Course Schedule

The courses below are those offered for the term. (To view the course description, class dates & times, touch on accordion tab by the title.)

State-specific Information for Online Programs

Note: Students should be aware of additional state-specific information for online programs. For more information, please contact an admissions representative. 

  • Online Courses

    460.601.81 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4085

    Phyllis Hecht

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.601.82 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4085

    Gregory Stevens

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.601.83 - Exploring Museum Professions

    $4085

    Redell Hearn

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Managing a 21st-century museum relies upon the coordinated efforts of a wide range of specially skilled staff from directors, curators, and educators to collection managers, conservators, and exhibition designers to event planners, press officers, fundraisers, and administrators to media, IT, membership, security, and facilities management teams. These professionals working behind-the-scenes or out front with the public define the quality of the institution and each visitor's experience. Through readings and interviews with leaders in the field, this course examines the core functions of a museum and explores how the roles and responsibilities of museum professionals assure an organization's daily operation, growth and sustainability. Current issues facing museums, including diversity in the workforce, financial challenges, and the effects of technology will also be addressed. In addition, students will engage in activities to help strategize their own museum career. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.602 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.602.81 - Museums in the Digital Age

    $4085

    Robin Dowden

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    With the emergence of new media and the ever-expanding use of the Internet, the traditional role and scope of the museum is changing. The museum has a new position in global communication, dissemination of information and cultural understanding. The introduction of technology into the museum is challenging traditional exhibition concepts, introducing new interactions with museum audiences, and affecting the museum’s core operations. This course introduces students to the museum field and explores the impact of media and technology on the museum, including an overview of the historical role of the museum in society and an examination of the current uses and effects of digitization, the Internet, and wireless technologies in these institutions, as well as basic concepts underlying the planning of a technology project for a museum. Note: This course may be taken as an elective, if you have taken 460.601 to meet the requirement.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.604.81 - Introduction to Museum Education

    $4085

    Elizabeth Baird

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the educational role of the museum. What benefits and services does museum education provide in a pluralistic society? What do educators do within the museum organization? We begin by tracing the history of education in museums. We review theories about how people learn, what constitutes good teaching practice in the museum, and the unique role that objects play in an informal learning environment. We look at the different kinds of audiences for education programs, how to develop museum experiences including effective education programs and services, how evaluation works in gathering feedback and assessing outcomes in a museum setting, and the role of educators in inter- and intra-museum collaborative projects such as the development of exhibition interpretation, marketing for educational programs, audience building and interpretive planning. This course also considers the role and integration of digital technologies in the provision of educational services, products and programs. As a culminating project, students research and develop a conference proposal based on an education-related topic of their choice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.604.82 - Introduction to Museum Education

    $4085

    Robert Beatty

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the educational role of the museum. What benefits and services does museum education provide in a pluralistic society? What do educators do within the museum organization? We begin by tracing the history of education in museums. We review theories about how people learn, what constitutes good teaching practice in the museum, and the unique role that objects play in an informal learning environment. We look at the different kinds of audiences for education programs, how to develop museum experiences including effective education programs and services, how evaluation works in gathering feedback and assessing outcomes in a museum setting, and the role of educators in inter- and intra-museum collaborative projects such as the development of exhibition interpretation, marketing for educational programs, audience building and interpretive planning. This course also considers the role and integration of digital technologies in the provision of educational services, products and programs. As a culminating project, students research and develop a conference proposal based on an education-related topic of their choice.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.606.81 - Exhibition Strategies

    $4085

    Emily Saich

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces the diverse strategies and approaches used in exhibition planning, development and implementation. It asks students to think critically about exhibitions and the interface between objects, concept and experience. The course focuses on visitor-centered interpretive design and is applicable to a wide range of institutions. Students spend much of the semester working together in small teams, collaboratively producing a comprehensive exhibition project as they walk through the practical steps in exhibition development and design. Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Because of the high level of online group work, this course is not recommended for first semester students.

