Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: We currently are not accepting applications to the online Master of Science in Energy Policy and Climate from students who reside in Kansas. Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs.

  • Washington DC Center

    425.800.55 - Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences

    $3782

    Daniel Zachary

    Thursday 5:30 - 8:30; 5/11 - 8/10

    Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences. Research Design for Capstone Projects in Energy and Environmental Sciences enables students to apply and synthesize the material learned in other courses, develop expertise on a specific topic related to climate change science or policy, work closely with experts in the field of study and improve professional writing and presentation skills. In the semester prior to conducting the project, students must identify a project topic and mentor who is both familiar with the chosen topic and willing to guide and oversee the project. The mentor may be a faculty member teaching in the program, a supervisor from the student’s place of work or any expert with appropriate credentials. Formal proposals must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the project is to be completed. Prior to the enrollment in the course, the proposal must be reviewed and accepted by the course instructor.

  • Online Courses

    425.602.81 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3782

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    The course will present the fundamental science of how the climate system works and describe both natural and human-forced variability in climate. Students will also learn about the observed and projected impacts of climate change through the examination of observational data and climate/Earth system model predictions and projections. Material in the course will be organized around three central themes: (1) physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, focused on the greenhouse effect; (2) the carbon cycle and its relation to the energy system; and (3) predictions and projections of climate change. Students will engage with the material through class discussions and a diverse set of assignments. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    425.602.82 - Science of Climate Change and its Impact

    $3782

    Daniel Barrie

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    The course will present the fundamental science of how the climate system works and describe both natural and human-forced variability in climate. Students will also learn about the observed and projected impacts of climate change through the examination of observational data and climate/Earth system model predictions and projections. Material in the course will be organized around three central themes: (1) physics and chemistry of the atmosphere, focused on the greenhouse effect; (2) the carbon cycle and its relation to the energy system; and (3) predictions and projections of climate change. Students will engage with the material through class discussions and a diverse set of assignments. Climate change and the potential impact and mitigation of carbon dioxide will be considered throughout the course. Offered online or onsite, twice per year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    425.605.81 - Introduction to Energy Law & Policy

    $3782

    Peter Saundry

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course will provide an overview of the major laws and policies that shape and regulate the complex energy system of the United States and, to a lesser degree, the world. The goal is to provide students with a framework for understanding the energy laws and policies of today and those likely to be important in coming years. The course will review laws and policies for all major types of energy including fossil fuels, nuclear, and renewables as well as issues related to extraction, conversion, distribution, use, and conservation. Laws and policies ranging from local-level to state, federal, and international levels will be included. Laws and policies will be presented against in the context of profound and rapid changes occurring in the energy system, climate change and other environmental issues, economics, national security, and population growth. The course will be largely empirical, but attention will be given to major theories. Most aspects of the course will be illustrated by reference to contemporary issues such as the recently unveiled Clean Power Plan; court decisions; climate change negotiations; and, changes in state policies and federal tax policies for renewables

    Technology Fees: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    425.621.91 - Renewable Energy and Climate change Projects in Australia

    $3782

    Daniel Zachary
    Ulrich Leopold

    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15

    This course will explore the technologies and the supporting policy and is planned for a period of 10 days. The trip will include travel to Sydney and to one other city amongst a list: Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney. The course will visit a number of renewable energy projects, including experimental and commercial sites. We will also visit the rich collection of projects in the Victoria and New South Wales area. We will also discuss with experts from some of the major climate labs including the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization and the Australian Bureau of Meteor.

    Special Notes: This course will be taught during the AAP Summer 2017 off-site, Summer I -- in Australia, June 18 – 28, 2017. Student fee is $1600 and will cover some group meals, some city transportation and all lodging. We will visit energy and climate change projects in Adelaide, Melbourne, and Sydney. After April 1, this course has a non-refundable $500 fee. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course needs 15 students to run. Please be aware of all information on the course website: http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/energy-policy-and-climate/the-experience/renewable-energy-and-climate-change-projects-in-australia/

  • Off-Site or International (Cross-Listed)

    420.669.91 - Applied Sustainability

    $3819

    Paul Kazyak

    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/15 - 8/15
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/16 - 8/15
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/10 - 8/15
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/11 - 8/15
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/12 - 8/15

    This course examines the history and current trends in the expanding field of sustainability. Students will be exposed to a wide range of case studies, local field visits and discussions with sustainability practitioners in Maryland to determine the current state of the science as well as impediments to progress. Additional work includes state-of-the-art sustainability leadership training, and practical application through development and implementation of a sustainability-related project. Offered only as a compressed field course every other summer.

