Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: We currently are not accepting applications to the online Master of Science in Energy Policy and Climate from students who reside in Kansas. Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs.

  • Washington DC Center

    425.601.51 - Principles and Applications of Energy Technology

    $3858

    Thomas Jenkin

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/28 - 5/6

    The course examines energy supply and consumption, and how these activities impact the environment, with a focus on understanding the potential technology, market structure and policy implications for climate change. Students will gain a solid understanding of the science, economics, environmental impact associated with various electricity generation technologies, including renewable energy, conventional generation (existing and future), carbon storage and sequestration, and electricity storage. Transportation topics will address a variety of technologies, including hybrids and fuels cells, as well as the potential role for alternative fuels, including biofuels. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    425.603.51 - Climate Change Policy Analysis

    $3858

    Marcus Sarofim

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 5/7

    After a study of the historical development of climate change policy, this course analyzes current policy options for mitigating and adapting to long-term climate change. The course will examine various approaches available in the U.S. for national-level policy, including regulatory and market-based approaches, particularly cap and trade and carbon taxation. Various models for designing a cap and trade system will be studied, including the European experience and regional programs in the United States. Special attention will be paid to methods for setting initial prices and accounting for discounting of future benefits. The course will focus primarily on national-level carbon management policies, but international agreements will also be included, as well as equity considerations on a global level.

    425.689.51 - Energy and Environmental Graduate Seminar

    $3858

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Thursday 5:00 - 7:45; 1/24 - 5/2

    This graduate seminar course provides exposure to leading topics and vanguard research in environmental science, conservation science, energy and environmental law, and climate change science and adaptation, and offers discussion on practical applications of energy technology and energy/environmental policy. Students will evaluate how each study contributes to the advancement of theory, builds on previous research, and poses questions for future research. Students will also critically analyze professional presentation styles and technical content throughout the semester and will then synthesize best practices for professional communication in their own practice. This course does not meet the Environmental Science and Policy residency requirement.

    425.800.51 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Daniel Zachary

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 1/24 - 5/2

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

  • Online Courses

    425.602.81 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3858

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.602.82 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The course begins examining the basic processes of the climate system. The course, then, moves to the study of the changing climate. While natural changes will be studied, the emphasis will be on anthropogenic climate change. Various models for predicting future climate change will be presented, including the assumptions and uncertainties embedded in each model. The regional climate impacts and impacts on subsystems will be examined, including changes in rainfall patterns, loss of ice and changes in sea level. The possible ecological effects of these predicted changes will also be examined. Offered online and on twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.604.81 - Energy & Climate Finance

    $3858

    Craig Hart

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces students to environmental markets and the policies that create them, focusing mainly on emissions trading systems to mitigate climate change. The course also provides an introduction to attributes of the financial sector through its analysis of markets for environmental commodities Students learn the economic theory behind market-based environmental policy instruments, such as tradable renewable energy credits, carbon offsets, and water rights in a semester of lectures featuring presentations from practitioners, including state and federal government, private companies subject to market-based emissions regulation, commodity brokers, and representatives from international institutions. Offered online on-site twice per year.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.625.81 - Solar Energy:Science, Technology & Policy

    $3858

    Jennifer da Rosa

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course focuses on the two primary solar technologies i the contemporary market: photovoltaic cells and concentrate solar power, with a focus on PV. The course will investigate techniques for increasing efficiency, expanding storage, and decreasing price. Solar energy for use as both distributed and grid-independent resources is considered. The course covers science and technologies, as well as the environmental impact on solar technologies. Additionally, the course examines the main structure considerations for solar technology development. Prerequisite: 425.601 Principles and Applications of Energy Technology.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.638.81 - Adaptation to Climate Change

    $3858

    Thomas Peterson

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Global climate change risks are increasingly complex and may ultimately affect virtually every facet of our economic, energy, community, and environmental systems. At the same time, policy and investment responses to climate resiliency needs are similarly complex, controversial, and high stakes. Perhaps no issue facing leaders of today and tomorrow is more cross- cutting in nature or in greater need of improved understanding and capability than climate change risk. This course will provide a comprehensive framework for understanding, assessing, and applying climate change risk, vulnerability, a hazard assessment for the development of risk reduction an adaptation response. In the process, it will examine the status, limitations, and strengths of current assessment and action planning approaches across varying sectors, scales, and impact areas. The course will also include a review of methods prioritizing actions and addressing feasibility, flexibility, and logistical needs as applied to specific facilities, such as military installations, as well broader communities and multistate regions. Individual and group learning exercises will be involved. Offered on-site at least once every two years.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.646.81 - US Offshore Energy: Policy, Science and Technology

    $3858

    Amardeep Dhanju

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Offshore energy is progressively becoming a significant part of the U.S. energy mix. Oil from offshore platforms now accounts for roughly one-third of the U.S. domestic production, and significant interest has emerged for developing renewable energy resources in the ocean and the Great Lakes. Large-scale offshore wind projects have been proposed along the East Coast, and there is also interest in developing wave energy off the West Coast and the Pacific islands. Ocean current and tidal energy are the other emerging sources. This course will take a multi-disciplinary approach to offshore energy analysis. We will discuss both renewable resources such as offshore wind, and conventional resources such as offshore oil and gas. Topics covered will include: resource assessment, state and federal regulations, economics of offshore energy, environmental impact and benefits, space-use conflicts, cultural/tribal issues, public perception, offshore energy technology, and energy infrastructure. We will also review case studies on the proposed Cape Wind project and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. In addition, we will discuss the recently launched National Ocean Policy initiative and how it is influencing offshore energy regulation. Subject-matter experts from federal regulatory agencies will be invited as guest speakers. By the end of the course, students will understand policies and regulations governing offshore energy in the U.S. They will also be conversant with the economics of resource development, technological drivers for harnessing the resources, and the scientific advances in assessing and mitigating environmental impact from energy production in offshore areas. Offered onsite at least once every two years.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    425.800.81 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    Thomas Jenkin
    Michael Schwebel

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    The Capstone Project enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study, and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a proper topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor must be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work, or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

    Technology Fee: $200.00