    460.608.81 - The Business of Museums

    $4085

    Leonard Steinbach

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Museums are stewards of cultural heritage and intellectual property, vortices of knowledge, and arbiters of taste. They are community icons, places of respite, and public education adjuncts. Museums don’t necessarily deal in products for profit, yet they compete in an entertainment ecology. They must cultivate members, donors, government funds and corporate contributions, and rely on programs, gifts, grants, sponsorships, retail operations, and planned giving to survive. They must advocate for themselves in the legislative arena, while constricted by their nonprofit status. Students will become conversant in the fundamentals of museum business including mission, nonprofit status, transparency, governance, programming, management, finance, fundraising, facilities, legal and ethics issues, the impact of technologies, and everchanging audiences. They will achieve this through readings, thought-provoking essays, engaging discussions, museum news analysis, recorded public talks, and live online discussions with leading museum professionals.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.611.81 - History & Philosophy of Museums

    $4085

    Laura-Edythe Coleman

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    From cabinets of curiosities to historical monuments and sites of memory, this course surveys museum history from a global perspective to examine how the museum’s function has changed over time. Students create a comprehensive timeline of museum history and philosophy—thinking through and visualizing the way certain concepts and events are related in time and across space. Through case studies and course readings in museum history, theory and methods, students will contextualize the philosophical trends that have impacted organizational structures, outreach, collection strategies, and the museum’s role and relationship to its public.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.615.81 - Museums and Community Engagement

    $4085

    Candace Matelic

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course explores how museums and cultural organizations of all sizes can strengthen their relationships with the communities they serve. No longer are museums measured and judged solely by their internal resources—collections, endowments, facilities, and staff—but rather by the external benefits and value they create for individuals and communities. Growing numbers of museums are learning to make their organizations more meaningful and relevant by involving their communities in ongoing planning and decision-making. They are reframing museum activities to focus on what matters to their communities. By getting involved in community challenges and developing new partnerships, they are identifying underserved audiences and creating memorable visitor experiences. As museums begin this journey towards community engagement, they are initiating and facilitating social change and moving towards social entrepreneurship. This course includes the theory and skills of community engagement, drawing on both research and practice for examples.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.618.81 - Museum Controversies: Ethical Issues in Museums

    $4085

    Arthur Molella

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Museum directors, curators, and other staffers have faced an array of political and ethical dilemmas in an increasingly contentious environment. This course explores the historical, political, and cultural backgrounds to controversies surrounding exhibitions such as the Smithsonian’s display of the Enola Gay, the Brooklyn Museum of Art’s “Sensation,” the British Museum’s Elgin Marbles, and the showing of illegally acquired antiquities at various art museums. Nationalism, religious beliefs, obscenity, and “edutainment” are among the issues discussed.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.628.81 - Architecture of Museums

    $4085

    Karen Wizevich

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course serves as an introduction to museum architecture, including the history of museum buildings, as well as current case studies of renovations, expansions and new facilities. We will discuss the relevant topics in creating a physical museum space, such as developing a museum program, planning the visitor experience, developing wayfinding systems, building a green museum, and incorporating technology in the initial plan. We will analyze museum buildings from multiple perspectives, including visitors, staff and collections. Students will learn how to evaluate an existing museum building and will be guided through a mini-POE (post-occupancy evaluation) of a museum in their community.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.638.81 - Preservation of Analog and Digital Photographs

    $4085

    Millard Schisler

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course will explore the main principles in caring for analog and digital photographic collections. It has been designed as a broad approach to the subject, but with enough depth to give the student an approach to the care for photographic collections with both historical and natively born digital photographs. This course will provide this insight from looking at the materials that photographs are composed of, understanding the materials and environment that they are housed in, and the technologies and workflows needed to care for analog and natively born digital photographs for long-term preservation. Students will be required to build and present a case study and a final project discussing a topic related to the course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.640.81 - Educational Programming for Museum Audiences

    $4085

    Anna Slafer

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Educational programming for today's museums requires more skills than ever before, from defining mission-driven educational goals to conducting summative evaluation, from understanding learning theory and characteristics of a myriad of museum audiences, to designing and implementing technology solutions. Students in this course will learn the steps needed to design sound educational programming in museums, including developmentally appropriate learning theory and strategies for audiences such as children, families, adults, teachers, and students. Prerequisite: Introduction to Museum Education (460.604)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Introduction to Museum Education (460.604)

