Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.800.51 - Independent Research Project in Environmental Sciences and Policy

    $3972

    Jerry Burgess

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 6/3 - 8/19

    The independent research project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in their courses, develop expertise on a specific environmental topic, work closely with an expert in the field, and improve their professional writing skills. Students who take this elective must identify a project topic and a Mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The Mentor may be a faculty member teaching in the program or elsewhere at JHU, a qualified and appropriate person from the student's place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. A preliminary proposal must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor prior to enrollment in the course. In order to enroll in the class, permission of instructor is required. Final proposals for the IRP must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the IRP is to be completed. A Mentor Agreement form must be completed and returned at the beginning of the semester in which the student in take the I.R.P. course. This form is sent to the Mentor by the Course Instructor once the final proposal is approved. For more information please go to the ESP website => The Experience => IRP. Offered every term and scheduled as needed.

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3972

    James Taylor

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    $3972

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.603.81 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    $3972

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    $3972

    Jorge Santiago-Blay

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Rhey Solomon

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.614.82 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3972

    Christopher Van Wyk

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.629.81 - Drinking Water,Sanitation & Health

    $3972

    Glenn Patterson

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    In this course students examine scientific and public policy dilemmas related to the provision of safe drinking water and related protection of global human health. Course work emphasizes basic understanding of the fundamentals of water supply, treatment, regulation, and sanitation as well as providing a focus on unresolved issues confronting scientists, resource managers, and policymakers. Students work to develop recommendations for solutions to critical issues as controlling pathogens from urban and agricultural runoff, managing harmful by-products of the disinfection process, regulating arsenic in ground water, evaluating the risk posed by exposure to mixtures of contaminants, and confronting the threat of terrorist attacks on water supplies. Offered online, annually. Prerequisite: 420.604 Hydrology and Water Resources, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.632.81 - Air Quality Management and Policy

    $3972

    Christa Hasenkopf

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    Understanding and mitigating air pollution, both indoor and outdoor, is of extreme importance to global health. In fact, the World Health Organization released a statement in 2014 that in 2012, approximately 7 million people died - one in eight of total global deaths around the world - as a result of air pollution exposure. Air pollution also has an impact on climate change, in terms of its abilities to both exacerbate and reduce global warming. This course provides an overview of the principles, effects, and policies regarding outdoor air pollution with an emphasis on emerging international air pollution issues, public health and environmental impacts of outdoor air pollution, and evolving ways to monitor air pollution, from low-cost sensors to satellite techniques. Course topics include: history of air pollution events and management; major air pollutants and sources; atmospheric chemistry, transport and dispersion; measurement and monitoring; control technology; effects on human health and climate; and regulatory requirements. The effectiveness of the Clean Air Act, approaches toward air quality management in other countries, international treaties, future air quality projections, and regulatory case studies will also be discussed. Offered online, infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.608 Oceanic and Atmospheric Processes, an equivalent course or experience, or approval of the instructor.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.650.81 - International Environmental Policy

    $3972

    Kristen Hite

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course explores the methods and strategies for promoting solutions to global environmental problems. Through consideration of issues such as stratospheric ozone depletion, global climate change, tropical deforestation, loss of biodiversity, transnational pollution, and other threats to the international commons, students examine policymaking from the perspective of developed and developing countries, the United Nations system, international financial entities, and nongovernmental interest groups. By investigating important international agreements, students determine how far the international community has come in solving specific problems, what obstacles prevent effective international solutions, and what needs to be done to overcome barriers. Offered onsite or online, infrequently. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.668.81 - Sustainable Food Systems

    $3972

    Antoinette WinklerPrins

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course considers the environmental and social challenges of providing a sustainable global food system. We will investigate the geographic patterns of agricultural and food production systems, emphasizing contemporary patterns and how these came to be. Attention will be given to agricultural systems from the local to the global scale and we will consider the global distribution of production and consumption of agricultural products. The impacts of global change issues such as climate change, energy crops, population growth, and urbanization on food production will be also be part of the course. Offered online or onsite, annually.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    420.615.91 - Environmental Restoration

    $3972

    William Hilgartner

    This is field-centered course focused on the prehistoric and land use histories of river, freshwater tidal wetland, serpentine and deforested environments that have been restored/designed in the Maryland and DC region. Knowledge of prehistoric ecological conditions and post-settlement impact along with modern ecological studies provide important long-term guidelines for restoration, mitigation and conservation measures. Saturday or Sunday field trips (6 sites) include identification of plant indicator species, bird identification, background on geology, paleoecology, historical impact, conservation and restoration approaches at the field sites. Site locations include Gettysburg Battlefield, Soldiers Delight Environmental Area, Big Spring Run Restoration (Lancaster), Severn River and Kenilworth Marsh, DC. Weeknight classroom sessions include plant identification of grasses, sedges and trees, birds as habitat indicators, and slide/lectures on vegetation, land use history and paleoecological data derived from pollen, macrofossil, geochemical and geomorphic analyses of the field sites. The pros and cons of different restoration and conservation approaches are reviewed. Offered every other year.

    Class will meet Wednesdays from 6-8:45 at the DC campus and Saturdays from 9-12 at various field locations. Classes are tentatively scheduled for: Wednesdays May 30th, June 6,13,20,27 and July 11, and Saturdays June 2,9,16,23,30, July 7. There is a $100.00 field trip fee.

