Course Schedule

To view the Spring 2017 Class Schedule, click here.

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

  • Global Security Studies courses also count toward the requirements for the Science, Technology, and International Security certificate. To view Global Security Studies courses offered for the Spring 2017 term, click here.
  • Science, Technology, and International Security students may also enroll in 430.601 – Geographic Information Systems and 430.602 – Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications for credit, with instructor permission. For more information, please visit the Geographic Information Systems Course Schedule page.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    406.683.51 - Weapons of War:The Technology and Uses of Weapons

    $3673

    Duncan Brown

    Tuesday 5:45 - 8:15; 7/4 - 8/15
    Thursday 5:45 - 8:15; 6/29 - 8/10

    Modern warfare utilizes advanced weapons systems. This course will examine various weapon systems ranging from artillery, cruise missiles, aircraft, aircraft launched weapons, ships, submarines and unmanned systems. We will also examine strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. In the examination we will look at capabilities, concepts of operation, and issues surrounding their procurement and use. The course will also involve students working through a crisis scenario utilizing various weapon systems. No pre-existing technical knowledge is assumed nor is any required.

  • Online Courses

    406.677.81 - Social Science in National Security and Intelligence

    $3673

    Todd Helmus

    Online 5/10 - 8/15

    This course examines the role of social science in national security decision making and intelligence. The course lectures, readings and classroom discussion are intended to help students understand the ambivalent relationship between social scientists on the one hand and intelligence personnel and national security policy makers on the other. It also considers the opportunities and limitations in the ways social science could contribute to policy making and how social science has contributed to key national issues. The course will help the student become a savvy consumer of social science. Counts toward Security Studies Concentration.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    470.676.81 - From al-Qaeda to Islamic State: Understanding the Roots of the Global Jihad Movement

    $3783

    Shiraz Maher

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    No topic has captured the public imagination of late quite so dramatically as the specter of global jihadism. While much has been said about the way jihadists behave, their ideology remains poorly understood. This course aims to help students explore the intellectual development of jihadist ideology, focusing on how conflict has shaped Islamic theology and law. We go from the movement’s origins in the mountains of the Hindu Kush to the jihadist insurgencies of the 1990s and the 9/11 wars. What emerges is the story of a pragmatic but resilient warrior doctrine that often struggles , as so many utopian ideologies do, to consolidate the idealism of theory with the reality of practice.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.685.81 - The Challenge of Change: Innovation in Military Affairs

    $3783

    -STAFF-

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    Change is perennial in national security and military affairs, but knowing how, why, and when to embrace change is both difficult and vital. Strategies and tactics may be outdated, new ideas may be resisted, and science and technology continue to change our world faster than we can optimize. The paradox deepens with context: innovation in peacetime has one logic while innovation in war has another. This course unravels the nature of change in military affairs through four themes: ideas, materials, human capital and structure, and, appreciation of the enemy. The course explores these themes through a series of case studies from around the world. Topics include civilian development/military application of science and technology; learning from failure and success (including from other nations); institutional reactions to change; procurement and the role of industry; and, the impact and limitations of individual “champions” of change.

    Technology Fees: $175.00

    470.697.81 - Intelligence and Counterterrorism

    $3783

    Cynthia Storer

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/10 - 8/15

    Counterterrorism is essentially an intelligence war. By definition, both sides use small forces and clandestine means, hiding their presence and activities not only from each other, but often from friends and allies as well. This course will explore the many roles of intelligence in every facet of counterterrorism, and ask students to evaluate their practical, legal, and moral effects and implications. It will also look at the terrorists’ own intelligence activities, and the “intelligence race” between terrorists and counterterrorists. There are no pre-requisites for this course. However, students would be well served to have a basic familiarity with intelligence and terrorism before the class starts.

    Technology Fees: $175.00