    460.645.81 - Museums and Mobile: Adapting to Change

    $4085

    Eric Longo

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    We live in a mobile-first world. The mobile revolution has profoundly altered our behaviors, transforming our very expectations of how we interact with the world around us: we now expect to get what we want on any device, at anytime, anywhere, at the touch of a finger. And we expect the same when interacting with cultural institutions. The future of museum technology lies heavily in the use of mobile platforms, but how should museums adapt to the future? Through presentations, interviews, guest speakers, hands-on experience, group discussions and collaborative assignments, this course will explore the many questions and issues facing cultural institutions as they try to adapt to this mobile mind shift, and how museums can leverage mobile as a platform for social conversation, deeper brand engagement, and of course opportunities for education. Students will learn how to leverage mobile to engage visitors, balance the need for curatorial direction with user participation, and how to redefine the museum experience for mobile visitors, both onsite and offsite. Prerequisite: Museums in the Digital Age (460.602)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Museums in the Digital Age (460.602)

    460.657.81 - Fundamentals of Museum Fundraising

    $4085

    Rosalia Crosby

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Through a combination of current and historical readings, case studies, discussions, and written assignments based on “real-life” scenarios, this course will cover general fundraising strategies and ethics, ePhilanthropy, prospect research, grant writing, annual and capital campaigns, corporate giving and cause marketing, special events and stewardship.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.662.81 - Developing Museum Web Projects

    $4085

    Dana Allen-Greil

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    How can museums best use the web to further their missions? What are the best practices for planning and sustaining high-quality online projects? In this course, students will survey the application of online technologies for various purposes, including collections, education, exhibition, fundraising, collaboration, and marketing projects. The bulk of the coursework will focus on researching and creating the components of a Web project plan (for a project of the student's own choice and design). Students will gain hands-on experience with audience research and usability testing, articulating technology solutions to match desired goals, developing information architecture, building a basic online prototype, crafting a marketing and evaluation plan, and pitching a project idea for funding. A range of online technologies will be considered including websites, blogs, email newsletters, mobile applications, and social media.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.665.81 - Introduction to Archives

    $4085

    Christopher Steele

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of archives, including an overview relating to the elements of an archival program and the role and work of archivists. Special attention will be paid to the work of archivists in a museum context. The theoretical component of the course will be supplemented with a variety of hands-on exercises, case studies, and informed anecdotes designed to illustrate the relationship between theory and practice. Although American archival tradition will be the focus, international perspectives on archival theory and practice will play an important role in the course of study. Topics include: acquisition; appraisal; arrangement and description; preservation; reference; outreach; archival access systems; legal and ethical issues; and born-digital curation, including digital preservation.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.666.81 - Collection Management

    $4085

    Marla Misunas

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.666.82 - Collection Management

    $4085

    Carlos Hernandez

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Museums exist to preserve and share their collections with the world. Collection managers, or registrars, are essential to any collecting institution, whether collections are art, history, science, or live specimens. This course focuses on management principles that can be applied broadly to any type of collection. The course covers all aspects of collections care from the acquisition of objects, evaluation, care and storage, through loans and exhibitions. Safe collections care and handling, using the most current methods, are emphasized so objects may be preserved for future generations. Any student who intends to work at a collecting institution will benefit from mastering the practical knowledge and skills underpinning many phases of museum work, which will be taught in this class.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.668.81 - Cataloging Museum Collections: History, Standards, and Applications

    $4085

    George Harris

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Cultural heritage institutions—including museums, libraries, and archives—have as core responsibilities the safeguarding of the objects in their care and the education of the public about these objects. To support both of these responsibilities, one of the foundational activities of cultural heritage professionals is the cataloging of the objects in their collections. This course will provide both an overview and practicum of cataloging definitions, philosophies, standards, and practices. Recordkeeping methods, numbering systems and data formats will be emphasized, and professionally accepted standards for cataloging various cultural objects will be reviewed. Discussion of the broad application of cataloging data sets, including cross collection aggregation and search, delivery to the public, and Web 2.0 and 3.0 delivery methods will be covered.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.670.81 - Digital Preservation

