Lands-Private Interests:The Struggle for Common Ground

    $3819

    Larry Silverman

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course prepares students to participate in the great debate over the use and protection of America 's federally owned forests, rangeland, parks, and sanctuaries. Students consider such questions as how much should be paid for grazing on federal lands; how to balance the demand for timber harvest with the need for watershed and wildlife management; who controls mineral and oil extraction on federal lands; and who has the rights to waters flowing through federal lands and stored behind federally funded dams. These and similar issues of today and tomorrow are studied in the context of history, statute and case law, and administrative regulations. Offered infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    420.660.81 - Strategies in Watershed Management

    $3819

    Glenn Patterson

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    Watersheds are often thought of as the basic organizing units for landscapes and the natural resources they support. As water is a fundamental resource that shapes landscapes, nourishes life, provides habitat and recreation, and transports sediments, nutrients, and wastes, prudent management of watersheds is critical for thriving ecosystems and human populations. The course comprises ten on-line modules students, each with topical content, web pages to visit, readings in the required text, and a quiz. Most modules also have discussions, and some have other assignments. The final discussion is a brief essay on a relevant topic of the student's choice. Students are introduced to definitions of ‘watershed’ and ‘watershed management’ in the context of natural resources science and policy. There is a brief review of basic hydrology, a look at the history of watershed management, and examination of the institutions and legislation that control activities affect watershed management. We discuss threats to watershed health, sources of information to guide watershed managers, and practices that can ameliorate the threats. Through case histories, the students are exposed to the collaborative process for assessing, protecting, and restoring watersheds. Offered online, annually.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    420.618.91 - Terrestrial and Marine Conservation Biology

    $3819

    Albert Manville
    Jerry Burgess

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/15
    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/15
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/15
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/15
    Friday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/15

    Both the Maine coast and mountainous, interior Maine provide a stunning and ideal venue for learning about the myriad conservation biology issues, challenges and solutions in dealing with both marine and terrestrial conservation. These habitats provide an ideal “living laboratory” for studying, understanding and implementing conservation biology. Acadia National Park, established in 1919, will provide us opportunities to investigate the only fjord in the Atlantic Northeast, Somes Sound; carefully assess the ocean-land interface, e.g., Otter Cliffs, Thunder Hole, Sand Beach, and the Ocean Path Trail; hike Cadillac Mountain — the first place to see the sunrise from October to early March in the continental U.S.; time permitting visit Long Pond and hike the Ship Harbor Nature Trail; and spend a day “at sea” investigating cutting edge marine conservation issues up close. Additionally, day trips will be scheduled for the Schoodic Peninsula (via ferry from COA’s dock to Winter Harbor) and to the new Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, just east of Mt. Katahdin, Maine’s highest mountain — designated by President Obama as our newest National Monument in August 2016. Since this is a brand new Monument, we’ll investigate how to help implement its mission including through a day hike assessing Katahdin Lake off the Loop Road. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience. Offerred every other year in the Summer.

    This course will be taught during the AAP Summer 2017 semester, Summer II June 28, 2017 to August 15, 2017. This course has a non-refundable $500 fee. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 11 students to run. Please be aware of all information on the course website: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-terrestrial-and-marine-conservation-biology-tmcb-in-maine/

    420.669.91 - Applied Sustainability

    $3819

    Paul Kazyak

    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/15 - 8/15
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/16 - 8/15
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/11 - 8/15
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/12 - 8/15

    This course examines the history and current trends in the expanding field of sustainability. Students will be exposed to a wide range of case studies, visit many field sites and have discussions with sustainability practitioners in Maryland to determine the current state of the science as well as impediments to progress. Additional work includes practical application through development and implementation of a sustainability-related vision project. Offered only as a compressed field course every other summer. Offered as intensive field course every other summer.

    Non-refundable course fee: $925 This is an intensive elective requiring an online portion beginning 10 May. Course fee includes transportation, site access, housing and group meals during the 6/2-11 field trip. The course ends on 11 June. More details are available on the course website, http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-applied-sustainability/

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    425.605.81 - Introduction to Energy Law & Policy

    $3782

    Peter Saundry

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    This course will provide an overview of the major laws and policies that shape and regulate the complex energy system the United States and, to a lesser degree, the world. The goal is to provide students with a framework for understanding the energy laws and policies of today and those likely to be important in coming years. The course will review laws and policies for all major types of energy, including fossil fuels, nuclear, and renewables, as well as issues related to extraction, conversion, distribution, use, and conservation. Laws and policies ranging from local level to state, federal, and international levels will be included. Laws and policies will be presented against in the context of profound and rap changes occurring in the energy system, climate change and other environmental issues, economics, national security, and population growth. The course will be largely empirical, but attention will be given to major theories. Most aspects of the course will be illustrated by reference to contemporary issues, such as the recently unveiled Clean Power Plan, court decisions, climate change negotiations, and changes in state policies and federal tax policies for renewables. Offered on-site at least once every two years.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    $3782

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fees: $175.00