Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

Global Security Studies courses also count toward the requirements for the National Security Studies certificate. To view Global Security Studies courses offered for the Spring 2016 term, click here.

National Security Studies students may also enroll in 430.601 – Geographic Information Systems and 430.602 – Remote Sensing: Earth Observing Systems and Applications for credit, with instructor permission. For more information, please visit the Geographic Information Systems Course Schedule page.

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative.

  • Washington DC Center

    406.681.51 - Technology of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    $3566

    Charles Blair

    Monday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/16 - 6/27
    Wednesday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/11 - 6/22

    Students gain the foundational knowledge behind WMD (both weapons of mass destruction and weapons of mass disruption) and about how these weapons threaten U.S. homeland security. Weapons of mass destruction traditionally include nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons, while weapons of mass disruption include radiological weapons, such as "dirty bombs." In addition, the course covers the technology behind three WMD delivery vehicles: ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. In assessing each WMD threat, the course first examines the science and technology for each type of weapon and then applies this theory to real world threats emanating from state and non-state actors. Students apply this knowledge by engaging in red team exercises to identify options for preventing and reducing vulnerabilities from WMD. Please note that students do not have to have prior technical knowledge about WMD issues to succeed in this course.

    406.683.51 - Weapons of War:The Technology and Uses of Weapons

    $3566

    Duncan Brown

    Tuesday 5:40 - 8:00; 7/5 - 8/16
    Thursday 5:40 - 8:00; 6/30 - 8/11

    Modern warfare utilizes advanced weapons systems. This course will examine various weapon systems ranging from artillery, cruise missiles, aircraft, aircraft launched weapons, ships, submarines and unmanned systems. We will also examine strategic and tactical nuclear weapons. In the examination we will look at capabilities, concepts of operation, and issues surrounding their procurement and use. The course will also involve students working through a crisis scenario utilizing various weapon systems. No pre-existing technical knowledge is assumed nor is any required.

  • Online Courses

    406.677.81 - Social Science in National Security and Intelligence

    $3566

    Todd Helmus

    Online 5/11 - 8/16

    This course examines the role of social science in national security decision making and intelligence. The course lectures, readings and classroom discussion are intended to help students understand the ambivalent relationship between social scientists on the one hand and intelligence personnel and national security policy makers on the other. It also considers the opportunities and limitations in the ways social science could contribute to policy making and how social science has contributed to key national issues. The course will help the student become a savvy consumer of social science. Counts toward Security Studies Concentration.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Online Courses (Cross-Listed)

    430.601.81 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    $3708

    Heather Hicks

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/11 - 8/16

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the concepts and gain the experience necessary to appreciate the utility of Geographic Information Systems in decision-making. Topics covered include the fundamentals of data structures, georeferencing, data classification, querying, cartography, and basic spatial data analysis. The course provides an overview of the capabilities of GIS software and applications of GIS. Class time is divided between lectures and GIS exercises that reinforce critical concepts. Students must complete a term project as part of the course. Offered every semester. Elective option for Govt. Analytics students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.606.81 - American National Security

    $3673

    Kimberley Thachuk

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/11 - 8/16

    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the manifold challenges and opportunities that confront the United States in the area of national security. The course this class aims to help you assess why events occurred and policies developed, as it is with conveying the factual evolution of U.S. foreign relations. In that endeavor, the course has four objectives. First, the course will review the major perspectives on and debates about U.S. policy, and the institutions through which such policy is made and executed. Second, the course will review national security issues through scholarly, policy, political, and historical lenses. Third, the course aims to help students write for both policy and academic audiences. Fourth, students, especially security studies concentrators, can use the course to begin thinking about the direction they would like their studies at Johns Hopkins to take. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    470.748.81 - The Art & Practice of Intelligence

    $3673

    Mark Stout

    Online 6:00 - 8:45; 5/11 - 8/16

    This course will examine how what intelligence is and how it is done. It will place a strong emphasis on effort on the limits of the possible including limits on knowledge, ethical limits, and political limits. Drawing on historical examples, the course will look at the various types of intelligence collection and how they interact with each other. It will explore the analytic process and the interface between analysts and policymakers. I it will examine the connections between intelligence and policy formulation and execution in various aspects of the national security realm. The class will conclude with a brief exploration of differing concepts and practices in other countries.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

  • Washington DC Center (Cross-Listed)

    470.605.51 - Global Political Economy

    $3673

    Leila Austin

    Tuesday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/17 - 6/28
    Thursday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/12 - 6/23

    In the wake of the financial crisis, bank bailouts, and stimulus plans, the relationship between American economic power and national security is especially salient. In this course, students investigate core topics in international political economy, analyzing the security implications of each. Topics include trade relations, international finance, monetary relations, poverty and development. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.692.51 - Military Strategy & National Policy

    $3673

    Michael Vlahos

    Tuesday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/17 - 6/28
    Thursday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/12 - 6/23

    This course examines how states and other political entities use violence in pursuit of political objectives. It exposes students to the four levels of strategy—grand strategy, strategy, operations, and tactics—in a national security context. The course will then focus primarily on military strategy as such. Students will critically examine topics such as civil-military relations, land warfare, naval warfare, theories of airpower, insurgency and counterinsurgency, and nuclear strategy. The goal is to understand the embedded assumptions of these various strategic theories, and the circumstances under which they are likely to be successful or unsuccessful. Readings include primary texts that were important in the development of military theory as well as historical cases studies.

    470.751.51 - Politics and Security in the MIddle East

    $3673

    Bryan Gibson

    Monday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/16 - 6/27
    Wednesday 5:40 - 8:00; 5/11 - 6/22

    This course will cover key topics relating to Middle East politics and security, with a particular emphasis on emerging dynamics of the region in the wake of the Arab Uprisings. The course will explore several key themes such as the rise of sectarianism, evolving trends in Islamist militancy, and the status of social movements and identity politics in the Middle East. It will also address longstanding issues such as the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Iran's role in the region. Finally, the course will also examine U.S. policy responses to the changing political and security landscape of the Middle East. Classes will alternate between broader, theme-related sessions and country-specific cases.

    470.773.51 - Energy and Environmental Security

    $3673

    Christine Parthemore

    Tuesday 5:40 - 8:00; 7/5 - 8/9
    Thursday 5:40 - 8:00; 6/30 - 8/11

    This course surveys the multiple and overlapping aspects of energy and environmental security. Students analyze the contentious proposition that increased competition for environmental and energy resources threaten national security and may be the source of future wars across the globe. The course also examines how such threats may be mitigated. (Core course for the MA in Global Security Studies)

    470.853.51 - Research & Thesis II: Global Security Studies

    $3673

    Jacob Straus

    Thursday 5:45 - 8:30; 5/12 - 8/11

    In this course, students will work closely with the instructor to complete the second paper of the thesis portfolio and to make substantial headway on the third paper of the portfolio as well. Students must pass Research and Thesis I before enrolling in this course. Students may enroll in 470.709 Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods instead of Research and Thesis II with the permission of the instructor.