    $4085

    Riccardo Ferrante

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course introduces students to the current state of digital preservation, preservation challenges, and basic concepts for designing effective digital preservation plans and programs. Topics include the relevance of digital preservation for museums; archival principles that inform preservation practices; standards and policies; considerations in preservation strategies; issues relating to formats, repositories, and processes; and emerging preservation solutions and services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.671.81 - Foundations of Digital Curation

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course lays a foundation for managing digital information throughout its life cycle by introducing students to the emerging field of digital curation and by examining the practical issues and tools involved in managing digital collections and repositories over time. Topics include metadata schemas for describing digital assets in different disciplines; sharing digital content beyond the institution to reach wider audiences; requirements for trustworthy repository services; management of research data; policy issues; and user services. Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Note: Students who are not enrolled in the Digital Curation Certificate program are encouraged to take 460.666 Collection Management before enrolling in this course.

    460.672.81 - Managing Digital Information in Museums

    $4085

    Charles Patch

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    preservation of digital assets, with an emphasis on the unique problems facing museums. Subjects will include the best practices for digital format conversion, the management of digital surrogates and derivatives, practical planning and design of workflow for digital curation, and a survey of the technologies (software, equipment, and metadata schemas) required at ingest, storage, access, and dissemination points in the Open Archival Information System model. These topics will be presented within the context of analyzing the digital asset management practices (in the broadest sense) of individual institutions and developing strategies for the curation of these assets. Prerequisite: Either 460.670 Digital Preservation OR 460.671 Foundations of Digital Curation; both are recommended.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Either 460.670 Digital Preservation OR 460.671 Foundations of Digital Curation; both are recommended.

    460.674.81 - Digital Curation Research Paper

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    The supervised research course enables students to investigate a significant problem or issue in digital curation and to develop and demonstrate critical thinking and communication skills. Ideally, the research paper will build on the student’s internship experience. The research paper is expected to result in a publishable or presentable paper that makes a contribution to the literature and field of digital curation. As there is currently a significant need for research in digital curation, and relatively little published literature—especially relating to museums—student research in this program can make a major contribution, and graduates will be prepared for careers as leaders in the field. Course work, assignments, and meetings with a faculty member will take place in an online course environment. The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 The research paper is normally completed as the final requirement in the Digital Curation Certificate program.

    460.675.81 - Leadership of Museums

    $4085

    Anne Ackerson
    Joan Baldwin

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    A museum career offers many opportunities for leadership. Whether you want to be a museum director or not, throughout your career you will lead individual projects, teams, departments, or organizations. This course is designed to introduce students to the nature and practice of leadership in the 21st-century museum. Regardless of an institution’s age, size, location, discipline, or its focus, leadership determines its tenor and tone. Leadership frames a museum’s intangible values while underpinning its tangible assets. It comes in many guises, proactive, reactive or benign, driving institutions forward or binding them to the past. Leadership can be a lightning rod for change or preserve an organization in amber. Good, bad or indifferent, it drives everything, yet in theory and practice it receives little direct attention. Underpinning this course is the philosophy that we each make leadership choices affecting boards, staffs and colleagues, as well as our own careers. This course focuses on personal leadership development, beginning with an assessment of students’ leadership strengths and weaknesses while building awareness of challenges, best practices, and practical workplace applications. Through reading, discussion, and projects students will deepen their understanding of their personal leadership capacities, grasp the importance of self-awareness to leadership growth, and utilize their skills across the rapidly evolving world of the 21st-century museum. Prerequisite: Students must have completed ONE of the following courses to register for this course: Business of Museums (460.608); History and Philosophy (460.611); OR Museums and Community Engagement (460.615)

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Prerequisite: Students must have completed ONE of the following courses to register for this course: Business of Museums (460.608); History and Philosophy (460.611); OR Museums and Community Engagement (460.615)

