Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Homewood Campus

    420.614.01 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3819

    Jomar Maldonado Vazquez

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

  • Washington DC Center

    420.604.51 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3819

    Earl Greene

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/11 - 4/26

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    420.608.51 - Oceanic & Atmospheric Processes

    $3819

    Nathaniel Winstead

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/9 - 4/24

    In this course, students study the oceans and the atmosphere as interrelated systems. The basic concepts of air masses, water masses, winds, currents, fronts, eddies, and storms are linked to permit a fundamental understanding of the similar nature of oceanic and atmospheric processes. Among the course’s topics are weather forecasting, global climate change, marine pollution, and an introduction to applied oceanography. A field trip is included for in-person sections. Offered on-site or online two to three times each year.

    420.614.51 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3819

    Daniel Stone

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    420.634.51 - Bioremediation & Emerging Environmental Technologies

    $3819

    John Cookson

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course presents details of environmental technologies for assessment and remediation of contaminated sites. The course includes a brief review of environmental policy related to impacts of hazardous chemicals and endocrine blockers, but focuses on remediation technologies available for reclaiming contaminated resources and reducing health risks. It covers the application of multiple physical and chemical technologies, but emphasizes use of biological systems for the cleanup of hazardous chemicals. In the course, students are introduced to the nature of hazardous waste, behavior of chemicals in the subsurface, biochemistry of microbial degradation and technology applications. Bioremediation technologies covered include bioventing, air sparging, monitored natural attenuation or intrinsic remediation, and chemical oxidation. Students learn to select appropriate technologies, design a monitoring program for assessing the applicability of bioremediation techniques, develop biological conceptual models for natural attenuation, and understand the key principles for design. Case studies and problem sets acquaint students with field applications and introduce modeling techniques for predicting performance. Offered onsite, infrequently. Prerequisites: 420.601 Geological Foundations of Environmental Science and 420.604 Hydrology and Water Resources, equivalent courses, or experience.

  • Online Courses

    420.301.81 - Quantitative Methods

    $3819

    James Taylor

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This prerequisite course provides the necessary background in mathematics for students who do not have sufficient undergraduate course work in calculus and statistics. Students who receive a provisional admission because of math deficiency can opt to take the mathematics assessment test. If the student earns a score of 80% or better, then s/he is not required to take the course. In this course, students acquire quantitative skills and an understanding of mathematical principles fundamental to environmental sciences, and necessary for evaluating the implications of policy measures. Topics include probability and statistics, systems of equations, analytical geometry, and basic concepts of calculus. Problem sets, interpretation of data, and applications to everyday problems help students appreciate the usefulness of quantitative methods. Offered online twice a year.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.302.81 - Chemistry of Natural Processes

    $3819

    Steven Bennett

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the fundamentals of chemistry, of Earth’s interrelated chemical systems, and of how to manipulate and interpret chemical data. Topics include molecules and chemical bonding, states of matter, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Through a series of exercises, students apply chemistry principles to solve real-world environmental problems. Prerequisite: Students are urged to take 420.301 Quantitative Methods for Environmental Sciences before enrolling in this course. Offered online only, one to two times annually.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.601.81 - Geological Foundations of Environmental Science

    $3819

    Kathryn Schubel

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides an overview of Earth’s materials, processes, and resources for environmental scientists and policymakers. Topics include minerals, rocks, sediments, stratigraphy, structure, geomorphology, and geologic environments. Emphasis is placed on understanding geologic principles and methods as applied to environmental science, Earth resources, and public policy. Offered online or onsite, twice per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.603.81 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    $3819

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee:$175.00

    420.603.82 - Environmental Applications of GIS

    $3819

    Rachel Isaacs

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Geographic information systems technology (GIS) is a powerful data visualization and analysis tool.This course is designed to introduce students to advanced concepts of geographic information science related to the fields of reserve planning, environmental science, natural resources, and ecology for the purpose of spatial analysis and geo-visualization of environmental issues. Topics may include conservation needs using remote sensing, digital image processing, data structures, database design, landscape ecology and metrics, wildlife home range and habitat analysis, suitability modelling, terrain and watershed analysis, and spatial data analysis. This course will only be offered online yearly. ?

