News - Advanced Academic Programs

What’s with the Map? (@JHUWorldCrisis)

The map on our Twitter page teased out a comment: “… that must be migration patterns from thousands of years ago.” Migration patterns indeed — but not simply of urgently moving people, but of the inevitable impetus of their immortal DNA: Specifically, YDNA Haplogroups. This map has the wonderful virtue of revealing the full reality of read more…

A NASA paradigm for world crisis? (updated)

A recent NASA-funded study offers us a model for bounding (and even predicting) a world crisis — and subsequent subsidence: The effort, “based on a new cross-disciplinary ‘Human And Nature Dynamical’ (HANDY) model,” seems to approximate an update on the famous (or infamous) Club of Rome studies that stand on fixed, “hydraulic” (meaning, in-and-out) models. read more…

How can we compare death rates among world crises past and future?

  Ian Morris’ new book, War! What Is It Good For? Shows a surprising decline in deaths Does over the course of human history. Might a new crisis change that calculus — and how can we bound such effects? Here is his summary: He leaves out climate change-pandemic-war intersections, like the later 6th century, or read more…

Are ungoverned spaces a threshold of change?

Juan Cole’s post, Five Ways Nevada Rancher Militia Resembles Pakistan’s Taliban, shows more than a shred of satire and an ounce of irony: But it highlights changes that may underlie crises in the making: Transformation in governance. There is a favorite term invoked in Washington: “Ungoverned spaces.” In Washington’s mental frame, like “failed states,” ungoverned spaces speak read more…

Why is this ancient helmet our course badge?

This helmet is our icon of The Dark Ages. Yet it is the words themselves that haunt us: Dark Ages. They are a reproach to the very idea of civilization. How could something so magnificent as Rome fail and fall? How could the greatest achievement of all, the Roman world, come apart? The Sutton Hoo read more…

Chronic illness model for system subsidence?

John Minehan @John_Minehan offers an intriguing possible model framework for world crisis and eventual system subsidence: The Corbin and Strauss Chronic Illness Trajectory model He writes: “This course is a great idea.” “The thing that muddies the water is that collapse takes a while and is cumulative.  “No one could have predicted it!” is usually untrue.  People read more…

“Ashen Truths” (a global net assessment): Extended course description

“Ashen Truths” (a global net assessment): Tracking and Bounding Future World Crisis “Net Assessment” began during the Cold War as a threat-based “framework for analyzing the national security strategy of the United States.” Yet the idea of a holistic approach to strategic threats transports well to other “big” challenges. Perhaps the biggest challenge we face is read more…

The Importance of Global Net Assessment

By Michael Vlahos (Dr. Vlahos will teach 470.664.51 “Global Net Assessment: Tracking and Bounding World Crisis” in the summer semester) It is official: AMC’s series The Walking Dead shows how Americans are wildly into the Zombie Apocalypse. But such mass literary engagement is also a testament of a larger awareness and anxiety over the prospect of real “end times.” It is chilling read more…

New Course – Federal Environmental Compliance in Public Transit

Spend your summer exploring the inner workings of public transit from the Federal perspective with the Johns Hopkins MS in Environmental Sciences and Policy program. Current Students Register Now_ _ Federal Environmental Compliance in Public Transit 420.655.81 Public transit occupies a central role in modern, sustainable planning. Each year, new capital transit projects are changing read more…

Podcast: The Ukraine Crisis and Strategic Nonviolence

Maciej Bartkowski, Thumb Image

Mark Stout, Director of the MA in Global Security Studies and the Certificate in National Security Studies, sits down with our adjunct instructor, Dr. Maciej Bartkowski of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, to talk about strategic nonviolent conflict. They discuss what makes strategic nonviolent conflict such a powerful weapon against occupiers and oppressors; how Ukrainians have used it; and how it read more…