    460.683.81 - Project Management in Museums

    $4085

    David Whitemyer

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Project management is the oversight and process of planning, organizing, and coordinating multiple tasks, resources, and stakeholders. In museum settings it often requires a choreographed juggle of scheduling, budget tracking, content and education considerations, facility and operations issues, and human resources; along with an ability to be flexible and calmly tackle unexpected challenges. This course will present both theoretical and practical concepts for initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, and completing projects in a museum. Using real world scenarios and different types of projects, the course will, provide students with tools and strategies necessary for project scheduling, task supervision, and stakeholder management. Project management is a learned skill, useful not only to those who will ultimately oversee a project, but to everyone who may eventually be part of a project team.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.690.81 - Science, Society, and the Museum

    $4085

    Richard Kissel

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Museums have been shaping the public discourse on science for centuries. They serve as a bridge between science and society, a way for general citizens to connect with, engage, and increasingly contribute to scientific understanding. “Science, Society, and the Museum” presents the history of this intimate relationship, detailing the connection and affect that science and society have on one another, and the museum as the documentarian of that relationship. From Darwin and Sputnik to global change and extinction, the course emphasizes the responsibility of museums—past and present—to embrace their role in communicating science and increasing the scientific literacy of an engaged population.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.702.81 - Studies in World Heritage

    $4085

    Sarah Chicone

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course offers an in-depth exploration of the World Heritage movement by focusing on the concept of heritage, both tangible and intangible, its historical development, its international conventions, and the role of technology in its past, present, and future. Students will be asked to engage critically with contemporary heritage concepts such as authenticity, ownership, assessment, value, and preservation that form much of our global understanding of the field of cultural heritage studies. Through case studies, lectures, discussions, and readings, students will explore international heritage policy as structured by the institutional complex (UNESCO, ICOMOS, International Center for the Study of Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property (ICCROM), International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), the World Bank, and the World Monuments Fund) and consider both its local and global impact.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.704.81 - Cultural Heritage Management/Leadership

    $4085

    Brian Lione

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    Cultural heritage management is a complex intersection of theory and practice. This course will explore issues related to cultural sector management and leadership. Through the lens of current practice, we will examine core theoretical concepts and tools, including traditional approaches as well as the incorporation of emergent technology. We will look closely at the roles of the cultural manager and the proficiencies and characteristics needed for effective management and leadership within the cultural sector. We will consider changing definitions of protection and stewardship as they relate to cultural heritage as well as a larger framing of public interest, what publics, which interests.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.740.81 - Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age

    $4085

    Douglas Pritchard

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    A Greek colony from the 6th century BC is brought to life with augmented reality; a Buddhist cave with centuries-old artworks—at risk because of environmental threat—is preserved with a 3D digital reconstruction; cultural heritage information, images, and damage assessments are catalogued in open source databases. These are just a few examples of how a growing number of scholars, researchers, and practitioners are looking to technology as a means to understand, interpret, document, and preserve cultural heritage worldwide. This course will explore the ways in which cultural heritage professionals are implementing contemporary digital technologies to enhance research, conservation, management and preservation of tangible and intangible heritage, as well as methods of education and engagement of visitors to cultural heritage sites. Through lectures, readings, assignments, and social media, students will identify and analyze the incorporation of technology currently being used in cultural heritage studies and practice, as well as envision its use for the future.

    Technology Fee: $175.00

    460.755.81 - Museum Projects

    $4085

    Linda Norris

    Online 8/28 - 12/16

    This course expands opportunities for practical experiences beyond the onsite seminar and internship elective. Offered as an online experience, this course will involve students in an actual museum or museum-related project. Students will work in collaborative teams facilitated by a JHU faculty member and engage with museum professionals outside of the program. The goal of the course will be to establish a prototype or complete a real-life project of value to the museum field while interacting with current museum professionals. Museum Projects will be offered on an occasional basis and will vary in topic. Different prerequisites will be set up each time the course is scheduled depending upon the specific project. In addition to weekly research, writing and asynchronous discussions in the course management system, students should expect to participate in five to seven real-time online meetings throughout the semester, dates of which will be determined by the Museum Project team in tandem with the project requirements and deadlines. Students must submit a Museum Project application form two weeks before registration begins to be approved for enrollment in the Museum Project course. On this form, students will describe their interest in the specific Museum Project offered and other applicable topics as requested, as well as confirm their ability to attend five to seven real-time sessions. A selection committee will review the applications and determine enrollment eligibility before the semester’s registration begins. Enrollment limits may vary depending upon the project.