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.604.81 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3819

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee:$175.00

    420.604.82 - Hydrology & Water Resources

    $3819

    Christiane Runyan

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides an introduction to the hydrological cycle and examines the influence of climate, geology, and human activity on this cycle. The components comprising this cycle will be examined and include: precipitation; evapotranspiration; surface and groundwater flow; storage in natural reservoirs; water quality; and water resource management and regulation. Discussion of these topics in threaded discussions using the primary literature as well as problem sets will highlight applications and areas of current hydrological research. Offered online and onsite three times per year. Onsite version includes a required field trip.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.606.81 - Climate Justice

    $3819

    Eileen McGurty

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Climate change impacts and policies effect different groups of people in varying ways. More vulnerable populations will disproportionately experience impacts more severely (drought, flooding, food security, storms, heat islands, changes to resources and livelihoods). Also, policies to mitigate and adapt to climate change will have differential impacts. In this course, we will review both climate impacts and proposed policies through the lens of equity and justice. Topics to cover will include: analysis of differential impacts, equity critique of mitigation policies, and the impact of adaptation policies on the poor and people of color. The course will cover both the US and international topics.

    Technology Fee:$175.00

    420.610.81 - Sustainable Business

    $3819

    Diana Watts

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides an introduction to sustainable business strategies practiced by US companies. Students will examine the evolution of CSR and triple bottom line management in the context of competing stakeholder interests. Given that sustainability practices differ by sector, company and country, specific illustrations will be discussed in relation to deforestation, water and waste. Attention will be placed on evolving regulatory regimes including compliance mechanisms such as certification and auditing as well as voluntary partnering with NGO’s and government agencies. The discussion of sustainable business strategies will be approached as a policy debate that continues to be shaped at both the national and global levels.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.611.81 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    $3819

    Rae Wynn-Grant

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.611.82 - Principles & Methods of Ecology

    $3819

    Rae Wynn-Grant

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the relationship between organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment at three levels of biological hierarchy: individual organism, population, and community. Population characteristics, models of population dynamics, and the effect of ecological interactions on population regulation are discussed in detail. The structure and function of natural and man-made communities and the impact disturbances have on community structure are also examined. Students are led to appreciate the importance of ecology in solving environmental problems. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year. Onsite version includes required field trips.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.612.81 - Sustainability Science: Concepts and Challenges

    $3819

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Sustainability Science is an interdisciplinary field engaged with understanding the dynamics between natural and social systems and how those interactions challenge the notion of sustainability. This course will start by reviewing the history of the concept of sustainability and will then consider how it has been applied in the environmental sciences. Specifically the goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perspective on this emerging field, understanding its theory, research horizons, and practical applications. Concepts to be reviewed include socio-environmental systems, complex adaptive systems, cross-scalar impacts, tipping points and regime shifts, vulnerability, resilience and adaptive capacity, equity, sustainable development, political ecology, governance, capital assets and livelihoods. In a seminar context this course will consider these and other concepts from a theoretical perspective but will focus on their application in solving real-world problems. Offered on-site, infrequently.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.639.81 - Landscape Ecology

    $3819

    Kimberly Gardner

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Landscape ecology is a rapidly developing area of study that explicitly examines the effects of spatial pattern and scale on ecological processes that unfold over areas of several square kilometers or larger. Thus, landscape ecology provides many concepts, tools, and approaches that will enhance the effectiveness of endeavors such as watershed management, ecosystem management, design of conservation reserves and green infrastructure, and smart growth. The goal of this course is to give students a firm grasp of the concepts of landscape ecology and of how they can be applied to enhance the effectiveness of environmental policy, management, regulation, and assessment. Offered online at least every other year. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.651.81 - Risk Assessment and Risk Management

    $3819

    Arthur Koines

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    Analysis of risk is becoming an increasingly important component of regulatory decision making. Based on the premise that risk assessment has no “right" answers, this course explores what risk perception, risk management, and risk communication mean. Students are introduced to terminology and concepts necessary in risk communication. Case studies help to explain the complexities of risk assessment and management. Students learn how to balance the costs and benefits of risk reduction and how to account for the uncertainties in risk estimates. Offered online or onsite, annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.656.81 - Environmental Impact Assessment & Decision Methods

