Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Online Courses

    465.704.81 - Cultural Heritage Management/Leadership

    $4167

    Donald Jones

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Cultural heritage management is a complex intersection of theory and practice. This course will explore issues related to cultural sector management and leadership. Through the lens of current practice, we will examine core theoretical concepts and tools, including traditional approaches as well as the incorporation of emergent technology. We will look closely at the roles of the cultural manager and the proficiencies and characteristics needed for effective management and leadership within the cultural sector. We will consider changing definitions of protection and stewardship as they relate to cultural heritage as well as a larger framing of public interest, what publics, which interests.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    465.707.81 - Reading the Landscape: Cultural Heritage at Scale

    $4167

    Brenda Barrett

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    This course examines the unique challenges faced by academics and practitioners in defining, preserving and managing rural, natural, and urban heritage at a landscape scale. The multiplicity of interests involved add to the complexity and require robust engagement strategies. Students will use a regional, national and international perspective to derive best practices for understanding the breadth of the cultural landscape concept and the opportunities for its sustainable development. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course before enrolling in the Two-Week Onsite Cultural Heritage Management Seminar (465.708).

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    465.732.81 - Engaging Communities in Heritage

    $4167

    Linda Norris

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    Museums and other heritage institutions are increasingly recognizing the value of "bottom-up" heritage programming. This class will explore issues related to community engagement in the heritage sector as well as strategize ways to engage various constituencies in the formulation, collection, and presentation of their heritage. We will use global case studies (as related to memory and memorial, sites of conscience, marginalized histories, indigenous heritage, and eco-museums) to explore the challenges faced by such projects. Examining both the failures and successes will result in a broader understanding of best practices in the field and help us formulate effective strategies for future engagement.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    465.740.81 - Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age

    $4167

    Douglas Pritchard

    Online 1/23 - 5/7

    A Neolithic settlement in Scotland, at risk due to coastal erosion, is digitally preserved through precise 3D laser scanning; the construction of the massive towers at Cologne Cathedral is brought to life with digital photogrammetry and augmented reality; multilayered cultural heritage information, images, and damage assessments are catalogued in open source databases. These are just a few examples of how a growing number of scholars, researchers, and practitioners are using the latest technology as a means to document, visualize, interpret, and preserve cultural heritage worldwide.

    This course will explore the ways in which cultural heritage professionals are implementing the latest digital technologies to enhance research, conservation, management and preservation of tangible and intangible heritage, as well as methods of education and engagement for visitors. Through lectures, readings, assignments, and social media, students will identify, analyze and debate the use of documentation, visualization and content creation technology currently being used in the cultural heritage engagement, studies and practice, as well as envision its use for the future.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

  • Off-Site or International

    465.708.91 - Two-Week Onsite Cultural Heritage Management Seminar

    $4167

    Charles Gentry

    MTWThF 9:00 - 5:00; 1/2 - 1/22

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground heritage management study in a location organized by the MA in Cultural Heritage Management program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities related to site management, heritage tourism, and conservation, alongside classroom sessions that integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of the designated location, the seminar provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and heritage experts, and explore the latest in cultural heritage practice. Students work on directed activities during the two-week period, coupled with multiple site visits focused on the academic work being accomplished. In order to register for this course, students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged. One of these courses must be 465.704, students are also strongly encouraged to take 465.707 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Individual course description will be posted for each location. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (465.780) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Field Trip/ Seminar Fees: $350 San Antonio, TX- Two-WEEK ONSITE SEMINAR- January 7-18, 2019. The cost of the onsite seminar course is the normal tuition rate for one class sin the Cultural Heritage Management Program which is $4167.00 a class. There is an additional $350 seminar field trip fee for the San Antonio seminar. The fee is not refundable after November 7, 2018. Registration: Students will register for this course (AS.465.708.91) in SIS (https://sis.jhu.edu). This course needs 8 students to run. The course roster will be combined with Musuem Studies Course AS.460.708.91 the maximum course enrollment with both course rosters is 20 students. (Registration: September 10- November 7, 2018).