    Technology Fee: $175.00 Students must completed at least 2 courses in the Museum Studies program to be eligible for this course and submit a Museum Project application form to be approved for enrollment in the Museum Project course. Contact program director phecht@jhu.edu for the application

  • Off-Site or International

    460.610.91 - Two-Week Onsite Seminar

    $4085

    Dina Bailey

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 10/24 - 12/21

    A two-week intensive period of on-ground museum study in a location organized by the MA in Museum Studies program is a required component of the program. The seminar includes practicum opportunities in a variety of museum settings, conversations with local museum professionals, observation of and interaction with museum visitors, and class sessions to integrate the daily experiences. Using the rich diversity of museums, this course provides students with the chance to use what they have learned in their prior courses, develop networks with fellow students and museum experts, and explore the latest in museum practice, including exhibition design and development, public programming, collections management, conservation, and the uses of technology in the museum. Seminars have taken place in locations as diverse as Washington, DC, New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, San Diego, London, Berlin, and Barcelona. Students work in teams on directed activities during the two-week period. Note: Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program, although four or more courses are encouraged, to register for this course. One of these courses must be 460.601 or 460.602 and some seminars may have other specific requirements. Students are responsible for travel to and from the location, accommodations, and meals, as well as any specified field trip fees. Waiver option: Students who are unable to travel to a seminar location due to accommodation needs, financial hardship, or family challenges may apply to the program director for an exemption to the two-week seminar. If a waiver is granted, the student must enroll in the internship option (460.750) to fulfill the on-site component of the degree requirement.

    Atlanta: Two-week Onsite Seminar, November 6-17, 2017. This course has a non-refundable $350 fee. If you drop this course, you will be refunded the tuition only, but not the $350 fee. Note that tuition/fees may not appear immediately on your billing statement but the previously stated refund information still applies. Please contact the Registration office if you need to drop this course. You cannot drop this course through SIS, you must contact the Registration office at aapregistration@jhu.edu or fill out the add/drop form (http://advanced.jhu.edu/current-students/forms/online-adddrop-form/) if you wish to drop.

    460.673.91 - Digital Curation Certificate Internship

    $4085

    Joyce Ray

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 8/28 - 12/16

    The internship, including at least 120 hours of field experience, affords students the opportunity to gain hands-on experience working with experts who are leading digital curation activities in museums and related cultural heritage organizations in the U.S. and abroad. The internship is a partnership between the university and the host institution, and is customized to meet each student’s needs and career goals. The program will assist students in arranging appropriate internships. Student interns will produce evidence of their accomplishments through work products, project reports, or other documentation in an online course component and will participate in online discussion forums with other students enrolled in digital curation internships during the same semester. The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    The internship is usually taken after completing at least two of the following core courses: Digital Preservation (460.670), Foundations of Digital Curation (460.671), or Managing Digital Information in Museums (460.672). Note: Students should discuss internship plans with the Digital Curation Certificate Program Coordinator at least one semester before enrolling in the course.

    460.750.91 - Museum Internship

    $4085

    Judith Landau

    Sunday 12:00 - 12:01; 8/28 - 12/16

    An internship at a student’s local museum, approved by the internship coordinator, may be substituted for one elective course. To fulfill the internship requirement, a student must complete a minimum of 80 hours of work onsite and a project, (either a research paper or a practical product) on an approved topic related to his/her experience, due at the end of the semester. Students also participate in online discussion and course work during the semester. Before registering for the internship option, the student should contact the internship coordinator for approval. At least four to six weeks before the beginning of the semester in which the internship will take place, the student must submit: 1) a description of the internship weekly duties including activities and/or responsibilities; 2) learning objectives and goals; 3) why this experience should be part of the Museum Studies degree; and 4) a signed letter of commitment from the internship supervisor. Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.

    Students must have completed a minimum of two courses in the program before registering for this internship.