    $3819

    Rhey Solomon
    Helen Serassio

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces the process of environmental impact assessment and policy decision making as required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council of Environmental Quality (CEQ). Topics include identification of purpose and need for any actions affecting the environment, development of objectives and decision criteria, and various techniques for assessing impact and comparing alternatives for a given environmental intervention. The strengths and weaknesses of various approaches are evaluated with techniques that allow analysis of multiple objectives and conflicting uses of environmental resources. The importance of scientific credibility and public acceptance is demonstrated with actual cases. Offered onsite or online annually. Prerequisite: 420.614 Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis, equivalent course, or experience.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.667.81 - Analysis of Environmental & Ecological Data

    $3819

    Jerry Burgess

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will teach participants how to develop work flows going from raw data to graphics and statistical analysis, using the programming language and statistical environment R. Topics will focus exclusively on the biological sciences and will cover foundational concepts in statistical modeling (ANOVA, Regression, ANCOVA, PCR, etc); emphasis is on conceptual underpinnings of statistics not methodology, with a focus on defining statistical models and the major inference paradigms in use today.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    420.676.81 - Global Scarcity in Freshwater Systems: Crisis and Solutions

    $3819

    Glenn Patterson

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This graduate-level course explores the dual nature of water scarcity worldwide, including both natural and human causes, and what is being done to help people and ecosystems cope with scarcity. The course covers definitions of water scarcity, the geographic extent of the problem, and trends in factors that contribute to it. It also examines several types of actions that are being taken to deal constructively with water scarcity. These actions fall into the general categories of monitoring, supply enhancement, conservation, re-use, pollution control, lifestyle changes to lower our water footprint, and public policy changes. Many of these actions, especially those related to public policy, are incorporated into seven principles of sustainable water management detailed in the course textbook, “Chasing Water: A guide for moving from scarcity to sustainability”, by Brian Richter of the Nature Conservancy. Examination of the principles helps to end the course on a hopeful note by reminding us that humans collectively use only 5-10 percent of the water that falls as precipitation, and we have the capacity to greatly reduce the human suffering and environmental damage caused by poorly managed use of freshwater resources.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    420.625.91 - Ecology and Ecosystem Management in Coastal and Estuarine Systems

    $3819

    Paul Kazyak
    Kevin Brittingham

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting coastal and estuarine ecosystems with special emphasis on the Chesapeake Bay as a model system. Human influences on such large and critical ecosystems and the policy decisions made to manage and minimize human impact are explored in lecture and seminar formats. Topics include the hydrodynamics of shallow tidal waters; energy and material flows and transformations; diversity and adaptation of plant, animal, and microbial communities; population and pollution ecology; and ecosystem management. Case histories illustrate problems in fisheries management and the eutrophication of the coastal and estuarine systems. Offered annually, on-site. Required weekend field trips are included. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    This course has two anticipated field trips and will be co-taught by two of our faculty. One trip will be to the National Aquarium and the other a 3.5 day trip to the Chesapeake Bay Foundations facility on the Eastern Shore of MD. Accordingly, the meeting times are non-standard and follow the following schedule: 13 Jan (Saturday) 20 Jan (Saturday) 24 Jan (Wednesday) 31 Jan (Wednesday) 17 March (Saturday) 4 April (Wednesday) 25 April (Wednesday) Plus two field trips during the weekend, one in Feb (date TBD) and the other in April (19-22nd).

    420.670.91 - Sustainability Leadership

    $3819

    Paul Kazyak

    Using a highly interactive format, this course examines practical, state-of-the-art concepts in leadership, with a focus on the unique challenges of sustainability facing our world. Students will examine the essential components of leadership, including vision, communication, strategy, organization, synergy and strategy. Recognition of barriers and risks and how to work around them will be stressed, and the restricted conditions under which leadership is actually exercised will be revealed. Students will also practice self-reflection/assessment and become familiar with advanced tools to improve their leadership ability. Coursework will include frequent work in small groups, review of leadership case studies and a practical, ‘real-world’ vision development project. Offered only as a compressed field course every other January intersession.

