Course Schedule

To view the Spring 2017 Class Schedule, click here.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Global Security Studies courses also count toward the requirements for the Science, Technology, and International Security certificate. To view Global Security Studies courses offered for the Spring 2017 term, click here.
  • Science, Technology, and International Security students may also enroll in 430.601 – Geographic Information Systems and 430.602 – Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications for credit, with instructor permission. For more information, please visit the Geographic Information Systems Course Schedule page.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    406.676.51 - The Politics of Cybersecurity

    $3673

    James Norton

    Thursday 6:00 - 8:30; 8/31 - 12/14

    In recent years, the United States has become dependent on cyber virtual networks as the engine for our society. However, this digital infrastructure remains extremely vulnerable to cyber attacks. Protecting the networks we rely on presents unique challenges, as networks are without borders and bear the stress of attack millions of times each day. This course will explore the challenges and political factors impacting the judicial, legislative, executive branch agencies of Department of Defense, Homeland Security, National Security Agency, and private industry as they all work to secure and create a national cyber security apparatus. The intelligence community is facing an enormous challenge in working to prevent the transfer of the United States’ intellectual property and identifying the cyber attackers. We will discuss the political implications of establishing laws addressing how information is to be shared between governments and industry and the authorities needed for the DoD and intelligence community to operate domestically. We will discuss the impact of the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and examine the evolving relationship of Congressional oversight and legislative mandates. Issues such as jurisdiction of congressional committees, the budget, and the authorization and appropriations processes will be covered. Major policy and counter-terrorism issues of special concern to Congress will also be addressed in this course. Guest speakers will be invited from DHS, Capitol Hill and the media, allowing us to examine the issues from a variety or perspectives.

    406.680.51 - The Impact of Science on National Security

    $3673

    Leonard Buckley

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    This survey course will explore the role of science and technology in the national security of our Nation. The focus will be on how science directly impacts nation security. The Federal role in funding science and technology along with a description of the Federal Laboratory system will be discussed. A high level view of the physics and chemistry behind various national security issues will be presented. These issues will include situations involving chemical, biological and explosive compounds and the science behind the tasks of sensing and protection involving these threats. The science and engineering behind the topics such as remote sensing, unmanned vehicles, autonomy, energy, climate change, and genome engineering will also be addressed. The course will be conducted in a part lecture/part discussion format.

  • Online Courses

    406.681.81 - Technology of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    $3673

    Charles Blair

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Students gain the foundational knowledge behind WMD (both weapons of mass destruction and weapons of mass disruption) and about how these weapons threaten U.S. homeland security. Weapons of mass destruction traditionally include nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, while weapons of mass disruption include radiological weapons, such as "dirty bombs." In addition, the course covers the technology behind three WMD delivery vehicles: ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. In assessing each WMD threat, the course first examines the science and technology for each type of weapon and then applies this theory to real world threats emanating from state and non-state actors. Students apply this knowledge by engaging in red team exercises to identify options for preventing and reducing vulnerabilities from WMD. Please note that students do not have to have prior technical knowledge about WMD issues to succeed in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    470.603.81 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.620.81 - Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community

    $3783

    David Murray

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course provides students with an overview of intelligence structures within the Five Eyes community (US, UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand). It covers both foreign and domestic agencies, be they civilian, military or police; HUMINT or SIGINT- enabled; security-intelligence or foreign-intelligence oriented; and tactically or strategically-focused. The course will compare how the various Five Eyes security or intelligence services set priorities and objectives, define national interests (versus shared requirements), develop tactical intelligence, create actionable insights, and how they craft timely and relevant assessments for both domestic and foreign partners. Students are expected to be able to draw conclusions on the value of different types of intelligence, from tactical operations intended to mitigate threat to life cases, to strategic insights relating to proliferation or espionage cases. Upon completing the course, students will understand the dynamics that exist amongst operators and analysts, as well as partners within and outside of the alliance, between domestic intelligence clients and foreign agencies, in regards to sensitive national interests and those of the international partnership.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.719.81 - Technical Collection of Intelligence

