Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Online Courses

    492.632.81 - Teaching Creative Writing

    $2918

    Mark Farrington
    Catherine Hailey

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course is designed for participants who wish to write and/or teach fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The course covers elements of writing in each genre, as well as the creative process and the similarities and differences between creative and other forms of writing. The course will also include readings in creative writing and lessons on how to use literature in a creative writing class. With the goal of integrating their writing and knowledge into their own classrooms, participants produce their own original creative writing and discuss it in a workshop environment. This course also may cover elements of playwriting and screenwriting.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    492.651.81 - Special Topics in Reading: Multicultural Texts

    $2918

    Susan Muaddi-darraj

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This reading course in the Teaching Writing Program covers fiction, nonfiction, and poetry written from a multicultural perspective. Texts are selected from a variety of genres aimed at various grade levels, and might include books such as Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-time Indian, James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, and Unsettling America: An Anthology of Contemporary Multicultural Poetry. Texts will be examined as models for writing and as works of current or classic literature. Course participants also present multicultural texts appropriate to the grade levels they teach.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    492.682.81 - Neuroscience, Creativity, and Writing

    $2918

    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    This course explores the latest research and practice in the effect of writing on the brain, and of the brain on writing. Students will read both theoretical texts and creative works that examine writing “under the influence” of various brain states, including typical variations throughout the writing life, as wells as variations correlated to physical and psychological brain changes. Virtual guest speakers, case studies, and multimedia experiences provide students access to cutting edge expertise in this fast-growing field. Students complete exercises and semester-long writing projects to develop methods to promote creativity and tap into deeper areas of the brain to aid their own writing and that of their students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    492.700.81 - Thesis in Teaching Writing

    $2918

    Mark Farrington

    Online 5/30 - 8/22

    In this final capstone course, students work on defining and expressing their own theories and best practices in teaching writing, while at the same time developing and refining their own writing. Students create and revise an individual portfolio that includes creative or personal writing along with writing about issues, theories and practices in the teaching of writing. Thesis students also create and research a statement of inquiry related to their specific teaching interests and situation. Students refine all these writings during this course, working with other students and independently with the instructor and/or individual project advisors. All eight prior courses must be completed before a student may enroll in Thesis.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Off-Site or International

    492.690.91 - Residency: Best Practices in the Teaching of Writing

    $2918

    Mark Farrington
    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 7/16 - 8/22
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 7/17 - 8/22
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 7/18 - 8/22
    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 7/12 - 8/22
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 7/13 - 8/22

    This 7-10-day residency, held each summer in Baltimore, MD, Washington, DC or other locations, will include readings, roundtables, field trips and other residency events. Teaching Writing students will meet for four to six hours each day in a face-to-face, classroom environment. Students will design and present a mini-lesson involving writing that they have used, or wish to use, in their own classrooms. Students will engage in discussions of theory and best practices in the teaching of writing, and will also participate in a writing workshop focusing on their own writing. One residency is required for M.A. candidates and is optional for those seeking the certificate.

    Johns Hopkins Homewood campus, Baltimore, Maryland. One-week onsite course July 22 – 29. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition ($2,918 + a possible increase for FY19) + a nonrefundable Fee ($750 includes housing, breakfasts, lunches and some dinners; $400 includes lunches and some dinners but not housing). Fees do not include transportation costs. If you drop this course prior to March 9, you will be refunded the tuition and your fees minus $300. If you drop this course after March 9, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course is open to any Masters or Certificate candidate in the Teaching Writing Program, or any other Johns Hopkins graduate student or alumnus who has completed the core Teaching Writing course. Although most of the coursework will take place during the residency week, some online work will be required prior to the start of the residency. If you elect to stay in the campus dorms, please notify Mark Farrington (mfarrin1@jhu.edu) so that we can monitor room availability. http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/teaching-writing/teaching-writing-residency/ (Registration runs: February 12 at 10am - March 2, 2018 at 11:59pm)

    492.690.92 - Residency: Best Practices in the Teaching of Writing

    $2918

    Mark Farrington
    Heidi Vornbrock Roosa

    Thursday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/17 - 8/22
    Friday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/18 - 8/22
    Monday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/21 - 8/22
    Tuesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/22 - 8/22
    Wednesday 9:00 - 4:00; 5/16 - 8/22

    This 7-10-day residency, held each summer in Baltimore, MD, Washington, DC or other locations, will include readings, roundtables, field trips and other residency events. Teaching Writing students will meet for four to six hours each day in a face-to-face, classroom environment. Students will design and present a mini-lesson involving writing that they have used, or wish to use, in their own classrooms. Students will engage in discussions of theory and best practices in the teaching of writing, and will also participate in a writing workshop focusing on their own writing. One residency is required for M.A. candidates and is optional for those seeking the certificate.

    Johns Hopkins Homewood campus, Baltimore, Maryland. One-week onsite course July 22 – 29. Costs = Graduate Credit Tuition ($2,918 + a possible increase for FY19) + a nonrefundable Fee ($400 includes lunches and some dinners but not housing). Fees do not include transportation costs. If you drop this course prior to March 9, you will be refunded the tuition and your fees minus $300. If you drop this course after March 9, there will be no refund. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. This course is open to any Masters or Certificate candidate in the Teaching Writing Program, or any other Johns Hopkins graduate student or alumnus who has completed the core Teaching Writing course. Although most of the coursework will take place during the residency week, some online work will be required prior to the start of the residency. If you elect to stay in the campus dorms, please notify Mark Farrington (mfarrin1@jhu.edu) so that we can monitor room availability. http://advanced.jhu.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs/teaching-writing/teaching-writing-residency/ (Registration runs: February 12 at 10am - March 2, 2018 at 11:59pm)