    420.631.91 - Field Methods in Stream & Water Quality Assessment

    Daniel Boward

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 5/30 - 7/11

    This course provides an overview of field methods used to sample and assess various biological, physical, and chemical components in streams, rivers, and lakes. It allows students to determine the impact human activity has on aquatic environments. Students gain hands-on experience with standard sampling techniques, and with the detection, identification, and quantification of biological specimens and chemical pollutants in the aquatic environment. Students discuss water quality standards and federal regulations such as the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act. Also included are study design, gear selection, sample preservation, and safety. Basic approaches to analyze and report findings are covered, with emphasis on methods currently practiced by government resource agencies. Offered onsite every two years. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    $75.00 Field Trip Fee. Class 1 (Tuesday, June 19; 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM) Class 2 (Thursday, June 21; 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM) Field Trip 1; DC/MD area (June 23; 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM) Class 3 (June 26; 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM) Class 4 (June 28; 6:00 – 9:00 PM) Lab 1; Homewood Campus (June 30; 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM) Lab 2; Homewood Campus (July 3; 6:00 – 9:00 PM) Lab 3; Homewood Campus (July 5; 6:00 – 9:00 PM) Field Trip 2; DC/MD area (July 7; 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM) Class 5 (July 10; 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM) Class 6 (July 12; 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM)

    420.675.91 - Geology and Tropical Ecology of Hawai’i

    $3972

    Jennifer da Rosa
    Kathryn Schubel

    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/30 - 8/22
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/31 - 8/22
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 6/1 - 8/22
    Sunday 9:00 - 4:00; 6/2 - 8/22
    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 6/3 - 8/22

    The breathtaking beauty and unfettered access to the soaring Mauna Kea, the highest mountain when measured from the ocean floor, and home to the Big Island's eight major climate zones, from desert to alpine, inspire countless superlatives. The volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawai’i are one of the premier examples of active hotspot volcanism in the world, and are by far the most accessible. This location offers an un-paralleled opportunity to observe the planetary processes of destruction and creation through Hawai’i's geology and tropical ecology. This field course explores the unique marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats of the island interconnections between the geology and the ecology and the integrated management of natural resources from volcanic mountain tops to the biodiversity of the coral reef. The primary goal of this interdisciplinary course will be to provide a solid foundation in field science for both geologic and ecologic methods. Specifically, we will examine the geological development of Hot Spot generated Hawaiian ocean islands we will describe the biological development of the ecosystems on the islands, and examine the interaction between humans (landscape use and introduction of exotic species) and the island environments (major biomes and anthropomorphic systems). As a field course natural communities will be a major emphasis. On land, focus will be placed on the tectonic development of the Islands and of the origin, evolution, and ecology of flora and fauna, and the reasons for the concentration of threatened and endangered species in Hawaii. In the marine environment, emphasis will be placed on the ecological processes that maintain biodiversity, community organization, and the impacts on coral reefs.

    Hawai’i: August 4 - August 11, 2018 Tuition: $3,819 (subject to change) Field Trip Fees: $2,100 This course has a non-refundable $500 fee. If you drop this course prior to February 28, 2018, you will be refunded the tuition only. If you drop this course after February 28, 2018, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 15 students to run. Website: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-geology-and-tropical-ecology-of-hawaii/

  • Off-Site or International (Cross-Listed)

    425.619.91 - Renewable Energy and Climate Change Projects in California

    Daniel Zachary
    Jennifer da Rosa

    Monday 9:00 - 5:00; 6/4 - 7/11
    Tuesday 9:00 - 5:00; 6/5 - 7/11
    Wednesday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/30 - 7/11
    Thursday 9:00 - 5:00; 5/31 - 7/11
    Friday 9:00 - 5:00; 6/1 - 7/11

    California has abundant natural resources and has long been the center of attention for renewable energy within the USA. The US Department of Energy indicates that California has just over 24% of its energy coming from renewable energy production, one of the highest for a large population state. Traditionally, California has also lead the nation in terms of proactive climate change and sustainability issues.

    This field trip will explore very innovative and leading sustainability projects in San Francisco. We will also visit the solar labs in nearby University of California, Berkeley, followed by a visit to nearby energy projects (e.g. Tesla, Google). Part of the trip will include discussing renewable energy projects with city and state officials.

    This course will be taught during the AAP Summer 2018 off-site, Summer I -- in California, June 17 – 22, 2018. Student fee is $1200 and will cover some group meals, some city transportation and all lodging. This field trip will explore very innovative and leading sustainability projects in San Francisco. We will also visit the solar labs in nearby University of California, Berkeley, followed by a visit to nearby energy projects (e.g. Tesla, Google). Part of the trip will include discussing renewable energy projects with city and state officials. After April 1, this course has a non-refundable $500 fee. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 15 students to run.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    450.644.81 - U.S. Environmental History

    $2638

    Eileen McGurty

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/30 - 8/22

    Environmentalism is a multifaceted phenomenon infused with many different schools of thought about the nature of environmental problems as well as the most appropriate solutions for those problems. This course will examine the major historical influences on the varied approaches to environmentalism and environmental practice. Students will explore the influence of environmental ideas and actions in the US from the 19th century to the present. The goal is to deepen our understanding of contemporary environmental practice – by others and ourselves – by tracing the influence of these historical trends in current debates and actions. Topics include conservationism, preservationism, transcendentalism and green romanticism, toxic construct, the wilderness construct, and sustainability.

    Technology Fee: $175.00