    $3783

    Robert Clark

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course covers the application of remote sensing technology to intelligence issues to include geospatial intelligence (GEOINT), measurements and signatures intelligence (MASINT) and signals intelligence (SIGINT). It examines the tradeoffs associated with the use of different imaging, radar, and passive radiofrequency sensors and collection platforms. The methods for processing, exploiting and analyzing raw intelligence data collected by different types of sensors are discussed. The final segment of the course investigates the management issues associated with remote sensing in intelligence.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will examine what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.851.81 - Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Social Science

    $3783

    Miriam Matthews

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 8/28 - 12/16

    This course is the first in the Research Study sequence for the Global Security Studies program. The goals of this course are: 1) to help students be producers of scholarly knowledge, 2) to prepare students for later parts of the research study process, and 3) to prepare students to understand and critique others’ uses of various methods. The first part of the course will address fundamental issues, such as measurement, causation, and inference. The second part of the course will address research design, data collection, and analysis, focusing on specific methodological tools including case study analysis, interviews, content analysis, participant observation, survey research, etc.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    470.601.51 - Climate Change and National Security

    $3783

    Christine Parthemore
    William Rogers

    Thursday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/31 - 12/14

    This course provides an in-depth examination of how the effects of climate change could impact national security, international relations, and global stability. Students will begin by examining and discussing the current body of academic literature. As the semester progresses, students will learn and practice how to use cross-disciplinary resources and tools to envision potential relationships between climate change effects and security outcomes.

    470.603.51 - Introduction to Global Security Studies

    $3783

    John Gans

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/30 - 12/13

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of global security studies, including theories of international relations, perception and misperception, theories of foreign policy, the varying concepts of security, and the elements of national power. It also includes a brief introduction to social movement theory. It applies these conceptual tools to selected security issues such as terrorism, climate change, and the causes of war.

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3783

    Kevin Woods

    Monday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/28 - 12/11

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.745.51 - Terrorist Financing Analysis and Counterterrorist Finance Techniques

    $3783

    Jason Blazakis

    Wednesday 6:15 - 8:45; 8/30 - 12/13

    This course will provide an overview of current issues in the cyber realm, focusing on policy and conflict from a U.S. and international perspective. We will begin with an understanding of the power inherent in cyberspace and consider the policy issues facing the civilian, military, intelligence and private business sectors in dealing with offensive and defensive cyber activity. Through the use of case studies, we will examine previous and ongoing cyber conflicts to understand their impacts on international relations. We will analyze the roles of several different types of cyber actors including state actors, non-state actors such as criminal and terror groups and private sector/business responses. This course will also examine the issue of cyber deterrence, and the unique aspects of offensive and defensive cyber activities by all cyber actors. A technical background is not required and basic aspects of cyber operations will be discussed and demonstrated as part of the introductory class sessions.

    470.752.51 - Intelligence Analysis

    $3783

    Sarah Beebe

    Wednesday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/30 - 12/13

    Intelligence analysis is fundamentally about understanding and communicating to decision makers what is known, not known, and surmised, as it can best be determined. Students will read seminal texts on intelligence analysis, discuss the complex cognitive, psychological, organizational, ethical, and legal issues surrounding intelligence analysis now and in the past, and apply analytic methodologies to real-world problems. Prerequisite: One of the following: 470.620 “Introduction to Intelligence in the Five Eyes Community,” 470.711.51 “Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy,” AS.470.748.51 “The Art and Practice of Intelligence,” or permission of instructor.

    470.797.51 - Introduction to Homeland Security Intelligence

    $3783

    Ronald Marks

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 8/31 - 12/14

    This course provides students with an intellectual foundation for understanding the concepts underpinning homeland security intelligence, as well as an overview of the US national homeland security framework including organization and policies. It examines the underlying intellectual constructs used to frame the comprehension of security issues, intelligence based on those issues and the development of policies and strategies that lead to implementing programs that protect the United States infrastructure and its people from attack. Over the term, students will be challenged to examine the various paradigms that shape homeland security intelligence and critically apply them to contemporary homeland security challenges and examine how well or poorly these paradigms are reflected in current responses, organizations and policies.