    465.780.91 - Internship

    $4167

    Judith Landau

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 1/23 - 5/7

    An internship at a cultural heritage organization, approved by the internship coordinator, may be substituted for one elective course. To fulfill the internship requirement, a student must complete a minimum of 80 hours of work on-site and a project, (either a research paper or a practical product) on an approved topic related to his/her experience, due at the end of the semester. Students also participate in online discussion and course work during the semester. Before registering for the internship option, the student should contact the internship coordinator for approval. At least four to six weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place, the student must submit: 1) a description of the internship weekly duties including activities and/or responsibilities; 2) learning objectives and goals; 3) why this experience should be part of the Cultural Heritage Management degree; and 4) a signed letter of commitment from the internship supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

    Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    460.611.81 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    $4167

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.633.81 - Conservation-Restoration: A 21st Century Approach to Heritage

    $4167

    Rose Cull
    Daniel Cull

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Conservation-Restoration has existed for many hundreds of years, and conservators have been active in museums and the heritage industry since their inception. This course will explore the history of conservation-restoration, how it has changed over time, where it is today and where it might be going tomorrow. Conservation-restoration encompasses a variety of activities including: preventive/collections care, science, remedial treatment, and education and research. In this course students will be introduced to the activities of a conservator and how they add value to a collection. Students will become fluent in conservation-restoration research methods and publishing sources, able to identify good sources for information, and to understand the ethical issues in the field. Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666)

    Prerequisite: Collection Management (460.666) Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.639.81 - Material Culture and the Modern Museum

    $4167

    Colette Apelian

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    From the Mona Lisa to Archie Bunker’s easy chair, museums play a critical role in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of objects. This course looks closely at the development of material culture studies and its connection to museums in the 21st century. Students will explore collecting as meaningful action, the classification of objects (from academic categorizations to tags and folksonomies) and their access (from collections to archives, to physical and virtual display). Student-developed object biographies will be used throughout the semester to explore the life history of objects, their changing meanings, and their relationship to self, society, and the museum. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to have completed two courses in the program before registering for this course.

    Note: Students are strongly encouraged to have completed two courses in the program before registering for this course. Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.665.81 - Introduction to Archives

    $4167

    Daniel Linke

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of archives, including an overview relating to the elements of an archival program and the role and work of archivists. Special attention will be paid to the work of archivists in a museum context. The theoretical component of the course will be supplemented with a variety of hands-on exercises, case studies, and informed anecdotes designed to illustrate the relationship between theory and practice. Although American archival tradition will be the focus, international perspectives on archival theory and practice will play an important role in the course of study. Topics include: acquisition; appraisal; arrangement and description; preservation; reference; outreach; archival access systems; legal and ethical issues; and born-digital curation, including digital preservation.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.666.81 - Collection Management

    $4167

    Marla Misunas

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.670.81 - Digital Preservation

    $4167

    Riccardo Ferrante

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course introduces students to the current state of digital preservation, preservation challenges, and basic concepts for designing effective digital preservation plans and programs. Topics include the relevance of digital preservation for museums; archival principles that inform preservation practices; standards and policies; considerations in preservation strategies; issues relating to formats, repositories, and processes; and emerging preservation solutions and services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course. Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.671.81 - Foundations of Digital Curation

    $4167

    Joyce Ray

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    This course lays a foundation for managing digital information throughout its life cycle by introducing students to the emerging field of digital curation and by examining the practical issues and tools involved in managing digital collections and repositories over time. Topics include metadata schemas for describing digital assets in different disciplines; sharing digital content beyond the institution to reach wider audiences; requirements for trustworthy repository services; management of research data; policy issues; and user services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course. Technology Fee: $200.00

    460.686.81 - Culturally Specific Museums

    $4167

    Redell Hearn

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    Museums have the potential to provide safe spaces for comprehensive cultural inquiry. Culturally specific museums provide strategic platforms for showcasing diverse sets of art, history and culture with the intention of reaching a broad set of visitors. This course examines the significance of culturally specific museums, both individually and in relation to mainstream museums, to better understand how public culture engages issues of art, history, aesthetics, religion, ethnicity, and politics. Through the combination of contemporary reading material, survey of six national culturally specific museums, synchronous and a-synchronous discussion forums and guest speakers, students will discuss some of the ways in which culturally specific museums help make up the fabric of culture represented in museums in the United States of America.

    Technology Fee: $200.00

    470.766.81 - Economic Growth:The Politics of Development in Asia, Africa and Beyond

    $3897

    Sarah O'Byrne

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/23 - 5/7

    What makes some countries grow while others do not? What accounts for successful economic development versus stagnation?” As these questions become ever more relevant in an increasingly globalized world, this course offers an overview of this vast topic. This multi-disciplinary class begins with an exploration of the concept of development and how it has been viewed from both an economic and a political economy perspective. The second part of the course looks at factors (good governance, well-functioning markets, good health and education) that are necessary to achieve economic growth and development and then we move on to look at potential explanations for the absence of these factors (geography, conflict, culture). The concluding part of the course looks at potential solutions, both external and internal. Throughout the course, specific country examples are highlighted.

    Technology Fee: $200.00