    Non-refundable course fee: $925 This is an intensive elective requiring an online portion beginning 10 May. Course fee includes transportation, site access, housing and group meals during the 6/2-11 field trip. The course ends on 11 June. More details are available on the course website, http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/environmental-sciences-and-policy/the-experience/intensive-study-applied-sustainability/

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    420.614.81 - Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis

    $3819

    Helen Serassio
    Rhey Solomon

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    This course provides students with a broad introduction to U.S. environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA , RCRA , and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of the course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the global perspective on environmental policy. Offered online or onsite, at least twice per year.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    420.615.51 - Environmental Restoration

    $3819

    William Hilgartner

    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/9
    Saturday 9:00 - 1:00; 7/1 - 8/12

    This is field-centered course focused on the prehistoric and land use histories of river, freshwater tidal wetland and serpentine environments that have been recently restored or with the potential to be restored in the Maryland and DC region. Knowledge of prehistoric ecological conditions and post-settlement impact along with modern ecological studies provide important long-term guidelines for restoration, mitigation and conservation measures. Field trips include identification of plant indicator species, bird identification, background on geology, paleoecology, historical impact, conservation and restoration approaches at the field sites. Students work with plant identification, aerial photos, historic maps and documents, geologic maps, on-line sources, and paleo-ecological data derived from pollen, macrofossil, geochemical and geomorphic analyses in classroom sessions.

    Field Trip Fee: $100. This course corresponds to the Summer II schedule with evening classes on Wednesdays and six Saturdays for Fieldwork.

    420.626.51 - Field Methods in Ecology

    $3819

    David Curson

    Monday 6:00 - 8:45; 7/3 - 8/14
    Wednesday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/28 - 8/9

    This course centers on practical field exercises to develop both technical proficiency and broader understanding of varied ecological systems. Field methods include quadrate, transect, and SAV sampling as well as multiple techniques for surveying animal communities and monitoring water quality. While analyzing their own data, students develop deeper understanding of fundamental concepts such as species-area curves, importance values, species diversity, and community similarity indices. Students also are introduced to paleoecological tools such as sediment coring. Several ecological processes including succession and the effect of disturbances on community structure are demonstrated. The significance, advantages, and disadvantages of various surveying methods are explored in classroom meetings, but for much of the course students conduct their studies in the forests, fields, and wetlands of the area. This course is offered onsite only with fieldwork scheduled for a succession of Saturdays; some sections may conduct field trips on one or two Fridays and/or Sundays. Offered most summers. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience

    Field Trip Fee: $100.00. Saturday field trips: July 1st, 8th, 15th and 22nd.

    420.631.51 - Field Methods in Stream & Water Quality Assessment

    $3819

    Daniel Boward

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:45; 6/1 - 7/13
    Saturday 8:30 - 5:00; 6/24 - 8/12
    Saturday 8:00 - 5:00; 7/7 - 7/9

    This course provides an overview of field methods used to sample and assess various biological, physical, and chemical components in streams, rivers, and lakes. It allows students to determine the impact human activity has on aquatic environments. Students gain hands-on experience with standard sampling techniques, and with the detection, identification, and quantification of biological specimens and chemical pollutants in the aquatic environment. Students discuss water quality standards and federal regulations such as the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act. Also included are study design, gear selection, sample preservation, and safety. Basic approaches to analyze and report findings are covered, with emphasis on methods currently practiced by government resource agencies. Offered onsite every two years. Prerequisite: 420.611 Principles and Methods of Ecology, equivalent course, or experience.

    Field Trip Fee: $100. The Saturday June 24 meeting will be at the Homewood Campus in Baltimore, and there will be an overnight extended field trip to Camp Singewald from Friday July 7 to Sunday July 9. The following is the tentative course schedule Lecture - Thursday, June 1 - 6-9 PM Lecture - Thursday, June 8 - 6-9 PM Field Trip - Saturday, June 10 - 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (DCMD suburbs area) Lecture - Thursday, June 15 - 6-9 PM Lecture - Thursday, June 22 - 6-9 PM Lab - Saturday, June 24 - 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Homewood/Olin Hall rock lab) Lecture - Thursday, June 29 - 6 - 9 PM Extended Field Trip Camp Singewald - Friday, July 7 10:00 AM - Sunday, July 9 2:00 PM Final Exam - Thursday, July 13 - 6-9 PM

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3783

    Leila Austin

    Tuesday 6:00 - 8:30; 7/4 - 8/15
    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 6/29 - 8/10

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Michael Vlahos

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/10 - 6/28

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3783

    Christine Parthemore

    Monday 6:15 - 8:45; 5/15 - 7/3
    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 5/10 - 6/28

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.851.51 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 5/10 - 8/9

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as, measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Please make sure that new title shows in the system i.e. Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science