    Website: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/sustainability-leadership-in-costa-rica/

    420.673.91 - Ecology and Evolution of the Galapagos

    $3819

    Jerry Burgess

    The Galapagos Islands have often been called the laboratory of evolution, where scientists have been able to study in detail many of the processes that have shaped the face of life on our planet. There are few places in the world, where it is possible to find such a variety of species, both animal and plant, which show so many degrees of evolutionary change, in such a restricted area. This course will have both a hands-on field experience and an in-class lecture component. As a field course, natural communities will be a major emphasis. On land (the Islands and the Amazon), focus will be placed on the tectonic development of the Islands and of the origin, evolution, and ecology of flora and fauna, and the reasons for the concentration of threatened and endangered species in the forests and on the Galapagos. In the marine environment, emphasis will be placed on the ecological processes that maintain biodiversity, community organization, and the impacts of climate change on coral reefs which are threatening their extinction.

    Please note: this course does not follow the regular tuition refund schedule and ALL tuition and fees for this course are NON-REFUNDABLE after the courses closes in September. The course needs 10 people to run. Refunds will be made if there are not enough people to run the course. The maximum number of people for the course is 18. Registration will be on a first come, first served basis with priority given to ESP degree candidates. Do not purchase travel or make other investments in your trip until you hear from the course Point of Contact that there are enough participants to run the trip. This will be determined by Thanksgiving, possibly earlier.

    420.800.91 - Independent Research Project in Environmental Sciences and Policy

    $3819

    Jerry Burgess

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:00; 1/8 - 4/30

    An Independent Research Project (IRP) is required for students electing the ESP MS degree with one of the concentrations. It is optional for students not electing a concentration. Students must have completed at least eight courses in the program before completing an IRP. The independent research project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in their courses, develop expertise on a specific environmental topic, work closely with an expert in the field, and improve their professional writing skills. Students who elect this option must identify a project topic and a Mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The Mentor may be a faculty member teaching in the program or elsewhere at JHU, a qualified and appropriate person from the student's place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. A preliminary proposal must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor prior to enrollment in the course. In order to enroll in the class, permission of instructor is required. Final proposals for the IRP must be approved by the Mentor and the Course Instructor at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the IRP is to be completed. A Mentor Agreement form must be completed and returned at the beginning of the semester in which the student in take the I.R.P. course. This form is sent to the Mentor by the Course Instructor once the final proposal is approved. For more information please go to the ESP website => The Experience => IRP. Offered every term and scheduled as needed.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    410.302.81 - Bio-Organic Chemistry

    $4196

    Kenneth Thompson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provides a foundation in structural organic chemistry, acid base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and reaction mechanisms. Subjects include Lewis structures, atomic and hybridized orbitals, stereochemistry, inter- and intramolecular forces of attraction, neucleophilic reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and the organic chemistry of biological molecules. Please note that this course does not count toward requirements for the master's degree in biotechnology. Prerequisite: Two semesters of college chemistry.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    $3782

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    430.602.81 - Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications

    $3782

    Kenneth (Jon) Ranson

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course introduces remote sensing as an important technology to further our understanding of Earth’s land, atmospheric, and oceanic processes. Students study remote sensing science, techniques, and satellite technologies to become familiar with the types of information that can be obtained and how this information can be applied in the natural and social sciences. Applications include assessment of land cover and land use, mapping and analysis of natural resources, weather and climate studies, pollution detection and monitoring, disaster monitoring, and identification of oceanographic features.Offered once a year in Spring.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    425.602.51 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3782

    Daniel Barrie

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice co and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online or on twice per year.

    425.800.55 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    $3782

    Daniel Zachary

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/11 - 4/26

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    470.657.51 - Energy, Security, and Defense

    $3783

    Oliver Fritz

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/11 - 4/26

    This course is a seminar-based overview of the role of energy in national security. Using a range of U.S. and non-U.S. case studies, students will review the roles of energy in grand strategy, the role of energy in conflict, and, finally, as a logistical enabler of military operations.