Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Global Security Studies courses also count toward the requirements for the Science, Technology, and International Security certificate. To view Global Security Studies courses offered for the Spring 2017 term, click here.
  • Science, Technology, and International Security students may also enroll in 430.601 – Geographic Information Systems and 430.602 – Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications for credit, with instructor permission. For more information, please visit the Geographic Information Systems Course Schedule page.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    406.682.51 - Nuclear Proliferation and Nonproliferation

    $3673

    Peter Almquist

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 1/10 - 5/2

    Since 1945, eight states have tested nuclear weapons, and perhaps two dozen others have started -- and stopped – nuclear weapons programs. This course considers why some countries pursue nuclear weapons and why others forgo them – an issue that bedevils both policymakers, concerned about the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and political scientists, attempting to explain and predict it. The class will delve into past and present examples, discussing and evaluating theories of why states pursue such weapons, the technologies that make it possible, and the policy tools available to prevent it. We will also draw on the parallel efforts to control chemical weapons, biological weapons, and ballistic missiles.

  • Online Courses

    406.661.81 - Technology and Terrorism

    $3673

    Charles Blair

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course explores the phenomenon of terrorism and its nexus with technology. Beginning with an emphasis on terrorist group factors most likely to influence terrorists’ perceptions and attitudes towards extant and emerging technologies, the course subsequently investigates cases of terrorist use, and noteworthy non-use, of various technologies. Students also receive a broad understanding of the evolution of technology with an emphasis on current and imminent technologies of acute security concern, including weapons of mass destruction, cyber, robotics, and nanotechnologies. The course then addresses counterterrorism technologies and potential terrorist response actions for overcoming such security efforts. Students operationalize all of these elements in the final phases of the course when engaging in Red Team exercises designed to demonstrate which types of terrorists are most likely to pursue certain types of technologies, the role of tacit versus explicit knowledge, likelihood of successful adoption, targeting options, and potential counterterrorism measures. Please note that students do not need to possess a technical background or prior knowledge of terrorism to succeed in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    406.663.81 - Defense Policy

    $3673

    Robert Haffa

    Online 1/8 - 4/30

    This course describes the principal challenges facing the making of American Defense Policy and explains previous and current policies declared and practiced to meet them. The course is designed to inform students on the most pressing defense issues confronting the United States, and to present them a framework for defense policy analysis. It emphasizes understanding those defense policies, analyzing them, and considering and weighing alternative approaches to achieving national objectives of deterrence and defense. The course fosters an understanding of the array of U.S. military capabilities providing plausible responses to the use of military power in support of U.S. foreign policy objectives. It examines those policies in the areas of nuclear, conventional, and irregular forces, and weighs alternatives in shaping the size and structure of those forces to meet national objectives.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    470.611.81 - Introduction to Terrorism Studies

    $3783

    Elena Mastors

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course provide an overview of the principal areas important to the study of terrorism. The course offers a variety of academic, policy, and operational models, theories, approaches, and concepts regarding the definitions of terrorism, the nature and functioning of various terrorist groups across the globe, and a variety of domestic and international governmental operational and policy responses. Through this exploration, students will be able to identify patterns of behavior of both terrorist groups and governmental responses, and will also be able to identify gaps, and principal areas of improvements in how we understand, and respond to this important security challenge.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.692.81 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Mark Stout

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.704.81 - Strategies in Insurgent and Asymmetric Warfare

    $3783

    Stephen Grenier

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This class examines the phenomenon of irregular warfare—of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies in particular—through a historical lens. The course will give you students insight into the origins, objectives, strategies, and tactics of irregular wars, as well as the principles of counterinsurgency theory and practice. Through the course, you will analyze current irregular wars, understand what caused them and whether they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful, and see how they can be combated.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.740.81 - Cyber Policy, Strategy, Conflict and Deterrence

    $3783

    Rhea Siers

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course will provide an overview of current issues in the cyber realm, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective. We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. We will analyze the roles of several different types of cyber actors including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector/business responses. This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. A technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 5/7

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.752.81 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems. Prerequisite: One of the following: 470.620 “Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community,” 470.711.51 “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy,” AS.470.748.51 “The Art and Practice of Intelligence,” or permission of instructor.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.773.81 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3783

    Chad Briggs

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    470.654.51 - Deterrence in the 21st Century

    $3783

    Donald Laird

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course will comprise a comprehensive examination of what deterrence is and what it will require in the 21st century. It will seek to grapple with and provide insights on a range of fundamental questions of theoretical and policy import including, What comprises deterrence in the years ahead?; How should decision makers understand the many new relevant domains and capabilities (not just nuclear, but space, cyber, missile defenses, advanced conventional) in which deterrence issues and concerns may well have to be paramount in their minds?; What are the roles and requirements of extended deterrence in the emerging geopolitical environment?; How might deterrence come to play in emerging areas such as hybrid warfare?; How might deterrence fail?; and What are the intentional and unintentional escalation paths and dynamics, including cross-domain dynamics, likely to be at work in crises and conflicts ahead?

    470.657.51 - Energy, Security, and Defense

    $3783

    Oliver Fritz

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/11 - 4/26

    This course is a seminar-based overview of the role of energy in national security. Using a range of U.S. and non-U.S. case studies, students will review the roles of energy in grand strategy, the role of energy in conflict, and, finally, as a logistical enabler of military operations.

    470.696.51 - Ethics and Privacy in Intelligence Operations

    $3783

    Rhea Siers

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/9 - 4/24

    This course will address the ethical dilemmas and privacy issues that challenge intelligence and government decision makers in an increasingly complex operational and technological environment. We will examine basic moral, ethical and privacy considerations from all sides at several key points in intelligence operations from collection to covert action. The course will analyze the evolving nature of privacy concerns worldwide, with an emphasis on the balance between individual rights and national security needs as executed by intelligence agencies. Students will examine the policy implications inherent in seeking to address these issues. The readings will include diverse and opposing viewpoints as well as practicums and simulations to allow debate of the key positions in "real world" situations. Prior enrollment in 406.665 "The Art and Practice of Intelligence" or 470.711 "Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy" is strongly encouraged.

    470.711.51 - Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy

    $3783

    Mark Lowenthal

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 1/8 - 4/30

    This course examines the role that intelligence plays in the formation of national security policy. The course explores the forces and events that have shaped U.S. intelligence. It examines the steps involved in producing intelligence from requirements through collection, analysis and the actual making of policy. The role of intelligence in the major intelligence issues facing the United States today will be discussed as well. The main text for the course will be Dr. Lowenthal’s book of the same title published by CQ Press which has been called the “best introduction to the role of the U.S. intelligence community in the national security policy-making process.”